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Jeff Chang on Revolutions in Seeing and Being
Oct11

Jeff Chang on Revolutions in Seeing and Being

“From almost every kind of responsibility and tie from engagement and from faith. So the artist–our task is to move ourselves and the rest of us in the opposite direction. Toward more engagement, towards stronger ethics, toward a social that’s open and inclusive to all toward seeing each other in full, to challenge us to recognize the debts, and yes, the reparations that we owe to each other.” – Jeff Chang Jeff Chang offers ideas to reinforce the importance of art and artists in today’s sociopolitical climate. Chang presented a keynote address for the Art and Race conference, that took place at Oakland Impact Hub earlier this year. Special thanks to Ashara Ekundayo, Christina Orticke, and tech team Zochi and Shah. Like this program? Please show us the love. Click here and support our non-profit journalism. Thanks! TRANSCRIPT –see below Featuring: Jeff Chang, Historian, Author of We Gon’ Be Alright: Notes on Race and Resegregation, Who We Be: The Colorization of America, and other books. Credits: Host: R.J. Lozada Producers: Anita Johnson, Marie Choi, Monica Lopez, R.J. Lozada Executive Director: Lisa Rudman Audience Engagement Director/Web Editor: Sabine Blaizin Development Associate: Vera Tykulsker More Information: Art and Race Conference: A Convergence of Provocation, Strategy, and Beauty Umber Magazine Omi Gallery Oakland Impact Hub Jeff Chang TRANSCRIPT: NARR: I’m R.J. Lozada and this is Making Contact… J. CHANG: We believe in art because we believe in life in all its variations and all of its beauty. We’re here because we also believe that the ugliness, the violence of inhumanity can be transformed. We’re here today because we believe that art and culture change things, that cultural change might even precede, might even make political change To believe in the arts is sometimes… having a kind of a faith, not necessarily a religious faith but very near to it… right…? That sometimes things are just going to be alright. Can’t tell you why… right? Can’t tell you how–it’s going to be all right though ..right? And yet we also know that throughout history, arts and culture have led to revolutions. And so we talk about the ways in which the arts and culture brought about revolutions of seeing and being. We present historian, Jeff Chang and his keynote at the Art and Race Conference at Impact Hub in Oakland that took place earlier this summer… Chang talks about the importance, and value, of creating art that provokes viewers from stasis… …art that speaks to and responds to struggle… to encourage conversations and build empathy, and more importantly, drive communities into action…to create new realities that are inclusive, equitable, and just…. …and now, Jeff Chang....

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Mrs. Hamer Echoes
Oct04

Mrs. Hamer Echoes

Civil rights leader Fannie Lou Hamer, spoke words that are all too relevant today. Mrs. Hamer would have turned 100 years old on October 6th 2017. Today on Making Contact, you’ll hear archival recordings, and excerpts from a powerful new film featuring Fannie Lou Hamer’s contemporaries– themselves now elders. You’ll hear about the context of her life, and the lives of other sharecroppers in Mississippi from a seldom heard film produced for the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee or SNCC. Special thanks for music to our listener, Lisa E. Williams, for lending us her tune “Julia”.  TRANSCRIPT available below –thanks to volunteers! Like this program? Please show us the love. Click here and support our non-profit journalism. Thanks! Featuring: Amzie Moore, SNCC, The Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee Dorie Ladner and Heather Booth, Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee Reverend Leslie McLemore, Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party Sharecroppers Fannie Lou Hamer Credits: Host: Anita Johnson Editing Assistant: Emily Harris Producers: Anita Johnson, Marie Choi, Monica Lopez, R.J. Lozada Executive Director: Lisa Rudman Audience Engagement Director/Web Editor: Sabine Blaizin Development Associate: Vera Tykulsker   Robin Hamilton’s This Little Light of Mine: the Legacy of Fannie Lou Hamer, soon-to-be released film Paul Richards at Estuary Press and the film Dream Deferred and produced by his late father Harvey Richards Claude Marks and Freedom Archives Colin Edwards and his widow Mary Edwards Shawn Dellis at Pacifica Archives Keith McMillan at Jackson State University, Fannie Lou Hamer Institute at COFO Dr. Guha Shankar at the Library of Congress Folklife Center, discussion with Robin Hamilton about her new film Dr. Sade Turnipseed and her Cotton Pickers of America Monument and Interpretive Center Music: Original Music  – Lisa E. Williams Music from Robin Hamilton’s film –  Mathew Prins, Josh Kramer, Fred Capo, Cinquequarti, ArtTune Tech, Pond 5 Music Fannie Lou Hamer – Sweet Honey in the Rock Prelude 1  – Chris Zabriskie Caravan – Blue Dot Session Ergo Phizmiz Cory Gray More Information: Fannie Lou Hamer and see all the sources above TRANSCRIPT Collage of bites with simple ambient music under. I think a man should be impeached when they are not really dealing with the people My soul is tired white folks, of what you have done to us If this society of yours is a Great Society, God knows I would hate to live in a bad one.” applause… We are SICK and TIRED OF BEING SICK AND TIRED. And we are tired of people saying that we’re satisfied because we are everything but satisfied.   I’ve heard lots about “with the people for the people by the people but it’s by a Handful with a handful For an Handful! A House divided cannot stand, a nation divided cannot...

