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Jane Mayer on the Hidden Billionaires of the Radical Right
Jun22

Jane Mayer on the Hidden Billionaires of the Radical Right

Who is Charles Koch–really? Who are the members of “the Network”?—a semi-secret group assembled by the Koch brothers? How are the superrich’s priorities transforming American society? Journalist Jane Mayer spent several years searching for some of those answers, and her new book is titled Dark Money, the Hidden History of the Billionaires. Mayer is interviewed by Atlantic magazine editor-in-chief James Bennet.  Featuring: Jane Mayer, author of Dark Money, the Hidden History of the Billionaires James Bennet, Atlantic Magazine editor-in-chief Credits Host: Andrew Stelzer Special thanks: Politics and Prose Bookstore & Coffeehouse More information   Dark Money: The Hidden History of the Billionaires Behind the Rise of the Radical Right Jane Mayer on Dark Money Politics and Prose Bookstore & Coffeehouse How the Kochtopus Went After a Reporter Koch Industries Americans for...

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Caring Relationships: Negotiating Meaning and Maintaining Dignity
Apr13

Caring Relationships: Negotiating Meaning and Maintaining Dignity

The vast majority of care recipients are exclusively receiving unpaid care from a family member, friend, or neighbor. The rest receive a combination of family care and paid assistance, or exclusively paid formal care. Whether you’re a paid home care provider, or rely on personal assistance to meet your daily needs, or a family member caring for a loved one, the nature of the working relationship depends on mutual respect and dignity. On this edition of Making Contact, which features a segment by our Community Storytelling Fellow Alice Wong, we’ll explore the dynamic and complex relationship of care receiving and giving. (Alice’s story transcript below) Featuring: Camille Christian, home care provider and SEIU member Brenda Jackson, home care provider and SEIU member Patty Berne, co-founder and director, Sins Invalid Jessica Lehman, executive director, San Francisco Senior and Disability Action Kenzi Robi, president, San Francisco IHSS (In Home Supportive Services) Public Authority Governing Body Rachel Stewart, queer disabled woman passionate about disability and employment issues Alana Theriault, disability benefits counselor in Berkeley, California Ingrid Tischer, director of development, Disability Rights Education & Defense Fund (DREDF) Alta Mae Stevens, in-home caregiver Credits Host: Laura Flynn Contributing Producers: Alice Wong and Stephanie Guyer-Stevens Photo Credits: Alice Wong, Stephanie Guyer-Stevens Music Credit: Dexter Britain: The Time To Run (Finale), Gillicuddy: Adventure, Darling, Steve Combs: March, Jason Shaw: Running Waters, Jared C. Balogh: BRICK BY BRICK DAY BY DAY, Jared C. Balogh: INCREMENTS TOWARDS SERENITY, Nheap: Crossings, Cherly KaCherly: The Hungry Garden, Trio Metrik: Vogelperspektive, Kevin MacLeod: Faster Does It Segments excerpted from full show above Choreography of Care Making Contact’s Community Storytelling Fellow, Alice Wong asks, how do people with disabilities who rely on personal assistance negotiate their relationships with the people that assist them? And how does that inform their sense of independence or interdependence with others? In this next story from the San Francisco Bay Area of California, Wong searches for answers. (see Alice’s story transcript below) A Lifetime of Caregiving: Mom and Uncle Harold Most often family members are the ones that step up and provide care when a parent or loved one needs it. According to the Family Caregiver Alliance, 78 percent of care beneficiaries receive assistance from a family member, friend, or neighbor. Alta Mae Stevens is 87 years old. From the moment she married she’s been caring for one person or another. Her daughter Stephanie Guyer-Stevens talks to her about what a lifetime of caregiving has meant to her. Resources: UCSF: UCSF Study Projects Need for 2.5M More Long-Term Care Workers by 2030 SEIU: Longterm Care Workers Disability Rights Education & Defense Fund Disability Visibility Project Hand in Hand: The Domestic Employers Network National Disability Leadership Alliance Senior and...

