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Uprooting Racism: How White People Can Work for Racial Justice
Aug01

Uprooting Racism: How White People Can Work for Racial Justice

On this edition of Making Contact, we speak with author Paul Kivel about his book, Uprooting Racism: How White People Can Work for Racial Justice. This book offers a framework for understanding institutional racism. It provides practical suggestions, tools, examples, and advice on how white people can intervene in interpersonal and organizational situations to work as allies for racial justice. Completely revised and updated, this expanded third edition directly engages the reader through questions, exercises, and suggestions for action, and takes a detailed look at current issues such as affirmative action, immigration, and health care. It also includes a wealth of information about specific cultural groups such as Muslims, people with mixed-heritage, Native Americans, Jews, recent immigrants, Asian Americans, and Latinos. Like this program? Please show us the love. Click here and support our non-profit journalism. Thanks!  Featuring: Paul Kivel, Author of Uprooting Racism Credits: Host: Anita Johnson Producers: Anita Johnson, Monica Lopez, Salima Hamirani Executive Director: Lisa Rudman Audience Engagement Director/Web Editor: Sabine Blaizin Development Associate: Vera Tykulsker More Information: Paul Kivel website Uprooting Racism: How White People Can Work for Racial Justice America’s Dark Underbelly Six Things White People Can Do To Reach Friends and Family Members to End Racism. Growing up black in America: here’s my story of everyday racism Oppression in...

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Caring Relationships: Negotiating Meaning and Maintaining Dignity
Jul25

Caring Relationships: Negotiating Meaning and Maintaining Dignity

The vast majority of care recipients are exclusively receiving unpaid care from a family member, friend, or neighbor. The rest receive a combination of family care and paid assistance, or exclusively paid formal care. Whether you’re a paid home care provider, or rely on personal assistance to meet your daily needs, or a family member caring for a loved one, the nature of the working relationship depends on mutual respect and dignity. During this week’s anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act, we’ll revisit the dynamic and complex relationship of care receiving and giving. Like this program? Please show us the love. Click here and support our non-profit journalism. Thanks!  Featuring: Camille Christian, home care provider and SEIU member Brenda Jackson, home care provider and SEIU member Patty Berne, co-founder and director, Sins Invalid Jessica Lehman, executive director, San Francisco Senior and Disability Action Kenzi Robi, president, San Francisco IHSS (In Home Supportive Services) Public Authority Governing Body Rachel Stewart, queer disabled woman passionate about disability and employment issues Alana Theriault, disability benefits counselor in Berkeley, California Ingrid Tischer, director of development, Disability Rights Education & Defense Fund (DREDF) Alta Mae Stevens, in-home caregiver Credits Host: Laura Flynn Contributing Producers: Alice Wong and Stephanie Guyer-Stevens Photo Credits: Alice Wong, Stephanie Guyer-Stevens Music Credit: Dexter Britain: The Time To Run (Finale), Gillicuddy: Adventure, Darling, Steve Combs: March, Jason Shaw: Running Waters, Jared C. Balogh: BRICK BY BRICK DAY BY DAY, Jared C. Balogh: INCREMENTS TOWARDS SERENITY, Nheap: Crossings, Cherly KaCherly: The Hungry Garden, Trio Metrik: Vogelperspektive, Kevin MacLeod: Faster Does It Segments excerpted from full show above Choreography of Care Making Contact’s Community Storytelling Fellow, Alice Wong asks, how do people with disabilities who rely on personal assistance negotiate their relationships with the people that assist them? And how does that inform their sense of independence or interdependence with others? In this next story from the San Francisco Bay Area of California, Wong searches for answers. (see Alice’s story transcript below) A Lifetime of Caregiving: Mom and Uncle Harold Most often family members are the ones that step up and provide care when a parent or loved one needs it. According to the Family Caregiver Alliance, 78 percent of care beneficiaries receive assistance from a family member, friend, or neighbor. Alta Mae Stevens is 87 years old. From the moment she married she’s been caring for one person or another. Her daughter Stephanie Guyer-Stevens talks to her about what a lifetime of caregiving has meant to her. Resources: UCSF: UCSF Study Projects Need for 2.5M More Long-Term Care Workers by 2030 SEIU: Longterm Care Workers Disability Rights Education & Defense Fund Disability Visibility Project Hand in Hand: The Domestic Employers Network National Disability Leadership Alliance...

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The Arrival: Trump’s Travel and Refugee Ban
Jul18

The Arrival: Trump’s Travel and Refugee Ban

After the US Supreme Court’s June 2018 ruling on Trump’s travel ban, we’ll discuss how the new order impacts people from affected, Muslim-majority countries. We also talk about what’s different about the new ban and how to fight it. We begin with the story of a woman who was in flight to the US when President Trump signed his first travel ban. Special thanks to the Stanford Storytelling Project and State of the Human podcast Managing Producer, Jake Warga. Image Credit: Deigo Cupolo – Creative Commons Like this program? Please show us the love. Click here and support our non-profit journalism. Thanks!  Featuring: Nisrin Abdelrahman, Stanford PhD student in Anthropology Zahra Billoo, Civil Rights Attorney and Executive Director of the Council on American-Islamic Relations, San Francisco Bay Area Chapter Credits: Host: Salima Hamirani Producers: Anita Johnson, Monica Lopez, Salima Hamirani Contributing Producers: Nisrin Abdelrahman, Helvia Taina, An-Li Herring, Eileen William, Marie Choi, R.J. Lozada Executive Director: Lisa Rudman Audience Engagement Director/Web Editor: Sabine Blaizin Development Associate: Vera Tykulsker Music: “Low Light Switch”,  Blue Dot Sessions “Long Transfer 2006 Rework”,  Phour Trakk “RSPN”, Blank Kytt More Information: Council on American-Islamic Relations, San Francisco Bay Area chapter U.S. SUPREME COURT RULING ON MUSLIM BAN 3.0: WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW Executive Order 13780—Protecting the Nation From Foreign Terrorist Entry Into the United States TRUMP, PRESIDENT OF U.S. V. INT L REFUGEE ASSISTANCE TRUMP, PRESIDENT OF U.S. V. HAWAII TRUMP, PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES, ET AL.v. HAWAII ET AL. Stanford Storytelling Project MuslimARC VOX Article...

