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Failing Our Youth: An Inadequate Foster Care System
Feb03

Failing Our Youth: An Inadequate Foster Care System

This show takes a look at issues within the foster care system in the U.S. from the high rate of teen pregnancy to the alarming use of psychiatric medications in California’s foster care system. Featuring: Nicole Rocke, former foster youth Kyle Lafferty, the National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy Linda Bryant, Clinical Professor at New York University’s School of Social Work Benita Miller, Deputy Commissioner of Family Permanency Services at the Administration of Children’s Services Lorraine Jacobs, caseworker Yolanda Vasquez, former foster youth Adriane Fugh-Berman, Pharmacology Professor at Georgetown University’s Medical Center Bill Grimm, Attorney at National Center for Youth Law Susan Bullard David Arrendondo, Child psychiatrist Dr. Edmund Levin, at the Lincoln Child Center Nancy Forster, Therapist at the Lincoln Child Center April Rene Sanders, former foster youth and recipient of AB12 Kyle Sporleader, Statewide Legislative Coordinator for California Youth Connection (CYC) Credits: Host: Jasmin Lopez Contributing Producer: Leticia Miranda, Bay Area News Group Special thanks to the Bay Area News Group. Music: Quiet Orchestra, My Friend Jahzzar, Siesta Jahzzar, The Flowers Are Still Standing Poor Alexei, The Long Goodbye Cory Gray, Build a View Show Segments Teen Pregnancy and Foster Care Foster girls are 2.5 times more likely to become pregnant by the time they’re 19 than their peers outside of foster care. Some researchers estimate that about half the girls in foster care become pregnant in their teens. At the same time, foster care systems across the country do not have the proper resources and support systems for young women in care to learn about reproductive health and then birth and raise children. This is a story about Nicole Rocke who became pregnant at 16 in her first year living in a Brooklyn foster home. From Foster Care to College Typically turning 18 has also meant aging out of the system. So no more reimbursements to subsidize care. Studies show foster youth lacking financial support face higher rates of homelessness and incarceration; and fewer finish high school or go to college. To help ease the transition into adulthood, in 2008 the federal government allowed states to claim reimbursements for the cost of foster care to the age of 21. California’s version helped one young woman gain control of her life. Making Contact’s Laura Flynn has the story More Information Drugging Our Kids – Full documentary: http://webspecial.mercurynews.com/druggedkids/ California Youth Connection Chapin Hill at the University of Chicago: Midwest Evaluation of the Adult Functioning of Former Foster Youth Chapin Hill at the University of Chicago: Findings from the California Youth Transitions to Adulthood Study (CalYOUTH) National Conference of State Legislatures: Extending Foster Care Beyond 18 California Fostering Connections to Success: Resource page...

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Abortion Access Under Attack
Jan20

Abortion Access Under Attack

Special edition of Making Contact with guest Host, Rose Aguilar discussing reproductive health and abortion rights 43 years after Roe v. Wade. Featuring: Corrine Rivera-Fowler, deputy director of COLOR, the Colorado Organization for Latina Opportunity and Reproductive Rights Carol Joffe, professor at the Bixby Center for Global Reproductive Health at the University of California, San Francisco and author of “Dispatches from the Abortion Wars: The Cost of Fanaticism to Doctors, Patients, and the Rest of Us.” Credits Host: Rose Aguilar Producers: Laura Flynn and Jasmin Lopez Contributing Producer: Lisa Rudman Song: Alcantara by Indian Wells Photo: CC / by Steve Rhodes “Clinic defense of Planned Parenthood in San Francisco” More information COLOR (Colorado Organization for Latina Opportunity and Reproductive Rights) UCSF, Bixby Center “Dispatches from the Abortion Wars: The Cost of Fanaticism to Doctors, Patients, and the Rest of Us” RH Reality Check: Anti-Choice Legislation Mills Descend on Colorado, Report Finds...

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Abortion Access and Eroded Rights
Dec09

Abortion Access and Eroded Rights

In 1973 the Supreme Court case Roe v. Wade established the legal right to abortion in the United States. Since then, state legislative and executive bodies have battled to restrict access to abortions. Federal law banned the use of federal funds for most abortions in 1977, and public funding for abortion remains a contested issue. One recent study in Texas found that more than 200,000 women performed abortions on themselves because they weren’t able to find clinical services. From restrictive laws to a lack of information to violent attacks, the blocking of abortion access is eroding the reproductive rights of women. On this edition, we hear from women at the New Orleans Abortion Fund and Ibis Reproductive Health, as well as experiences from a doctor who provides abortions and a woman that sought abortion access in New Orleans, Louisiana. Featuring: Jessie Nieblas, New Orleans Abortion Fund Liza Fuentes, Ibis Reproductive Health Natalie, teacher in New Orleans Diary excerpt from Dr. Susan Wicklund, an abortion provider under attack, as performed for Making Contact by Words of Choice with Actor Claudia Scheider, Directed by Francesca Mantani Arkus, Created and Produced by Cindy Cooper    Credits Music: Ketsa, Will Bangs Special Thanks to The Mary Wohlford Foundation for partial funding of this program. More information http://neworleansabortionfund.org/home http://www.ibisreproductivehealth.org/ http://wordsofchoice.org/ The Toll of Violent Anti Abortion Speech ‘Roe’ Revisited: The Path From Texas to SCOTUS for HB 2 Up to 240,000 Women Have Tried to Give Themselves Abortions in Texas How Bobby Jindal Threw Reproductive Health Under the Bus for His Presidential Bid Construction of New Orleans Planned Parenthood Abortion Biz Continues Despite Protests #is100enough Photo  by Debra...

