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Breaking Protocol: Cryptocurrency and Capital Controls in Greece
Jan24

Breaking Protocol: Cryptocurrency and Capital Controls in Greece

Which came first– coin or the ledger? In either case, physical currency or a tally of debts and payments have been the two primary forms of money used throughout history. Today, physical cash is increasingly being replaced with cashless systems including cryptocurrencies. This week, we hear from blockchain researcher Jaya Klara Brekke on the political economy of blockchain and consensus protocols. And we go to Athens where contributors Niki Seth-Smith and Alyssa Moxley look at how some Greeks have been using cryptocurrencies since banking restrictions were imposed in 2015. Special thanks to this week’s contributors, Alyssa Moxley and Niki Seth-Smith. Like this program? Please show us the love. Click here and support our non-profit journalism. Thanks! Featuring: Jaya Klara Brekke, Author and Researcher (specializing in the political economy of blockchain and consensus protocols) Matthew Slater, FairCoin Developer and Fair Coop Member Dionysus Zindros, Blockchain PhD Student, University of Athens Nikos, Owner of Taverna Aggelos (accepts BitCoin) Achilleas, Bee Keeper and Volunteer at Fair Spot Credits: Host: Monica Lopez Producers: Anita Johnson, Marie Choi, Monica Lopez, R.J. Lozada Contributing Producers: Alyssa Moxley, Niki Seth-Smith Executive Director: Lisa Rudman Audience Engagement Director/Web Editor: Sabine Blaizin Development Associate: Vera Tykulsker Music: “Fater Lee”,  Black Ant “Click Clack”, David Szesztay “Subway” (Instrumental Version), David Szesztay More Information: FairCoin Pew Research Center 8 in 10 Greeks Not Happy With Government Distributing Chains Jaya Klara Brekke Greek Eco-Community Alyssa...

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Wealth Inequity and Universal Basic Income
Jan17

Wealth Inequity and Universal Basic Income

When Donald Trump was sworn in as the 45th president of the United states, the wealth gap between rich and poor was already very wide. The top 10% of families — those who had at least $942,000 — held 76% of total wealth. The average amount of wealth in this group was $4 million. And the entire bottom half of the population had just 1% of the total wealth pie, this gap continues to rise and when the statistical scope accounts for race, the disparity worsens. Chuck Collins, Director of the Program On Inequality at the Institute for Policy Studies, traces the history of the wealth gap in his work. Is Universal Basic Income, or UBI, an answer to the wealth gap, and to poverty? Or is it the tech community’s neoliberal dream? For this answer we hear from the producers from Upstream. Special thanks to Upstream Podcast: Upstreampodcast.org. Like this program? Please show us the love. Click here and support our non-profit journalism. Thanks! Featuring: Chuck Collins, Director of the Program On Inequality at the Institute for Policy Studies Julianna Bidadanure – Assistant Professor in Political Philosophy at Stanford University Doug Henwood – Economist, Journalist Credits: Host: R.J. Lozada Producers: Anita Johnson, Marie Choi, Monica Lopez, R.J. Lozada Upstream Podcast Producers: Della Z Duncan, Robert R. Raymond Executive Director: Lisa Rudman Audience Engagement Director/Web Editor: Sabine Blaizin Development Associate: Vera Tykulsker More Information: Born on Third Base, by Chuck Collins Inequality.org United for a Fair Economy Upstream Podcast The Color of Money – Mehrsa Baradaran  Economic Policy Institute, The Racial Wealth...

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Finding Home: Displacement and Homelessness from Cape Town to California
Jul12

Finding Home: Displacement and Homelessness from Cape Town to California

On this edition of Making Contact we go from Cape Town, South Africa to Los Angeles and Oakland, California— three cities grappling with evictions, displacement, and homelessness. Like this program? Please show us the love. Click here and support our non-profit journalism. Thanks! Featuring: Needa Bee, Oakland-Based Housing Advocate Messiah Ali, Oakland Resident Tom Waldman, Director of Communications, Los Angeles Homeless Services Authority Flora Harris, C-3 Program Director, St. Joseph Center Chyheeb Joseph, Outreach Worker, Los Angeles Homeless Services Authority Riyaadh Najaar, Pigeon Racer Delia Adrian and Shahied Mizenheimer, District 6 Residents Jane Roberts, Blikkiesdorp Resident Credits: Host: Monica Lopez Producers: Anita Johnson, Marie Choi, Monica Lopez, R.J. Lozada Contributing Producers: Tony Andrews, Kimon de Greef Executive Director: Lisa Rudman Audience Engagement Director/Web Editor: Sabine Blaizin Development Associate: Vera Tykulsker   More Information: St. Joseph Center Los Angeles Homeless Services Authority “City of Oakland Clears Out The Village Homeless Encampment”, Sam Lefebvre Wikipedia Page on Blikkiesdorp Carson Watch NYC Mayor De Blasio’s Homeless Plan...