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The Ghosts of the Gwangju Uprising
Sep13

The Ghosts of the Gwangju Uprising

  On May 18, 1980, the people of Gwangju, South Korea came together for reunification and an end to an era of martial law imposed by U.S.-backed military dictators. Over the course of ten days, they staged mass protests, battled riot police and soldiers, and were met with brutal repression. Together, they successfully drove the military out Gwangju and governed the city together. Their actions changed the course of Korean history. On Part 1 of this episode of Making Contact, we hear from survivors of the Gwangju Uprising about how they took on the tasks of history and the lessons they carry. Special thanks to Jung Dong Suk of Gwangju SPARK, Io Sunwoo, Esther Kang, and Hella Organized Bay Area Koreans. Image Credit: Hong Sung-Dam Like this program? Please show us the love. Click here and support our non-profit journalism. Thanks! Featuring: Lee Yoon Jung, President of the May Women’s Association Ahn Sung Rye, Nurse Supervisor at Gwangju Gidok Hospital during the Gwangju Uprising Credits: Host: Marie Choi Producers: Anita Johnson, Marie Choi, Monica Lopez, R.J. Lozada Executive Director: Lisa Rudman Audience Engagement Director/Web Editor: Sabine Blaizin Development Associate: Vera Tykulsker Archival Tape: U.S. Department of Defense Combat Bulletin 101, United Newsreels Japan Surrenders U.S. Soldiers Voiceovers: R.J. Lozada, Josh Klinkenberger and Tavis Kelley Yoon Jung Lee Voiceover: Deann Borshay Liem Ahn Sung Rye Voiceover: Miriam Ching Louie Music: +rain – Jio Im 우리의 소원은 통일 (Our Wish is Reunification) for Piano based on B.W. Ahn – Young Jo Lee What Were We Holding Onto – Jio Im March of the Beloved for News Tapa – Yojo and Ruben July – Jio Im 1983 Song for News Tapa – Sulpa More Information: HOBAK Gwangju Diary: Beyond Death, Beyond the Darkness of Age by Lee Jae Eui  March of The Beloved, Zoom In Korea May 18 Gwangju Peoples Uprising, Korean Resource Center of Los Angeles  A Taxi Driver  Stirrings of Resistance The Legacy of the Gwangju Uprising May 18 Memorial Foundation ...

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Staying Rooted: Community Focused Economic Models, Cooperative Housing, and the New Economy Coalition
Aug30

Staying Rooted: Community Focused Economic Models, Cooperative Housing, and the New Economy Coalition

Collective housing, cultural co-ops, land trusts, community banks are community-rooted enterprises that empower those that have been excluded from traditional economic institutions. Solidarity economy models exercised throughout the country are becoming viable solutions towards sustainable and economically just living. Today we’re visiting community-rooted enterprises where people are rethinking power and participation in their lives. Collective housing and cultural co-ops, land trusts and community banks are providing fundamental shifts in our workplaces, living spaces, and economic understanding of local communities. This program was produced with support from the New Economies Reporting Project, funded with a grant from the Park Foundation. Like this program? Please show us the love. Click here and support our non-profit journalism. Thanks! Featuring: Eri Oura – Cycles of Change, The Bikery Devi Peacock – Peacock Rebellion, Liberating Ourselves Locally Harper Bishop – Open Buffalo Julia Ho – Solidarity Economy St. Louis Iya Ifalola Omobola – Cooperation Jackson Amara Enyia – Public Policy Expert Credits: Host: R.J. Lozada Producers: Anita Johnson, Marie Choi, Monica Lopez, R.J. Lozada Executive Director: Lisa Rudman Audience Engagement Director/Web Editor: Sabine Blaizin Development Associate: Vera Tykulsker Recordist: Rachel Dickson More Information: New Economy Coalition – https://neweconomy.net/ Open Buffalo – https://openbuffalo.org/ Solidarity Economy St. Louis – https://www.solidaritystl.org/ Cooperation Jackson – http://www.cooperationjackson.org/ Amara Enyia Website – https://www.facebook.com/amaraforchicago/ Liberate 23rd Ave – https://www.youcaring.com/liberate Liberating Ourselves Locally (LOL) – https://oaklandmakerspace.wordpress.com/ Sustaining Ourselves Locally (Oakland SOL) – http://oaklandsol.weebly.com/ Cycles of Change/The Bikery – http://www.cyclesofchange.org/ ; http://thebikery.weebly.com/ Solidarity Economy: Key Concepts and Issues African American Coop History The Emerging Solidarity Economy in the United States How We Live: Journey Towards A Just Transition The New Economy (the Upstream...

