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Fantastic Negrito and The Last Days of Oakland
Nov21

Fantastic Negrito and The Last Days of Oakland

In the last three years, Fantastic Negrito, an Oakland-based black roots revivalist has gone from busking at bus stops to winning a Grammy and touring internationally. He’s done this by creating a unique sound — melodic hooks, primal blues-rock chords, clever lyricism, a killer falsetto, and in-your-face social consciousness. On this week’s Making Contact, we learn about Fantastic Negrito’s journey, his creative process, and how he’s utilizing his artistic platform to advocate for social justice. Special thanks to Fantastic Negrito and the Blackball Universe crew. Like this program? Please show us the love. Click here and support our non-profit journalism. Thanks! Featuring:  Fantastic Negrito, Oakland-based Black Roots Revivalist Credits: Host & Episode Producer: Eric Arnold Producers: Anita Johnson, Marie Choi, Monica Lopez, R.J. Lozada Executive Director: Lisa Rudman Audience Engagement Director/Web Editor: Sabine Blaizin Development Associate: Vera Tykulsker More Information: Fantastic Negrito’s Music Fantastic Negrito Official Page Dance of the Displaced by Eric Arnold...

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At the Intersection of Faith and Reproductive Justice
Nov15

At the Intersection of Faith and Reproductive Justice

Faith and reproductive justice: we rarely hear these words in the same sentence. Instead, we associate faith with the belligerent protester outside an abortion clinic or sex ed curriculums that shame young women for their sexuality. But what if faith could fuel a movement that supports women and families in having real choices over their lives and their bodies? On this week’s Making Contact, we head to the crossroads of faith and the struggle for reproductive justice. We’ll hear from people like Dr. Willie Parker, Toni Bond Leonard, and Katie Zeh, who are making these visions a reality. Special thanks to Center for American Progress for allowing us to broadcast excerpts of the “At the Intersection of Faith and Reproductive Justice”, a panel that took place in Washington D.C. July 2017. Thanks also to the Mary Wohlford Foundation. Like this program? Please show us the love. Click here and support our non-profit journalism. Thanks! TRANSCRIPT AVAILABLE BELOW* Featuring: Dr. Willie Parker, OB-GYN, Author, Life’s Work: A Moral Argument for Choice Toni Bond Leonard, Consultant, and Founding Mother of Reproductive Justice Katey Zeh, Writer, Strategist, and Educator LaShawn Warren, Vice President, Faith and Progressive Policy Initiative, Center for American Progress Jocelyn Frye, Senior Fellow, Center for American Progress Credits: Host & Episode Producer: Vera Tykulsker Producers: Anita Johnson, Marie Choi, Monica Lopez, R.J. Lozada Executive Director: Lisa Rudman Audience Engagement Director/Web Editor: Sabine Blaizin  More Information: VIDEO: At the Intersection of Faith and Reproductive Justice, panel by the Center for American Progress in Washington D.C. July 2017 Dr. Willie Parker ReWire articles by Toni Bond Leonard Katey Zeh American Progress Making Contact, Beyond Choice: Organizing for Reproductive Justice Making Contact, The Light Inside: Giving Birth Behind Bars Making Contact, Our Bodies, Our Stories: Reproductive Health Behind Bars  “At the Intersection of Faith and Reproductive Justice” Transcription INTRO [Vera Tykulsker VT] Faith and reproductive justice: we rarely hear these words in the same sentence.  Instead, we associate faith with the belligerent protester outside an abortion clinic or sex-ed curriculums that shame young women for their sexuality. But what if faith could fuel a movement that supports women and families in having real choices over their lives and their bodies? On this week’s Making Contact, [Dr. Willie Parker WP] “We’ve made women bystanders in their own lives.  We’ve turned them into public space.  We talk about an issue that occurs in the context of their lives and their bodies but we don’t talk to women who are at risk. We don’t talk to women who’ve had to make that decision. So one of the things we have to do is pull the cover rather than referring to people who are pro...

