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Dr. Ibram X. Kendi – Stamped from the Beginning: The Definitive History of Racist Ideas in America
Jun21

Dr. Ibram X. Kendi – Stamped from the Beginning: The Definitive History of Racist Ideas in America

Some Americans cling desperately to the myth that we are living in a post-racial society, that the election of the first Black president spelled the doom of racism. In fact, racist thought is alive and well in America – more sophisticated and more insidious than ever. And as award-winning historian Ibram X. Kendi argues in Stamped from the Beginning, if we have any hope of grappling with this stark reality, we must first understand how racist ideas were developed, disseminated, and enshrined in American society. In this deeply researched and fast-moving narrative, Kendi chronicles the entire story of anti-Black racist ideas and their staggering power over the course of American history. Stamped from the Beginning uses the life stories of five major American intellectuals to offer a window into the contentious debates between assimilationists and segregationists and between racists and antiracists. From Puritan minister Cotton Mather to Thomas Jefferson, from fiery abolitionist William Lloyd Garrison to brilliant scholar W.E.B. Du Bois to legendary anti-prison activist Angela Davis, Kendi shows how and why some of our leading proslavery and pro-civil rights thinkers have challenged or helped cement racist ideas in America. Special Thanks to KPFA for use of the audio. Like this program? Please show us the love. Click here and support our non-profit journalism. Thanks! Featuring: Dr. Ibram X. Kendi, Professor of History and International Relations, and the Founding Director of the Anti-Racist Research and Policy Center at American University Credits: Host: Anita Johnson Producers: Anita Johnson, Marie Choi, Monica Lopez, R.J. Lozada, Andrew Stelzer Executive Director: Lisa Rudman Audience Engagement Director/Web Editor: Sabine Blaizin Development Associate: Vera Tykulsker Music: Show opener: Quiet Orchestra – My Friend Show close: Blue Dot Sessions – Grand Caravan More Information: Dr. Ibram Stamped From The Beginning Book...

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Spies of Mississippi
Apr19

Spies of Mississippi

Spies of Mississippi is a journey into the world of informants, infiltrators, and agent provocateurs in the heart of Dixie. The film tells the story of a secret spy agency formed by the state of Mississippi to preserve segregation and maintain “the Mississippi way of life,” white supremacy, during the 1950s and ‘60s. The Mississippi State Sovereignty Commission (MSSC) evolved from a predominantly public relations agency to a full-fledged spy operation, spying on over 87,000 Americans over the course of a decade. The Commission employed a network of investigators and informants, including African Americans, to help infiltrate some of the largest Black organizations like National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) and The Congress of Racial Equality (CORE). The MSSC was granted broad powers to investigate private citizens and organizations, keep secret files, make arrests, and compel testimony for a state that, as civil rights activist Lawrence Guyot says in the film, “was committed to an apartheid system that would make South Africa blush.” The film reveals the full scope and impact of the Commission, including its links to private white supremacist organizations, its ties to investigative agencies in other states, and even its program to bankroll the opposition to civil rights legislation in Washington D.C. Weaving in chilling footage of Ku Klux Klan rallies and government propaganda films alongside rare images and interviews from the period, Spies of Mississippi tracks the Commission’s hidden role in many of the most important chapters of the civil rights movement, including the integration of the University of Mississippi, the assassination of Medgar Evers, and the KKK murders of three civil rights workers in 1964. Like this program? Please show us the love. Click here to support our non-profit journalism and be sure to join our newsletter. Thanks! Featuring: Margaret Block Rick Bowers Kenneth Dean Ralph Eubanks Lawrence Guyot Edwin King Robert Luckett Neil McMillen Jerry Mitchell Bob Moses Janet Moses Congressman Bennie Thompson Hollis Watkins Governor William Winter Credits: Filmmakers: Dawn Porter and Rick Bowers Radio Adaptation + Host: Anita Johnson Producers: Anita Johnson, Marie Choi, Monica Lopez, R.J. Lozada Executive Director: Lisa Rudman Audience Engagement Director/Web Editor: Sabine Blaizin Development Associate: Vera Tykulsker   More Information: SPIES OF MISSISSIPPI aired on Germany’s ARTE and PBS’s Independent Lens series in 2014. The film was directed and produced by Dawn Porter and executive produced by LOOKS TV and Martina Haubrich. The film was inspired by a book written for young adults by Rick Bowers, who was also a writer for the documentary. You can order a DVD of the documentary on shopPBS.com. There is also a free app with bonus footage, unseen interviews, interactive maps...