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A Look at Labor Organizing, and Worker and Immigrant Rights
Apr26

A Look at Labor Organizing, and Worker and Immigrant Rights

Our latest radio release looks at workers organizing, inside and outside of labor unions. You’ll meet members of the Restaurant Opportunities Center of LA and hear from Day Laborers in Pasadena who are creating their own phone app and collective bargaining system by sharing info about employers. Plus an interview with Jane McAlevey, union member and union critic. Like this program? Please show us the love. Click here to support our non-profit journalism and be sure to join our newsletter. Thanks! Featuring: Cal Soto, National Day Laborer Organizing Network (NDLON) NDLON worker members – Marta, Jesús, Angel Kathy Hoang, Director of Restaurant Opportunities Center – Los Angeles Jane McAlevey, union organizer and author of No Shortcuts: Organizing for Power in the New Gilded Age Credits: Host: Monica Lopez Contributing Producers: Paulina Velasco, Doug Henwood Producers: Anita Johnson, Marie Choi, Monica Lopez, R.J. Lozada, Andrew Stelzer Executive Director: Lisa Rudman Audience Engagement Director/Web Editor: Sabine Blaizin Development Associate: Vera Tykulsker Special thanks this week to the Degel-Berwick Family Foundation   More Information: National Day Laborer Organizing Network Pasadena Community Jobs Center Restaurant Opportunities Center, Los Angeles Jane McAlevey Sanctuary Restaurants...

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Occupy, 5 years later
Sep21

Occupy, 5 years later

September marks the 5 year anniversary of Occupy. We go to Zuccotti Park, and Oakland to talk to individuals that were part of Occupy Wall Street and Occupy Oakland to gain insight and reflection on the movement that swept the nation. Featuring: Samara Ward, Occupy Oakland participant Joyous DeAsis, Young Oakland organizer, Occupy Oakland participant Marisa Holmes, Filmmaker, Occupy Wall Street facilitator Needa Bee, Occupy Oakland participant Krystof Lapour, Occupy Oakland participant Samsarah Morgan, doula and birth worker, Founder of Occupy Oakland Children’s Village and Parents and Allies Caucus of Occupy Oakland, Occupy Decolonize Birth Parenting and Pregnancy Caucus Rebecca Ruiz Sunwoo, Organizer Idriss Stelley Foundation, Occupy Oakland participant Ashoka Finley, Black radical, Occupy the Farm participant Credits Host: R.J. Lozada Contributing Producer: Marie Choi Music: Alex Fitch, “Seeking Clarity” and “We Call This Home III”, Blue Dot Sessions, “Union Hall Melody” and “Insatiable Toad”, Cory Gray, “Build a View”,  The Losers, “Gotta Keep Moving” For More Information: Occupy Wall Street New York City General Assembly West Coast Port Shutdown Announcement VIDEO Rebecca Ruiz Sunwoo, Open Letter to the Occupy Movement: The Decolonization Proposal VIDEO Occupy the Farm Film Naomi Wolf, “Revealed: How the FBI Coordinated the Crackdown on Occupy”, The Guardian Apex Express, Occupy Retrospective Davey D, “General Strike #OccupyOakland”, OLM News “Arun Gupta and Marina Sitrin on Occupy’s Anniversary”, Moyers and Company Dario Azzellini and Marina Sitrin, They Can’t Represent Us! Reinventing Democracy from Greece to Occupy Arun Gupta, “What Became of Occupy Wall Street?”,...

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Invisible Workers, Laboring in the Shadows
Aug31

Invisible Workers, Laboring in the Shadows

* This program won the award  for Explanatory Journalism in radio/audio from the Society of Professional Journalists, Norther California Chapter in Nov. 2016. Congrats to all !  Please add your congratulations here. Millions of people around the world work in jobs that aren’t formally recognized or afforded legal protections typical of wage earning jobs. They’re often not even thought of as legitimate work. On this edition of Making Contact, we’re going to meet people making work where there is no work for them. From recyclers, to border couriers, to waste pickers, we’re exploring the informal labor sector and what some are doing to gain greater recognition, protections, and rights. Featuring Landon Goodwin, recycler and pastor and also featured in documentary Dogtown Redemption Aicha al Azzouzi border courier Salma al Azzouzi, Aicha’s oldest daughter Charles Gachanga Gichonge, creator of the Mustard Seed Courtyard clean-up campaign Antony Makau, Dandora resident Richard Munene, Dandora restaurant owner Sally Roever, Urban Policy Director for Women in Informal Employment Globalizing and Organizing (WIEGO) Malati Gadgil, KKPKP Credits Host: Laura Flynn Contributing Producers: Thalia Beaty, Maggy Donaldson, and Beenish Ahmed Featured Music: Blue Dot Sessions: Lesser Gods of Metal, Tyrano Theme, and Pavement Hack, Tours: Enthusiast, Salomé Lego Playset: La Lutte, Comme Experience Intérieure, Janneh: Humajataritee Photo Credits: Thalia Beaty and Maggy Donaldson Show segments An Unusual but Legal Trade: the “Mule Women” of Morocco This slideshow requires JavaScript. We head to the Spanish enclave Ceuta bordering Morocco. The border is a gateway for a brisk trade. Moroccan markets sell goods imported from Spain at a discount for buyers. But that discount comes at a price — for the Moroccan women who bring those goods across the border…on their backs. Co-reported with Maggy Donaldson, Thalia Beaty brings us this story. From dump site to Mustard Seed Courtyards There’s a neighborhood in Nairobi, Kenya that doubles as the city’s main garbage dump. More than 900 tons of trash are piled into Dandora every day. It was declared full more than a decade ago, but the trucks kept coming — dropping everything from household scraps to medical waste. The waste has polluted the water, soil, and air according to the report, Trash and Tragedy by Concern Worldwide. And it has compromised the health of more than 200,000 people. Often the trucks also dump garbage into the surrounding courtyards of residents. While an estimated 10,000 people earn money by mining the trash for recyclables, even those who work at the dump don’t want to live in a dump. Reporter Beenish Ahmed has the story of a community-driven clean-up effort in Dandora. More information: Dogtown Redemption Concern Worldwide: Trash and Tragedy, the impact of garbage on human rights in Nairobi City Women in Informal Employment: Globalizing...

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