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Caring Relationships: Negotiating Meaning and Maintaining Dignity ENCORE
Jan31

Caring Relationships: Negotiating Meaning and Maintaining Dignity ENCORE

In this disturbing era of Trump, we revisit our encore show on disability rights. During his campaign in November 2016, Trump mocked NY Times reporter Serge Kovaleski, who had chronic joint disease that limits his arm movements. On this edition of Making Contact, we’ll explore the dynamic and complex relationship of care receiving, giving, and disability rights. The vast majority of care recipients are exclusively receiving unpaid care from a family member, friend, or neighbor. The rest receive a combination of family care and paid assistance, or exclusively paid formal care. Whether you’re a paid home care provider, or rely on personal assistance to meet your daily needs, or a family member caring for a loved one, the nature of the working relationship depends on mutual respect and dignity. This show features a special segment by Making Contact Storytelling Fellow Alice Wong. Find out more about the fellowship here. Like this program? Please show us the love. Click here and support our non-profit journalism. Thanks! Featuring: Camille Christian, home care provider and SEIU member Brenda Jackson, home care provider and SEIU member Patty Berne, co-founder and director, Sins Invalid Kenzi Robi, president, San Francisco IHSS (In Home Supportive Services) Public Authority Governing Body Jessica Lehman, executive director, San Francisco Senior and Disability Action Rachel Stewart,  is a queer disabled woman who is passionate about disability and employment issues Alana Theriault, disability benefits counselor in Berkeley, California Ingrid Tischer, director of development, Disability Rights Education & Defense Fund (DREDF) Alta Mae Stevens, in-home caregiver Alice Wong, disabled journalist and Making Contact’s 6th Community Storytelling Fellow Credits: Host: Laura Flynn Producers: Laura Flynn, Monica Lopez, Jasmin Lopez Contributing Producers: Alice Wong, Stephanie Guyer-Stevens Executive Director: Lisa Rudman Audience Engagement Director/Web Editor: Sabine Blaizin Development Associate: Vera Tykulsker Music: Dexter Britain: The Time To Run (Finale)    Gillicuddy: Adventure, Darling Steve Combs: March Jason Shaw: Running Waters Jared C. Balogh: BRICK BY BRICK DAY BY DAY Jared C. Balogh: INCREMENTS TOWARDS SERENITY  Nheap: Crossings Cherly KaCherly: The Hungry Garden Trio Metrik: Vogelperspektive Kevin MacLeod: Faster Does It More Information: UCSF: UCSF Study Projects Need for 2.5M More Long-Term Care Workers by 2030 SEIU: Longterm Care Workers Disability Rights Education & Defense Fund Disability Visibility Project Hand in Hand: The Domestic Employers Network National Disability Leadership Alliance Senior and Disability Action Sins Invalid San Francisco In Home Supportive Services Public Authority Family Caregiver...