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Caring Relationships: Negotiating Meaning and Maintaining Dignity ENCORE
Jan31

Caring Relationships: Negotiating Meaning and Maintaining Dignity ENCORE

In this disturbing era of Trump, we revisit our encore show on disability rights. During his campaign in November 2016, Trump mocked NY Times reporter Serge Kovaleski, who had chronic joint disease that limits his arm movements. On this edition of Making Contact, we’ll explore the dynamic and complex relationship of care receiving, giving, and disability rights. The vast majority of care recipients are exclusively receiving unpaid care from a family member, friend, or neighbor. The rest receive a combination of family care and paid assistance, or exclusively paid formal care. Whether you’re a paid home care provider, or rely on personal assistance to meet your daily needs, or a family member caring for a loved one, the nature of the working relationship depends on mutual respect and dignity. This show features a special segment by Making Contact Storytelling Fellow Alice Wong. Find out more about the fellowship here. Like this program? Please show us the love. Click here and support our non-profit journalism. Thanks! Featuring: Camille Christian, home care provider and SEIU member Brenda Jackson, home care provider and SEIU member Patty Berne, co-founder and director, Sins Invalid Kenzi Robi, president, San Francisco IHSS (In Home Supportive Services) Public Authority Governing Body Jessica Lehman, executive director, San Francisco Senior and Disability Action Rachel Stewart,  is a queer disabled woman who is passionate about disability and employment issues Alana Theriault, disability benefits counselor in Berkeley, California Ingrid Tischer, director of development, Disability Rights Education & Defense Fund (DREDF) Alta Mae Stevens, in-home caregiver Alice Wong, disabled journalist and Making Contact’s 6th Community Storytelling Fellow Credits: Host: Laura Flynn Producers: Laura Flynn, Monica Lopez, Jasmin Lopez Contributing Producers: Alice Wong, Stephanie Guyer-Stevens Executive Director: Lisa Rudman Audience Engagement Director/Web Editor: Sabine Blaizin Development Associate: Vera Tykulsker Music: Dexter Britain: The Time To Run (Finale)    Gillicuddy: Adventure, Darling Steve Combs: March Jason Shaw: Running Waters Jared C. Balogh: BRICK BY BRICK DAY BY DAY Jared C. Balogh: INCREMENTS TOWARDS SERENITY  Nheap: Crossings Cherly KaCherly: The Hungry Garden Trio Metrik: Vogelperspektive Kevin MacLeod: Faster Does It More Information: UCSF: UCSF Study Projects Need for 2.5M More Long-Term Care Workers by 2030 SEIU: Longterm Care Workers Disability Rights Education & Defense Fund Disability Visibility Project Hand in Hand: The Domestic Employers Network National Disability Leadership Alliance Senior and Disability Action Sins Invalid San Francisco In Home Supportive Services Public Authority Family Caregiver...

