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Walk the Talk: Stories of Indigenous-led Resistance to Oil and Waste
Jul25

Walk the Talk: Stories of Indigenous-led Resistance to Oil and Waste

On this edition of Making Contact, we’ll meet people challenging polluters in their own backyard. Not to push hazardous industries into another neighborhood. Instead they’re developing visionary solutions for a better life for all and for the future of the planet. From urban to rural communities, we’ll learn about indigenous-led efforts to protect public health and the environment for future generations. We’ll meet Community Storytelling Fellow, environmental and indigenous leader Isabella Zizi. In this piece, Zizi talks about how the 2012 Chevron refinery fire in Richmond, California sparked her involvement in indigenous-led environmental movements. Zizi walks us from one refinery town to the next, showing us what it’s like living next door to an oil refinery and how these towns have come together to protect the sacred systems of the planet. Then we head to Maine where we meet communities fighting the expansion of a landfill. The Penobscot Nation lives on the river that shares their name. Just upstream from their island reservation is Juniper Ridge, Maine’s largest landfill and the only one that’s state-owned. Casella, the corporation operating the landfill wants to double its size. Penobscots who rely on river fish as a culturally important food source are worried about the river being polluted by the growing dump. Along with their neighbors, they’ve been fighting to halt the expansion. In the process, they’ve exposed backroom dealings that have paved the way for the landfill’s continued growth. Special Thanks to The Christensen Fund for supporting our Indigenous Native-American storytelling fellowships. Like this program? Please show us the love. Click here and support our non-profit journalism. Thanks! Featuring: Isabella Zizi, Making Contact Community Storytelling Fellow,  Idle No More SF Bay Organizer, Youth Director Earth Guardians Bay Area Alison Ehara Brown, Indigenous Women of the Americas Defending Mother Earth Treaty Signer, Idle No More SF Bay Founder Daniel Adel, California Student Sustainability Coalition Online Communications Coordinator Rich Lohman, Healing Walk Volunteer Patricia St. Onge, Idle No More SF Bay Nafsi Ya Jamii Donovin Keomanee, Healing Walk Monitor/Volunteer Kathy Paul, Penobscot Tribal Member and Elder, Water Protector John Banks, Director of the Penobscot Nation’s Natural Resource Department Ed Spencer, Low Impact Logger, Community Activist Paul Schroeder, Retired Librarian, Community Activist Cheryl Spencer, Environmental Researcher, Community Activist Bob Duchesne, Maine State Representative, Environment & Natural Resources Committee Member Ryan Parker,  Environmental Policy Outreach Coordinator, Natural Resources Council of Maine Andy Jones, Community Organizer, Maine Toxics Action Center Credits: Host: Laura Flynn Contributing Producers: Laura Flynn, Isabella Zizi, Meaghan LaSala, and Lisa Bartfai Producers: Anita Johnson, Marie Choi, Monica Lopez, R.J. Lozada Executive Director: Lisa Rudman Audience Engagement Director/Web Editor: Sabine Blaizin Development Associate: Vera Tykulsker Music:...

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Isabella Zizi: Indigenous Environmental Justice
Jul06

Isabella Zizi: Indigenous Environmental Justice

Earlier this year, I received multiple emails from some colleagues to apply for Making Contact’s Spring Community Storytelling Fellowship. I was very intrigued by the title of the fellowship: Indigenous Solutions and Climate Crisis. I finally said to myself “Let’s take a look at what this is all about.” At first I was hesitant to apply because I didn’t consider myself a storyteller. I felt that I didn’t have the background skills or wasn’t educated about radio and audio recordings. When I continued to read the overview, the application read “Applicants are Indigenous activists in Bay Area Indigenous-led movements that address the climate crisis and lead around a vision of respect for the earth and its peoples.” I thought, that’s me! Within one week after applying, I received an email to participate in the first round of interviews. Applicants had to pitch a story. Since I live in Richmond, CA I wanted to bring up the August 6th 2012 Chevron refinery explosion and share a personal story about my experience that day. I also wanted to incorporate my inspiration in joining Idle No More SF Bay early 2014 to help organize Indigenous led refinery healing walks. Meanwhile, as I waited to hear about my application I was in the final 2 weeks of helping to plan the April 2017 Refinery Healing walk. It was the first of our set of four this summer, and this year is the last of the four years Idle No More SF Bay has committed to organizing them.   On the afternoon before the April walk –from Pittsburg refineries (Koch Cardon) to Martinez refineries (Tesoro and Shell) and our neighborhoods between them — I received a phone call from Making Contact’s Executive Director Lisa Rudman. She applauded my work and announced that I was selected to be the 2017 Native-American/Indigenous fellow for the Community Storytelling Fellowship. I was absolutely in shock and so excited to get this opportunity.   Over the next weeks, Laura Flynn (one of Making Contact’s producers) and I started right away on the first draft of my story outline. I wanted to create a transitional story that captured the hardship of living in a refinery town and highlight the positive shift of what the refinery healing walks has done for community members like myself  in the East Bay. At first, the process of being the fellow was a bit intimidating and overwhelming. I had to work around my work schedule, refinery healing walk organizing meetings, and monthly new moon ceremonies that I help coordinate with other women who signed on to the Indigenous Women of the Americas Defending Mother Earth treaty....