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Walk the Talk: Stories of Indigenous-led Resistance to Oil and Waste
Jul25

Walk the Talk: Stories of Indigenous-led Resistance to Oil and Waste

On this edition of Making Contact, we’ll meet people challenging polluters in their own backyard. Not to push hazardous industries into another neighborhood. Instead they’re developing visionary solutions for a better life for all and for the future of the planet. From urban to rural communities, we’ll learn about indigenous-led efforts to protect public health and the environment for future generations. We’ll meet Community Storytelling Fellow, environmental and indigenous leader Isabella Zizi. In this piece, Zizi talks about how the 2012 Chevron refinery fire in Richmond, California sparked her involvement in indigenous-led environmental movements. Zizi walks us from one refinery town to the next, showing us what it’s like living next door to an oil refinery and how these towns have come together to protect the sacred systems of the planet. Then we head to Maine where we meet communities fighting the expansion of a landfill. The Penobscot Nation lives on the river that shares their name. Just upstream from their island reservation is Juniper Ridge, Maine’s largest landfill and the only one that’s state-owned. Casella, the corporation operating the landfill wants to double its size. Penobscots who rely on river fish as a culturally important food source are worried about the river being polluted by the growing dump. Along with their neighbors, they’ve been fighting to halt the expansion. In the process, they’ve exposed backroom dealings that have paved the way for the landfill’s continued growth. Special Thanks to The Christensen Fund for supporting our Indigenous Native-American storytelling fellowships. Like this program? Please show us the love. Click here and support our non-profit journalism. Thanks! Featuring: Isabella Zizi, Making Contact Community Storytelling Fellow,  Idle No More SF Bay Organizer, Youth Director Earth Guardians Bay Area Alison Ehara Brown, Indigenous Women of the Americas Defending Mother Earth Treaty Signer, Idle No More SF Bay Founder Daniel Adel, California Student Sustainability Coalition Online Communications Coordinator Rich Lohman, Healing Walk Volunteer Patricia St. Onge, Idle No More SF Bay Nafsi Ya Jamii Donovin Keomanee, Healing Walk Monitor/Volunteer Kathy Paul, Penobscot Tribal Member and Elder, Water Protector John Banks, Director of the Penobscot Nation’s Natural Resource Department Ed Spencer, Low Impact Logger, Community Activist Paul Schroeder, Retired Librarian, Community Activist Cheryl Spencer, Environmental Researcher, Community Activist Bob Duchesne, Maine State Representative, Environment & Natural Resources Committee Member Ryan Parker,  Environmental Policy Outreach Coordinator, Natural Resources Council of Maine Andy Jones, Community Organizer, Maine Toxics Action Center Credits: Host: Laura Flynn Contributing Producers: Laura Flynn, Isabella Zizi, Meaghan LaSala, and Lisa Bartfai Producers: Anita Johnson, Marie Choi, Monica Lopez, R.J. Lozada Executive Director: Lisa Rudman Audience Engagement Director/Web Editor: Sabine Blaizin Development Associate: Vera Tykulsker Music:...

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The Aftermath of Ghost Ship and the San Pablo Fires
Jul19

The Aftermath of Ghost Ship and the San Pablo Fires

On this edition of Making Contact, we’ll explore the aftermath of the Ghost Ship fire and the battle to preserve live/work spaces, and then we look at the San Pablo fire in Oakland California that displaced at least a hundred residents…many of whom are now living on the streets in tent encampments. Special Thanks to KALW and Jeremy Dalmas. Like this program? Please show us the love. Click here and support our non-profit journalism. Thanks! Featuring: Carmen Brito Jonah Strauss Traymaine “Trey” Baker Alex Perry Nicole Sawaya Craig Baldwin Sarah Lockheart Van Dell Credits: Host: Anita Johnson Freelance Producer: Jeremy Dalmas Producers: Anita Johnson, Marie Choi, Monica Lopez, R.J. Lozada, Andrew Stelzer Executive Director: Lisa Rudman Audience Engagement Director/Web Editor: Sabine Blaizin Development Associate: Vera Tykulsker   Music: Show opener: The Generalist Praxis by Generalist – OverFlow Brine  Show close: Blue Dot Sessions – Grand Caravan  The Electronic Music used throughout the show was from victims of the fire or people scheduled to play that night.  More Information: Documentary: 3 Months After Ghost Ship Fire San Pablo Avenue Fire...

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