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For Undocumented Women Seeking Reproductive Healthcare, Policing and Politics Create a Maze of Barriers
Nov16

For Undocumented Women Seeking Reproductive Healthcare, Policing and Politics Create a Maze of Barriers

In September 2015, an undocumented woman arrived at a healthcare clinic outside of Houston, Texas for a routine follow-up exam. Blanca Borrego handed a false driver’s license to the receptionist at the Memorial Hermann women’s clinic upon check-in and waited to be called into the examination room with her two daughters at her side. They sat in that waiting room for two hours. Finally, when her name was called, her daughters stayed behind as she was led to an exam room where a Harris County Sheriff’s deputy was waiting for her. He handcuffed her and brought her through the clinic’s office, where her daughters waited and her eight-year-old burst into tears when she saw her mother under arrest. Her 22-year-old daughter, who has an open application for legal status through Obama’s Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, told the Houston Press that the sheriff’s deputy turned to her and said they were arresting her mom for false papers: “She’s going to get deported.”   Borrego has been released from Sheriff’s custody, and it’s likely that the arrest violates federal patient-doctor privacy laws, but charges are still pending and she risks being turned over to Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE). As Borrego’s case works through the courts, reproductive health experts in Texas are concerned that her highly publicized arrest will prevent many undocumented immigrants from seeking medical attention, with fears that they will also be delivered into ICE custody by their medical providers. National discussion about access to reproductive healthcare remains a hot topic, like the most-recent campaign to defund Planned Parenthood based on a falsified video that is supposed to show that the organization is “selling baby parts.” Planned Parenthood president Cecile Richards was called to testify before Congress where she had to defend the organization’s use of funds. During these discussions, the high stakes and numerous hurdles that undocumented immigrants face to get basic care often remain out of the spotlight. In addition to the barriers imposed by anti-abortion legislation, there are literal borders set in place that prevent many immigrants from accessing federally funded clinics. While Borrego’s arrest occurred in a Texas suburb, racial profiling and border checkpoints directly thwart many people along the U.S. and Mexico border in the Rio Grande Valley from seeking healthcare. A Nuestro Texas report shows that “Texas Latinas ages 21-64 are less likely than Latinas nationally and less likely than white or black women in Texas to have received a Pap test within the last three years.” Additionally, women living in colonias (U.S. communities along the Mexican border) are 31 percent more likely to die of cervical cancer compared to women living...

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Not Throw Away Women: Black and Indigenous Women Disrupt Violence
Sep09

Not Throw Away Women: Black and Indigenous Women Disrupt Violence

On this week’s show we’re exploring how some women have been dehumanized to the point of indifference. We’ll learn how one community is undoing the silence around the violence women of color face. We’ll also hear about how serial killers were able to hunt down mostly Black women for three decades in South Los Angeles. Then we’ll take you to the Yucatan where pregnant indigenous women struggle under a health care system failing to provide proper medical care. Featuring: Rochelle Robinson, Making Contact Fellow Kimberly Smith, community member attending Her Resilience mural project Gabrielle Rae Travis,  Her Resilience Community Outreach Coordinator Margaret Prescod founder of Black Coalition Fighting Back Serial Murders and host of KPFK’s Sojourner Truth Mirna Aracely Tuz Acosta, Safe Maternity for the Indigenous Population in East Yucatan Neyi Amparo Cime Arceo, resident of Xanlah. Thanks to the Mary Wohlford Foundation for funding towards this program. Host: Laura Flynn and Jasmin Lopez Contributing Producers: Rochelle Robinson and Karen Stefan Tenorio Featured music: Blue Dot Sessions, Farsical Slow Driver, Inside the Origami Violin, Tanguedo Trans Alp, Gnossienne N1, Gnossienne N3 Black Ant, Fater Lee Broke For Free, Night Owl Phour Trakk, Long Transfer Kai Engel, Written in Ink More information: Her Resilience Kimberly Robertson’s obituary Black Coalition Fighting Back Serial Murders Sojourner Truth Radio HBO Tales of the Grim Sleeper LA Weekly, Grim Sleeper Returns: He’s Murdering Angelenos, As Cops Hunt His DNA The Grim Sleeper timeline Nick Broomfield Sociedad Mexicana Pro Derechos de la Mujer, A.C. Accountability in Maternal and Reproductive Health: Experiences from Civil Society from India, Mexico, and Nigeria Femicide in Mexico: Mapping of Silence Archival Footage: AP, New Sketches of California Serial Killer, December 18, 2009 ABC News, Grim Sleepers Mysterious Photos Normalizing Violence Puts Black Women’s Lives at Risk Making Contact’s fellow Rochelle Robinson brings us this story exploring how violence against women, especially women of color, is so pervasive that we’re numbed into thinking it’s nothing less than normal. While the homicide rate for Black women has decreased over the years nationwide, in 2010, the rate was twice as high for Black women than all female victims combined.  In this story the first voice you’ll hear is Kimberly Smith, and then Rochelle Robinson as they talk about their own brushes with death. How Serial Killers Stalked Black Women in South Los Angeles In the 1980s in South Los Angeles more than a dozen black women were murdered. Many of these women’s bodies were found in parks, alleyways, and dumpsters.It’s believed somewhere between 3 and 5 different serial killers were targeting the South LA community in the 80s and 90s. One suspect, Lonnie Franklin, Jr.,...

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Living Downstream-creating a world free of cancer causing toxics

Renowned biologist Sandra Steingraber has made fighting environmentally induced cancers her life’s work. We hear excerpts of the documentary film, Living Downstream, which chronicles her efforts to create a world free of cancer causing toxics.

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