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Fallen Heroes of 2016
Dec26

Fallen Heroes of 2016

Thousands of local social justice organizers passed away this year. People doing crucial work in their communities, whose deaths didn’t make the headlines.  On this edition of Making Contact, we’ll hear about some of the fallen heroes of 2016. Like this program? Please show us. Click here and support our non-profit journalism. Thanks! Can you recognize the title & Fallen Artist of each song in this show?  We’ll list their names and songs in our newsletter.  Don’t miss the answers in January — Sign Up Here. Featuring: Joani Blank, Founder of Good Vibrations Carol Queen, Sexologist Darren Seals, Ferguson Activist Ebony Williams, Chosen Diamonds Mentor Berta Caceres, Co-Founder of the Council of Popular & Indigenous Organizations of Honduras (COPINH) Silvio Carillo, Journalist and Nephew of Berta Caceres Cedric Robinson, UC Santa Barbara Professor and Author of Black Marxism: The Making of the Black Radical Tradition Robin Kelley, UCLA Black Studies and History Professor Tom Rainey-Smith, Amnesty International Korea Coordinator, speaking about Baek Nam-gi activist farmer in South Korea Luis de la Garza, Member of La Colectiva Horacio N. Roque Ramirez, Queer Latin@ Oral Historian and with a postsctript, Ben Bagdikian, Washington Post Editor who helped publish The Pentagon Papers and was dean of the Graduate School of Journalism at the University of California, Berkeley from ’85-’88. He was perhaps best known as the author of “The Media Monopoly” (1983), which warned that freedom of expression and independent journalism were threatened by the consolidation of news and entertainment outlets in a shrinking circle of corporate owners. Credits: Host: Andrew Stelzer Producers: Anita Johnson, Marie Choi, Monica Lopez, R.J. Lozada, Andrew Stelzer Executive Director: Lisa Rudman Audience Engagement Director/Web Editor: Sabine Blaizin Development Associate: Vera Tykulsker   More Information: Council of Popular & Indigenous Organizations of Honduras Cedric J. Robinson: the Making of a Black Radical Intellectual Horacio N. Roque Ramírez: Presente! Robin D. G. Kelley Joani Blank Good Vibrations Carol Queen Justice for Berta Silvio Carrillo The Malleable Memory of Darren Seals Who killed Ferguson activist Darren Seals? Who Killed Darren Seals and Why Farmer Baek Nam-gi Dies in South Korea After South Korean farmer’s death, family continues fight for justice Berta Cáceres, Honduran human rights and environment activist, murdered Black Marxism: The Making of the Black Radical Tradition In Memoriam: Horacio N. Roque Ramirez Radical Thought: Cedric J. Robinson Korean farmer Baek Nam Gi-Korean critically injured by police water cannons How Muhammad Ali influenced the Civil Rights Movement The Media Monopoly 6th Edition by Ben H. Bagdikian Goldman Prize Recipient Berta Cáceres...

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#SayHerName: Black Love in Action
Jul06

#SayHerName: Black Love in Action

In cities across the country, black women – many of whom have been on the front lines of the Movement for Black Lives – are lifting up the names of their sisters killed by police. This March, Manolia Charlotin, a multimedia journalist with the The Media Consortium, and Cat Brooks, artist and organizer with Oakland’s Anti Police-Terror Project sat down at a community event in San Francisco to talk about Say Her Name and what it looks like to build a movement that centers black women. Jamison Robinson, Yuvette Henderson’s brother, talks about the difference it makes when a community comes together to demand justice after the police kill someone.  Featuring: Jamison Robinson, brother of Yuvette Henderson Manolia Charlotin, journalist with The Media Consortium Cat Brooks, artist and organizer with the Anti Police-Terror Project Credits Host: Marie Choi Music: “Railroad’s Whisky Co.” by Jahzzar, “Light, Livid” by Plurabelle, “We Comin’” by Reverend Sekou and the Holy Ghost, “Derailed” by Blue Dot Sessions, Nicolo Scolieri, music selector for the Yuvette Henderson story:  “Unknown Cocek Tune” by Choba, “Tikifite” by Noura Mint Seyma, “Improvisation” by Dave Nelson, “All Our Clocks are Dying” by Ergo Phizmiz Sound Engineers: NaRayan Khalsa, Alexandra Toledo, Clara Lindstrom and Britta Conroy-Randall from The California Institute for Integral Studies’ Public Programs Photo Credits: “Jamison and Yuvette at the BART Station, going to see Disney on Ice.” Photo provided by Jamison Robinson More information Say Her Name, African American Policy Forum Anti-Police Terror Project Black Lives Matter “Making Black Lives Matter” feature by Darwin Bond Graham for the East Bay...