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I Am Not Your Negro
Nov08

I Am Not Your Negro

Master filmmaker Raoul Peck envisions the book James Baldwin never finished, Remember This House. The result is a radical, up-to-the-minute examination of race in America, using Baldwin’s original words and flood of rich archival material. I Am Not Your Negro is a journey into black history that connects the past of the Civil Rights movement to the present of #BlackLivesMatter. It is a film that questions black representation in Hollywood and beyond. And, ultimately, by confronting the deeper connections between the lives and assassination of Medgar Evers, Malcolm X and Martin Luther King Jr., Baldwin and Peck have produced a work that challenges the very definition of what America stands for. Special thanks to Master filmmaker Raoul Peck, Magnolia Pictures, and Amazon Studios. Like this program? Please show us the love. Click here and support our non-profit journalism. Thanks! Featuring: Film Participants include: James Baldwin, Harry Belafonte, Dick Cavett, Marlon Brando, Robert F. Kennedy, Martin Luther King Jr. Medgar Evers, Malcolm X and many more Credits: Host: Anita Johnson Producers: Anita Johnson, Marie Choi, Monica Lopez, R.J. Lozada, Andrew Stelzer Executive Director: Lisa Rudman Audience Engagement Director/Web Editor: Sabine Blaizin Development Associate: Vera Tykulsker More Information: I Am Not Your Negro Magnolia Pictures Amazon Studios I Am Not Your Negro Youtube James Baldwin: The Last Interview: and other Conversations (The Last Interview Series) Interview with James Baldwin on Sexuality – Richard...

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The Poetic Address to the Nation (Encore)
Nov01

The Poetic Address to the Nation (Encore)

November 8 marks one year since Donald Trump won the US presidency. One year later, Gallup puts the President’s approval rating at 33%, an all-time low. We at Making Contact reflect on his solid win in the electoral college, his resounding loss of the popular vote, and the year that is drawing to a close. The Poetic Address to the Nation was an event that brought together poets to speak out and against the current administration. The event featured poets Cam Awkward, Guillermo Gomez Peña, Michelle ‘Mush’ Lee, Chinaka Hodge, and many others to share pieces from immigration, to trans violence, to activism. Making Contact is broadcasting an abridged version of the event produced by the Yerba Buena Center for the Arts and the U.S. Department of Arts and Culture. The 2017 Poetic Address to the Nation was organized by Yerba Buena Center for the Arts, in partnership with U.S. Department of Art and Culture. The USDAC is not a government agency–it’s a people-powered department—a grassroots action network inciting creativity and social imagination to shape a culture of empathy, equity, and belonging. The USDAC is also a member of the New Economy Coalition. Like this program? Please show us the love. Click here and support our non-profit journalism. Thanks! Featuring: Michelle ‘Mush’ Lee Hadeel Ramadan Guillermo Gomez Peña Cam Awkard Tassiana Willis Chinaka Hodge Young, Gifted & Black Credits: Host: R.J. Lozada Producers: Anita Johnson, Marie Choi, Monica Lopez, R.J. Lozada Executive Director: Lisa Rudman Audience Engagement Director/Web Editor: Sabine Blaizin Development Associate: Vera Tykulsker Music: Show opener: ‘Prose,’ by Glass Boy Show credits: ‘Blaster 47’ by Glass Boy More Information: Yerba Buena Center for the Arts U.S. Department of Arts and Culture The 2017 Poetic Address to the Nation #PSOTU2017 Climbing PoeTree – We Survived Art is Our Weapon: A Conversation With Climbing Poetree Climbing Poetree: Intrinsic The Power of Poetry...

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Jeff Chang on Revolutions in Seeing and Being
Oct11