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Fallen Heroes of 2016
Dec26

Fallen Heroes of 2016

Thousands of local social justice organizers passed away this year. People doing crucial work in their communities, whose deaths didn’t make the headlines.  On this edition of Making Contact, we’ll hear about some of the fallen heroes of 2016. Like this program? Please show us. Click here and support our non-profit journalism. Thanks! Can you recognize the title & Fallen Artist of each song in this show?  We’ll list their names and songs in our newsletter.  Don’t miss the answers in January — Sign Up Here. Featuring: Joani Blank, Founder of Good Vibrations Carol Queen, Sexologist Darren Seals, Ferguson Activist Ebony Williams, Chosen Diamonds Mentor Berta Caceres, Co-Founder of the Council of Popular & Indigenous Organizations of Honduras (COPINH) Silvio Carillo, Journalist and Nephew of Berta Caceres Cedric Robinson, UC Santa Barbara Professor and Author of Black Marxism: The Making of the Black Radical Tradition Robin Kelley, UCLA Black Studies and History Professor Tom Rainey-Smith, Amnesty International Korea Coordinator, speaking about Baek Nam-gi activist farmer in South Korea Luis de la Garza, Member of La Colectiva Horacio N. Roque Ramirez, Queer Latin@ Oral Historian and with a postsctript, Ben Bagdikian, Washington Post Editor who helped publish The Pentagon Papers and was dean of the Graduate School of Journalism at the University of California, Berkeley from ’85-’88. He was perhaps best known as the author of “The Media Monopoly” (1983), which warned that freedom of expression and independent journalism were threatened by the consolidation of news and entertainment outlets in a shrinking circle of corporate owners. Credits: Host: Andrew Stelzer Producers: Anita Johnson, Marie Choi, Monica Lopez, R.J. Lozada, Andrew Stelzer Executive Director: Lisa Rudman Audience Engagement Director/Web Editor: Sabine Blaizin Development Associate: Vera Tykulsker   More Information: Council of Popular & Indigenous Organizations of Honduras Cedric J. Robinson: the Making of a Black Radical Intellectual Horacio N. Roque Ramírez: Presente! Robin D. G. Kelley Joani Blank Good Vibrations Carol Queen Justice for Berta Silvio Carrillo The Malleable Memory of Darren Seals Who killed Ferguson activist Darren Seals? Who Killed Darren Seals and Why Farmer Baek Nam-gi Dies in South Korea After South Korean farmer’s death, family continues fight for justice Berta Cáceres, Honduran human rights and environment activist, murdered Black Marxism: The Making of the Black Radical Tradition In Memoriam: Horacio N. Roque Ramirez Radical Thought: Cedric J. Robinson Korean farmer Baek Nam Gi-Korean critically injured by police water cannons How Muhammad Ali influenced the Civil Rights Movement The Media Monopoly 6th Edition by Ben H. Bagdikian Goldman Prize Recipient Berta Cáceres...

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#SayHerName: Black Love in Action
Jul06

#SayHerName: Black Love in Action

In cities across the country, black women – many of whom have been on the front lines of the Movement for Black Lives – are lifting up the names of their sisters killed by police. This March, Manolia Charlotin, a multimedia journalist with the The Media Consortium, and Cat Brooks, artist and organizer with Oakland’s Anti Police-Terror Project sat down at a community event in San Francisco to talk about Say Her Name and what it looks like to build a movement that centers black women. Jamison Robinson, Yuvette Henderson’s brother, talks about the difference it makes when a community comes together to demand justice after the police kill someone.  Featuring: Jamison Robinson, brother of Yuvette Henderson Manolia Charlotin, journalist with The Media Consortium Cat Brooks, artist and organizer with the Anti Police-Terror Project Credits Host: Marie Choi Music: “Railroad’s Whisky Co.” by Jahzzar, “Light, Livid” by Plurabelle, “We Comin’” by Reverend Sekou and the Holy Ghost, “Derailed” by Blue Dot Sessions, Nicolo Scolieri, music selector for the Yuvette Henderson story:  “Unknown Cocek Tune” by Choba, “Tikifite” by Noura Mint Seyma, “Improvisation” by Dave Nelson, “All Our Clocks are Dying” by Ergo Phizmiz Sound Engineers: NaRayan Khalsa, Alexandra Toledo, Clara Lindstrom and Britta Conroy-Randall from The California Institute for Integral Studies’ Public Programs Photo Credits: “Jamison and Yuvette at the BART Station, going to see Disney on Ice.” Photo provided by Jamison Robinson More information Say Her Name, African American Policy Forum Anti-Police Terror Project Black Lives Matter “Making Black Lives Matter” feature by Darwin Bond Graham for the East Bay...

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Resurrected: Formerly Incarcerated Change-Makers
Nov11

Resurrected: Formerly Incarcerated Change-Makers

In order to reduce prison over-crowding the Justice Department is releasing about 6,000 non-violent inmates early. Darris Young is working to make sure upon release individuals can successfully transition after incarceration. On this edition of Making Contact we’ll meet more individuals like Darris who also went to prison, came out and dedicated their lives to making a positive difference. Featuring: Frankie V. Guzman, Attorney at the National Center for Youth Law Frederick Hutson, Founder/CEO Pigeonly Clemmie Greenlee, founder of the Nashville Peacemakers Darris Young, Local Organizer at the Ella Baker Center for Human Rights Credits Host: Laura Flynn Music by: Indian Wells: Alcantara, The Gateless Gate: Endless Grey, Steve Combs: Descent and March, Cousin Silas / Black Hill: Cousin Silas & Black Hill – Sand of the South More information National Center for Youth Law Ella Baker Center Nashville Peace and Justice Center...

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