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The true cost of fast fashion: a look inside Los Angeles sweatshops
Mar30

The true cost of fast fashion: a look inside Los Angeles sweatshops

Los Angeles’ garment district is notorious for sweatshop conditions, abuse, and the outright theft of earned wages. Yet the name-brand clothes that some of us are wearing right now, may have been produced in factories like these. On this edition of Making Contact we’ll take you on a trip through LA’s garment district. Featuring: Irma, Eulalia, garment workers Marissa Nuncio, the director of LA’s Garment Worker Center  Credits Host: Monica Lopez Contributing  Producers: RE:Work Radio, Stefanie Ritoper and Saba Waheed More information RE:Work Radio, Episode 14 Los Callejones UCLA Labor Center The Garment Worker’s...

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Unstoppable: The Fight for 15
Mar23

Unstoppable: The Fight for 15

In 2012, fast food workers in NYC kicked off a movement that has exceeded all expectations, and changed the conversation about the minimum wage. On this edition, low paid workers tell the story of the fight for 15, the exploding nationwide movement for fair wages. Featuring: Alvin Major, KFC employee and original NYC striker Richard Wilson, Walmart employee Bernardo Monteo, Chanda Roberts, Jayla Mosley; fast food workers Mary Kay Henry, SEIU President Ken Jacobs, chair of the UC Berkeley Center for Labor Research and Education Thomas Geoghegan, author of “Only One Thing Can Save Us: Why America Needs A New Kind of Labor Movement“ More information Fight for 15 Fast Food Forward Clocking In Only One Thing Can Save Us: Why America Needs A New Kind of Labor Movement“ by Thomas Geoghegan States Move to Roll Back City Minimum-Wage Raises Living Wage Mandate Preemption Act Summer For Respect on Soundcloud Voices of Walmart California’s $15 Minimum Wage Initiative Is Likely Headed to Voters Columbia University Interdisciplinary Center for Innovative Theory and Empirics (INCITE) 14 Cities States Approved 15 Minimum Wage in 2015 How New York’s “Fight for $15” Launched a National Movement  The Care Gap Income Inequality Is A Health Hazard Why Skills Are Not Enough to Land a Job Last word: the Faces of...

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China’s Reproductive Regime: Mei Fong & Barbara Demick on China’s one child policy
Mar02

China’s Reproductive Regime: Mei Fong & Barbara Demick on China’s one child policy

January 2016 marked the end of China’s one child policy—a regime of family planning policies and enforcement that scarred generations of parents and children. On this edition of Making Contact, China correspondent Gady Epstein speaks with Mei Fong, author of One Child:The Story of China’s Most Radical Experiment, and Barbara Demick, journalist and former Beijing bureau chief for the Los Angeles Times. Featuring: Mei Fong, author of One Child:The Story of China’s Most Radical Experiment Barbara Demick, , journalist and former Beijing bureau chief for the Los Angeles Times Gady Epstein, China correspondent for The Economist. Credits Host: Monica Lopez Producers: Laura Flynn, Monica Lopez, Andrew Stelzer, Jasmin Lopez Original Content Producers: New America NYC and ChinaFile Special Thanks: Mary Wohlford Foundation for funding our Reproductive Justice beat More information New America NYC Mei Fong, author and...

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These photos show what it’s like to live in a tent city
Jan28

These photos show what it’s like to live in a tent city

This slideshow requires JavaScript. With rising rents around the country and decreased access to housing services, many people are looking for ways to aid the country’s growing homeless population. On this week’s show we look at tent cities that have emerged in Seattle and Portland. Scroll through the photos to get a better idea of life in Seattle’s Nickelsville and Portland’s Dignity Village. Listen to reporter Sara Bernard’s report below and the entire show here. Nicklesville Pushes Seattle Towards Acceptance of Tent Cities Seattle is one of the only cities in the nation to have passed an ordinance formally sanctioning tent cities. Last fall, three new encampments were built on city land, with city permits and city dollars. A lot of that success can be chalked up to Nickelsville, one of Seattle’s formal tent encampments, which has been around since 2008. Reporter Sara Bernard visited Nicklesville, and brings us this report....

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