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Caring Relationships: Negotiating Meaning and Maintaining Dignity ENCORE
Jan31

Caring Relationships: Negotiating Meaning and Maintaining Dignity ENCORE

In this disturbing era of Trump, we revisit our encore show on disability rights. During his campaign in November 2016, Trump mocked NY Times reporter Serge Kovaleski, who had chronic joint disease that limits his arm movements. On this edition of Making Contact, we’ll explore the dynamic and complex relationship of care receiving, giving, and disability rights. The vast majority of care recipients are exclusively receiving unpaid care from a family member, friend, or neighbor. The rest receive a combination of family care and paid assistance, or exclusively paid formal care. Whether you’re a paid home care provider, or rely on personal assistance to meet your daily needs, or a family member caring for a loved one, the nature of the working relationship depends on mutual respect and dignity. This show features a special segment by Making Contact Storytelling Fellow Alice Wong. Find out more about the fellowship here. Like this program? Please show us the love. Click here and support our non-profit journalism. Thanks! Featuring: Camille Christian, home care provider and SEIU member Brenda Jackson, home care provider and SEIU member Patty Berne, co-founder and director, Sins Invalid Kenzi Robi, president, San Francisco IHSS (In Home Supportive Services) Public Authority Governing Body Jessica Lehman, executive director, San Francisco Senior and Disability Action Rachel Stewart,  is a queer disabled woman who is passionate about disability and employment issues Alana Theriault, disability benefits counselor in Berkeley, California Ingrid Tischer, director of development, Disability Rights Education & Defense Fund (DREDF) Alta Mae Stevens, in-home caregiver Alice Wong, disabled journalist and Making Contact’s 6th Community Storytelling Fellow Credits: Host: Laura Flynn Producers: Laura Flynn, Monica Lopez, Jasmin Lopez Contributing Producers: Alice Wong, Stephanie Guyer-Stevens Executive Director: Lisa Rudman Audience Engagement Director/Web Editor: Sabine Blaizin Development Associate: Vera Tykulsker Music: Dexter Britain: The Time To Run (Finale)    Gillicuddy: Adventure, Darling Steve Combs: March Jason Shaw: Running Waters Jared C. Balogh: BRICK BY BRICK DAY BY DAY Jared C. Balogh: INCREMENTS TOWARDS SERENITY  Nheap: Crossings Cherly KaCherly: The Hungry Garden Trio Metrik: Vogelperspektive Kevin MacLeod: Faster Does It More Information: UCSF: UCSF Study Projects Need for 2.5M More Long-Term Care Workers by 2030 SEIU: Longterm Care Workers Disability Rights Education & Defense Fund Disability Visibility Project Hand in Hand: The Domestic Employers Network National Disability Leadership Alliance Senior and Disability Action Sins Invalid San Francisco In Home Supportive Services Public Authority Family Caregiver...

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Native Power: Language, Land, and Water NoDAPL
Nov22

Native Power: Language, Land, and Water NoDAPL

Special thanks to the Christensen Fund for supporting Making Contact’s indigenous storytelling fellows. The actions at Standing Rock against the Dakota Access Pipeline in North Dakota continue. On the night of November 20, 2016, militarized police forces used tear gas, water cannons and rubber bullets, hospitalizing a dozen water protectors and injuring 160 others. While mainstream media coverage is sorely lacking and distorting, Native and independent journalists have been using social media to share anything from live Facebook video of on-the-ground actions to profiles within the Oceti Sakowin Camp. We share interviews from a grassroots media group called the Voices of Standing Rock. In the second half of the radio program you’ll hear Making Contact’s Community Storytelling Fellow, Vincent Medina, a Chochenyo Ohlone Native American who is a part of a young generation working to revitalize the Chochenyo language for future generations. Like this program? Please show us the love. Click here and support our non-profit journalism. Thanks! We are now seeking applications for our next Community Storytelling Fellowship, Indigenous Solutions and Climate Crisis. Deadline 3/22/17. Apply here. Please spread the word!  Featuring: Kevin Gillbert, Activist at Standing Rock Voices of Standing Rock, Grassroots Media Group   Audrey De La Rosa, Native American Water Protector S, Water Protector, First People, Toronto, Canada Vincent Medina, Chochenyo Ohlone, Language and Culture Activist, Making Contact Community Storytelling Fellow   Gabriel Medina, Chochenyo Ohlone   Dottie Galvan, Chochenyo Ohlone Elder Cathy G., Chochenyo Ohlone Elder Credits: Contributing Producers:  Voices of Standing Rock, Vincent Medina Host: R.J. Lozada Producers: Anita Johnson, Marie Choi, Monica Lopez, R.J. Lozada Executive Director: Lisa Rudman Web Editor: Kwan Booth Audience Engagement Director: Sabine Blaizin Development Associate: Vera Tykulsker Music: _ghost, “Lullaby” Kai Engel, “July” Lee Rosevere, “The Secret to Growing Up” Lee Rosevere, “Making a Change” Lee Rosevere, “Slow Lights” Like this program? Please show us the love. Click here and support our non-profit journalism. Thanks! More Information: Voices of Standing Rock (Facebook page) #NoDAPL...

