Please support our programs

radio stories and voices to take action

World Trade Watch Radio


World Trade Watch Radio

November 29 – December 3, 1999

1-minute Promo (mp3)
30-minute Preview of Show (mp3)

During the World Trade Organization’s five day summit in Seattle, Washington, the National Radio Project collaborated with the Institute for Public Accuracy and Corporate Watch to broadcast live, one-hour daily programs.

The collaborative project is called World Trade Watch and is hosted by syndicated columnist Norman Solomon and veteran radio journalist Julie Light.

~~~

November 29, 1999:
World Trade Watch: Day One

On this program, we explore some of the key issues expected to be discussed at the World Trade Organization ministerial in Seattle: labor rights and environmental standards. We also take a look at corporate involvement in WTO negotiations. And, we feature a debate between a pro-free trade business leader and a critic of free trade policies.

~~~

November 30, 1999:
World Trade Watch: Day Two

On this program, we assess the significance of the massive protests taking place in Seattle. We also take a look at the impact of WTO policies on farmers in the United States and abroad. And, we explore key differences among trade delegates from developing countries and those of industrialized nations.

Correspondent Pratap Chatterjee reports from inside the WTO ministerial on the failed multi-agency law enforcement efforts to keep the WTO talks on track.

A member of the U.S. congressional delegation to the WTO summit shares an insider view of WTO negotiations.

We also talk with workers from South Africa, Mexico and the United States about work conditions and the impact of free trade policies on their jobs.

~~~

December 1, 1999
World Trade Watch: Day Three

On this program, we report on the heavy police crackdown against anti-WTO demonstrators in the streets of Seattle.

Correspondent Pratap Chatterjee reports from inside the WTO ministerial on the failed multi-agency law enforcement efforts to keep the WTO talks on track.

A member of the U.S. congressional delegation to the WTO summit shares an insider view of WTO negotiations.

We also talk with workers from South Africa, Mexico and the United States about work conditions and the impact of free trade policies on their jobs.

~~~

December 2, 1999
World Trade Watch: Day Four

On this program, we get an on-the-ground perspective on the protests in Seattle from the viewpoint of a demonstration organizer.

We also discuss the environmental impacts of multinational oil companies in Latin America and Nigeria and how the WTO could affect those impacts by ruling against environmental standards in member countries.

We get reaction to President Clinton’s address to the WTO from two policy analysts.

Correspondent Pratap Chatterjee reports on Cargill, one of the largest agricultural corporations in the world. He also explores how multinational agribusiness is affecting the WTO’s biotechnology proposals.

And, we take a look at WTO plans to eliminate or lower tariffs on forest products and the environmental consequences.

~~~

December 3, 1999
World Trade Watch: Day Five

On the last day of the WTO ministerial many key issues among trade ministers appear to be unresolved. We discuss some of the sticking points and how trade representatives from the United States and other industrialized nations are trying to exert influence over less developed countries within the World Trade Organization.

Also, our guests reflect on the past week’s events, and what it all means for activism and organizing around economic and environmental justice.

Correspondent Pratap Chatterjee reports on a Clinton administration decision to not crack down on poor countries that make generic versions of HIV/AIDS drugs, making these life saving medicines more affordable.

Correspondent Monica Lopez reports on the impacts of trade on women, often hit hardest by the effects of globalization.

And, we discuss the fifteenth anniversary of the Bhopal gas disaster in India which left nearly 8000 workers and nearby residents dead, one of the worst industrial accidents in history.

To receive a free WTO Resource and Information packet, call (800) 529-5736.

More WTO information:

Author: Sabine Blaizin

Share This Post On