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Patrisse Khan-Cullors, “When They Call You A Terrorist”
Mar20

Patrisse Khan-Cullors, “When They Call You A Terrorist”

Patrisse Khan-Cullors, co-founder of Black Lives Matter and the author of the new book, WHEN THEY CALL YOU A TERRORIST: A Black Lives Matter Memoir, a meaningful, empowering account of strength and resilience. In this conversation, hosted by long-time organizer Cat Brooks, we hear Patrisse Cullors’ insights on Black liberation, police terrorism and the criminalization of Black activism in America. WHEN THEY CALL YOU A TERRORIST takes an intimate look at Cullors’ time growing up in Van Nuys, California, surrounded by a devoted family and supportive friends, and weaves her experiences into the larger picture of how predominantly Black and Latino neighborhoods are under constant systemic attack. From a hostile police presence, to disproportionate punitive action, to lack of basic social and medical services, Cullors and co-author asha bandele show how lack of personal security and dignity makes daily life an act of survival. Like this program? Please show us the love. Click here and support our non-profit journalism. Thanks! Featuring: Patrisse Khan-Cullors and Cat Brooks Credits: Host: Anita Johnson Producers: Anita Johnson, Marie Choi, Monica Lopez, R.J. Lozada Executive Director: Lisa Rudman Audience Engagement Director/Web Editor: Sabine Blaizin Development Associate: Vera Tykulsker More Information: Patrisse Khan-Cullors TEDTalk Interview LA...

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I Am Not Your Negro: James Baldwin
Feb21

I Am Not Your Negro: James Baldwin

Master filmmaker Raoul Peck envisions the book James Baldwin never finished, Remember This House. The result is a radical, up-to-the-minute examination of race in America, using Baldwin’s original words and flood of rich archival material. I Am Not Your Negro is a journey into black history that connects the past of the Civil Rights movement to the present of #BlackLivesMatter. It is a film that questions black representation in Hollywood and beyond. And, ultimately, by confronting the deeper connections between the lives and assassination of Medgar Evers, Malcolm X and Martin Luther King Jr., Baldwin and Peck have produced a work that challenges the very definition of what America stands for. Thank You’s and Credits: Master filmmaker Raoul Peck, Magnolia Pictures, and Amazon Studios. Like this program? Please show us the love. Click here and support our non-profit journalism. Thanks! Featuring: Film Participants: James Baldwin, Harry Belafonte, Dick Cavett, Marlon Brando, Robert F. Kennedy, Martin Luther King Jr. Medgar Evers, Malcolm X and many more Credits: Host: Anita Johnson Producers: Anita Johnson, Marie Choi, Monica Lopez, R.J. Lozada Executive Director: Lisa Rudman Audience Engagement Director/Web Editor: Sabine Blaizin Development Associate: Vera Tykulsker More Information: http://www.iamnotyournegrofilm.com/ http://www.magnoliapictures.com/ https://studios.amazon.com/ I Am Not Your Negro on YouTube James Baldwin: The Last Interview: and other Conversations (The Last Interview Series) Interview with James Baldwin on Sexuality – Richard Goldstein...

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Wealth Inequity and Universal Basic Income
Jan17

Wealth Inequity and Universal Basic Income

When Donald Trump was sworn in as the 45th president of the United states, the wealth gap between rich and poor was already very wide. The top 10% of families — those who had at least $942,000 — held 76% of total wealth. The average amount of wealth in this group was $4 million. And the entire bottom half of the population had just 1% of the total wealth pie, this gap continues to rise and when the statistical scope accounts for race, the disparity worsens. Chuck Collins, Director of the Program On Inequality at the Institute for Policy Studies, traces the history of the wealth gap in his work. Is Universal Basic Income, or UBI, an answer to the wealth gap, and to poverty? Or is it the tech community’s neoliberal dream? For this answer we hear from the producers from Upstream. Special thanks to Upstream Podcast: Upstreampodcast.org. Like this program? Please show us the love. Click here and support our non-profit journalism. Thanks! Featuring: Chuck Collins, Director of the Program On Inequality at the Institute for Policy Studies Julianna Bidadanure – Assistant Professor in Political Philosophy at Stanford University Doug Henwood – Economist, Journalist Credits: Host: R.J. Lozada Producers: Anita Johnson, Marie Choi, Monica Lopez, R.J. Lozada Upstream Podcast Producers: Della Z Duncan, Robert R. Raymond Executive Director: Lisa Rudman Audience Engagement Director/Web Editor: Sabine Blaizin Development Associate: Vera Tykulsker More Information: Born on Third Base, by Chuck Collins Inequality.org United for a Fair Economy Upstream Podcast The Color of Money – Mehrsa Baradaran  Economic Policy Institute, The Racial Wealth...

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