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Immigrants & Elections Pt. 2: Barriers to the Ballot
Oct26

Immigrants & Elections Pt. 2: Barriers to the Ballot

Photo of Florita & Joseph Campbell at the Halo Halo Restaurant in Phoenix, AZ by contributing producer Valeria Fernández In the US, the right to vote is one of the country’s most cherished and hard-fought rights. But it doesn’t mean that everyone has equal access to the polls. In 2013 the Supreme Court struck down a key civil rights provision of the Voting Rights Act. This November will be the first presidential election in 50 years where voters will not have the full protection of the original law. In this second installment of Making Contact’s Immigrants and Elections series, we explore some of the barriers immigrants and other historically disenfranchised voters face in gaining access to the polls. Listen to our other episodes in our Immigrants and Elections series here. * Reporter Valeria Fernandez’s story was made possible with support from Making Contact and New America Media’s fellowship on voting rights. Part 2 Features: Nse Ufot, Executive Director of New Georgia Project Maria Rodriguez, Executive Director of Florida Immigrant Coalition Marco Ponce, active supporter of Proposition N Sandra Lee Fewer, San Francisco Unified School District Commissioner Matt Haney, President of the Board of Education of San Francisco Eric Mar, San Francisco County Supervisor Araceli Becerra, recently naturalized US citizen Leonardo Aromin, founder of the Filipino American Journal Samantha Pstross, Executive Director of Arizona Advocacy Network Vic Reid, civic engagement manager for Asian Pacific Community in Action.Host: Credits Host this week: Monica Lopez Contributing Producers: Valeria Fernández and Paulina Velasco Special thanks: Oyez Project for providing free online access to US Supreme Court audio recordings, Lyndon B. Johnson Presidential Library for access to their archives, and The Media Consortium for audio from their states’ briefing with Audio Recordist, Carson Riedel, The People’s Channel. Image Credits: “Florita & Joseph Campbell at the Halo Halo Restaurant in Phoenix, AZ” – Valeria Fernandez Music Credits: “Lifetrap”, Year of Glad; “Dents de fer”, FLIST!; “Motion”, Noah; “Surreal”, Ouri; “Future Life”, Ketsa YOUR SUPPORT MADE A DIFFERENCE:  Special thanks to all the individuals who contributed to our Beacon Crowdfunding campaign for our Immigrants and Elections miniseries. Thanks also to the Berwick-Degel Family foundation. More information The Oyez Project A Closer Look at Voter ID laws Across the US Jurisdictions Previously Covered by Section 5 The New Georgia Project Florida Immigrant Coalition Lyndon B. Johnson Presidential Library Feet in 2 Worlds As Trump Conjures the Voter Fraud Boogeyman, Voter Suppression is the Real Issue Asian American Voters Not Being Engaged in Ca.’s Ballot Initiative...

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Straddling Borders
Jun29

Straddling Borders

Existing in two worlds can complicate your identity and complete it–whether it’s understanding your medicine man grandfather, to deepening the concept of love through a different tongue, these storytellers takes us around the world from Colombia to Papua New Guinea, seeking definition and connections with presumably different cultures.  Featuring: Francis Rojas Jeremiah Barber William Guillermo Ortiz, Curandero / Medicine Man Florentina Mocanu-Schendel, Doctor of Theater and Performance Studies, Stanford University Warama Kurupel, Limol Village Leader Grace Maher Robai Reend Donai Kurupel Pingam Uziag Jenny Dobola Loni Garaiyi Sandra Dikai Merol Kwe Manaleato Kolea Credits Producers: R.J. Lozada, Marie Choi, Monica Lopez Host: R.J. Lozada Contributing Producers: Ingrid Rojas Contreras, Kate Lindsey Music: Jahzzar, Diary; Wagiba Geser, Walking Song Cover image: Kate Lindsey, sits with villagers at Limol, Paupa New Guinea. Photo provided by Kate Lindsey. Special thanks: This show features a segment from our Community Storytelling Fellowships. Thank You to our generous sponsors and individual donors. Thank you to Hindenberg, for donating use of their editing...

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