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Brothers at Odds: The U.S. Army vs. Lt. Ehren Watada

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Lieutenant Watadas speech to the Veterans for Peace National Convention, Seattle, August 12, 2006.  Source: Jeff Paterson - thankyoult.org

Lieutenant Watada's speech to the Veterans for Peace National Convention, Seattle, August 12, 2006. Source: Jeff Paterson - thankyoult.org

The Fourth Anniversary of the Iraq War is upon us, and more than eight thousand members of the U.S. military are officially unaccounted for. Many other soldiers are publicly opposing the war and refusing to deploy. Lieutenant Ehren Watada is among them. He’s the first Army officer to be tried for refusing to deploy to Iraq.

On this edition, Aaron Glantz sheds light on the events and issues surrounding the recent court martial of Lt. Watada. We’ll hear from those supporting him, from analysts following the case and from the accused Army officer himself.

Featuring:

Anne Wright, Retired Army Colonel and Ambassador; Lieutenant Ehren Watada, first Army officer to be tried for refusing to deploy to Iraq; Benjamin Ferencz, one of the chief prosecutors at Nuremberg; Eric Seitz, Lt. Watada’s attorney; Geoff Millard, Iraq war veteran who covered the trial for truthout.org; Jeff Patterson, Courage to Resist member and former Marine who refused to fight in the first Gulf War; Joe Piek, Fort Lewis spokesperson; Carolyn Ho, Lieutenant Watada’s mother; Staff Sergeant Don Hanks, served fifteen years in Army; Michael Wong, social worker, Veterans for Peace member; Helga Aguayo, wife of Augustin Aguayo, army medic facing seven years in prison for going AWOL (absent without leave).

Senior Producer/Host: Tena Rubio
Contributing Producer: Aaron Glantz
Mixing Engineer: Phillip Babich
Intern: Alexis McCrimmon

For more information:

Courage to Resist

Iraq Veterans Against the War

Family and Friends of Lt. Ehren Watada

Fort Lewis Public Affairs Office

Augustine Aguayo Defense Committee

Agustín Aguayo was convicted of desertion and missing movement March 6, 2007 in a U.S. military court in Germany. Aguayo was sentenced to eight months in the brig for following his conscience and refusing to participate in war.

Author: Kwan

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