Jeff Chang on Revolutions in Seeing and Being

“From almost every kind of responsibility and tie from engagement and from faith. So the artist–our task is to move ourselves and the rest of us in the opposite direction. Toward more engagement, towards stronger ethics, toward a social that’s open and inclusive to all toward seeing each other in full, to challenge us to recognize the debts, and yes, the reparations that we owe to each other.” – Jeff Chang Jeff Chang offers ideas to reinforce the importance of art and artists in today’s sociopolitical climate. Chang presented a keynote address for the Art and Race conference, that took place at Oakland Impact Hub earlier this year. Special thanks to Ashara Ekundayo, Christina Orticke, and tech team Zochi and Shah. Like this program? Please show us the love. Click here and support our non-profit journalism. Thanks! TRANSCRIPT –see below Featuring: Jeff Chang, Historian, Author of We Gon’ Be Alright: Notes on Race and Resegregation, Who We Be: The Colorization of America, and other books. Credits: Host: R.J. Lozada Producers: Anita Johnson, Marie Choi, Monica Lopez, R.J. Lozada Executive Director: Lisa Rudman Audience Engagement Director/Web Editor: Sabine Blaizin Development Associate: Vera Tykulsker More Information: Art and Race Conference: A Convergence of Provocation, Strategy, and Beauty Umber Magazine Omi Gallery Oakland Impact Hub Jeff Chang TRANSCRIPT: NARR: I’m R.J. Lozada and this is Making Contact… J. CHANG: We believe in art because we believe in life in all its variations and all of its beauty. We’re here because we also believe that the ugliness, the violence of inhumanity can be transformed. We’re here today because we believe that art and culture change things, that cultural change might even precede, might even make political change To believe in the arts is sometimes… having a kind of a faith, not necessarily a religious faith but very near to it… right…? That sometimes things are just going to be alright. Can’t tell you why… right? Can’t tell you how–it’s going to be all right though ..right? And yet we also know that throughout history, arts and culture have led to revolutions. And so we talk about the ways in which the arts and culture brought about revolutions of seeing and being. We present historian, Jeff Chang and his keynote at the Art and Race Conference at Impact Hub in Oakland that took place earlier this summer… Chang talks about the importance, and value, of creating art that provokes viewers from stasis… …art that speaks to and responds to struggle… to encourage conversations and build empathy, and more importantly, drive communities into action…to create new realities that are inclusive, equitable, and just…. …and now, Jeff Chang....

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Mrs. Hamer Echoes
Oct04

Mrs. Hamer Echoes

Civil rights leader Fannie Lou Hamer, spoke words that are all too relevant today. Mrs. Hamer would have turned 100 years old on October 6th 2017. Today on Making Contact, you’ll hear archival recordings, and excerpts from a powerful new film featuring Fannie Lou Hamer’s contemporaries– themselves now elders. You’ll hear about the context of her life, and the lives of other sharecroppers in Mississippi from a seldom heard film produced for the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee or SNCC. Special thanks for music to our listener, Lisa E. Williams, for lending us her tune “Julia”.  TRANSCRIPT available below –thanks to volunteers! Like this program? Please show us the love. Click here and support our non-profit journalism. Thanks! Featuring: Amzie Moore, SNCC, The Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee Dorie Ladner and Heather Booth, Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee Reverend Leslie McLemore, Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party Sharecroppers Fannie Lou Hamer Credits: Host: Anita Johnson Editing Assistant: Emily Harris Producers: Anita Johnson, Marie Choi, Monica Lopez, R.J. Lozada Executive Director: Lisa Rudman Audience Engagement Director/Web Editor: Sabine Blaizin Development Associate: Vera Tykulsker   Robin Hamilton’s This Little Light of Mine: the Legacy of Fannie Lou Hamer, soon-to-be released film Paul Richards at Estuary Press and the film Dream Deferred and produced by his late father Harvey Richards Claude Marks and Freedom Archives Colin Edwards and his widow Mary Edwards Shawn Dellis at Pacifica Archives Keith McMillan at Jackson State University, Fannie Lou Hamer Institute at COFO Dr. Guha Shankar at the Library of Congress Folklife Center, discussion with Robin Hamilton about her new film Dr. Sade Turnipseed and her Cotton Pickers of America Monument and Interpretive Center Music: Original Music  – Lisa E. Williams Music from Robin Hamilton’s film –  Mathew Prins, Josh Kramer, Fred Capo, Cinquequarti, ArtTune Tech, Pond 5 Music Fannie Lou Hamer – Sweet Honey in the Rock Prelude 1  – Chris Zabriskie Caravan – Blue Dot Session Ergo Phizmiz Cory Gray More Information: Fannie Lou Hamer and see all the sources above TRANSCRIPT Collage of bites with simple ambient music under. I think a man should be impeached when they are not really dealing with the people My soul is tired white folks, of what you have done to us If this society of yours is a Great Society, God knows I would hate to live in a bad one.” applause… We are SICK and TIRED OF BEING SICK AND TIRED. And we are tired of people saying that we’re satisfied because we are everything but satisfied.   I’ve heard lots about “with the people for the people by the people but it’s by a Handful with a handful For an Handful! A House divided cannot stand, a nation divided cannot...

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