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Resurrected: Formerly Incarcerated Change-Makers
Nov11

Resurrected: Formerly Incarcerated Change-Makers

In order to reduce prison over-crowding the Justice Department is releasing about 6,000 non-violent inmates early. Darris Young is working to make sure upon release individuals can successfully transition after incarceration. On this edition of Making Contact we’ll meet more individuals like Darris who also went to prison, came out and dedicated their lives to making a positive difference. Featuring: Frankie V. Guzman, Attorney at the National Center for Youth Law Frederick Hutson, Founder/CEO Pigeonly Clemmie Greenlee, founder of the Nashville Peacemakers Darris Young, Local Organizer at the Ella Baker Center for Human Rights Credits Host: Laura Flynn Music by: Indian Wells: Alcantara, The Gateless Gate: Endless Grey, Steve Combs: Descent and March, Cousin Silas / Black Hill: Cousin Silas & Black Hill – Sand of the South More information National Center for Youth Law Ella Baker Center Nashville Peace and Justice Center...

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Getting Out: the journey out of prison

Nationally, American prisons release more than 650,000 people into society every year. That’s equivalent to the entire population of Memphis or Boston.  On this edition, producer Aaron Mendelson followed ex-prisoner Kevin Tindall on his journey out of prison. Special thanks to Claire Schoen and the University of California Berkeley, School of Journalism. Featuring:    Gordon Brown, ex-prisoner Monta Kevin Tindall, ex-prisoner Jerry Elster, ex-prisoner Tom Gorham, Program Director Options Recovery Services Barry Krisberg, Director of Research and Policy and Lecturer in Residence at Chief Justice Earl Warren Institute on Law and Social Policy, UC Berkeley Debra Mendoza, former parole officer, consultant More information San Quentin State Prison Pathways To Resilience Impact Hub Oakland How is Life Outside After Being in Prison for Over 20 Years? After prison building a new life means more than just doing...

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After 31 years in prison, Al Sasser is giving a voice to men still inside
Jun09

After 31 years in prison, Al Sasser is giving a voice to men still inside

My piece is everything about the relationships fostered while under the most traumatic circumstances of sensory deprivation, political pressure and uncertainty.  The reality of human confinement is extremely difficult to describe adequately.  However I will endeavor to share the Truth of our existence while we struggled to rise above it. I hope to honor each individual involved with the process of building us up. Encouraging us to discover the endless possibilities available to those of us who were willing to direct our courage in a positive way. The bonds we’ve managed and continue to maintain were previously thought to be impossible.  Contrary to those critics our relationships changed the prison culture, installed hope and made what was idealistic, realistic.  A true paradigm shift. Making Contact has provided me with an opportunity to exercise my right to be a voice in this world.  In doing so, I am able to be a channel through which many others speak their truth; many of whom otherwise would go unheard. It’s one benefit to speak, another to serve as a channel through which others can share. I’d like to offer this perception conveyed by storyteller Leslie Marmon Silko, “As with any generation the oral tradition depends upon each person listening and remembering a portion and it is Together-all of us remembering what we have heard and Together-that creates the whole story, the long story of the people.” Each person adding to the story, in the spirit of the orator, transforms the story which then belongs to all whom participate in its telling.  Through my work with Grooming for Griots, I endeavor to capture and contribute to the shaping of a people’s collective consciousness by sharing the Truth in word and deed. What stories do we share when we speak to strangers, to our children, our parents, sisters, brothers and friends? Is the degree of truth 100% or does it differ depending upon to whom we’re speaking?  Is speaking truth so difficult that we’d rather hide behind falsehood in our attempt to mask truth? It’s said that, “Truth crushed to the ground will live to rise again.”  This implies strongly that truth cannot be denied and inevitably will surface.  Truth is an absolute and backed by God. Truth exists for reasons of clarity, confidence, conviction and serves as the suit of armor which protects one from being misdirected while on the arduous journey to spread the truth and dispel myth. The truth will truly set us free from the prisons of the mind.  How will you participate in the breaking of psychological chains that stagnate progressive advances?  Speak it and Live it.  Then it...

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