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I Am Not Your Negro
Nov08

I Am Not Your Negro

Master filmmaker Raoul Peck envisions the book James Baldwin never finished, Remember This House. The result is a radical, up-to-the-minute examination of race in America, using Baldwin’s original words and flood of rich archival material. I Am Not Your Negro is a journey into black history that connects the past of the Civil Rights movement to the present of #BlackLivesMatter. It is a film that questions black representation in Hollywood and beyond. And, ultimately, by confronting the deeper connections between the lives and assassination of Medgar Evers, Malcolm X and Martin Luther King Jr., Baldwin and Peck have produced a work that challenges the very definition of what America stands for. Special thanks to Master filmmaker Raoul Peck, Magnolia Pictures, and Amazon Studios. Like this program? Please show us the love. Click here and support our non-profit journalism. Thanks! Featuring: Film Participants include: James Baldwin, Harry Belafonte, Dick Cavett, Marlon Brando, Robert F. Kennedy, Martin Luther King Jr. Medgar Evers, Malcolm X and many more Credits: Host: Anita Johnson Producers: Anita Johnson, Marie Choi, Monica Lopez, R.J. Lozada, Andrew Stelzer Executive Director: Lisa Rudman Audience Engagement Director/Web Editor: Sabine Blaizin Development Associate: Vera Tykulsker More Information: I Am Not Your Negro Magnolia Pictures Amazon Studios I Am Not Your Negro Youtube James Baldwin: The Last Interview: and other Conversations (The Last Interview Series) Interview with James Baldwin on Sexuality – Richard...

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The Poetic Address to the Nation (Encore)
Nov01

The Poetic Address to the Nation (Encore)

November 8 marks one year since Donald Trump won the US presidency. One year later, Gallup puts the President’s approval rating at 33%, an all-time low. We at Making Contact reflect on his solid win in the electoral college, his resounding loss of the popular vote, and the year that is drawing to a close. The Poetic Address to the Nation was an event that brought together poets to speak out and against the current administration. The event featured poets Cam Awkward, Guillermo Gomez Peña, Michelle ‘Mush’ Lee, Chinaka Hodge, and many others to share pieces from immigration, to trans violence, to activism. Making Contact is broadcasting an abridged version of the event produced by the Yerba Buena Center for the Arts and the U.S. Department of Arts and Culture. The 2017 Poetic Address to the Nation was organized by Yerba Buena Center for the Arts, in partnership with U.S. Department of Art and Culture. The USDAC is not a government agency–it’s a people-powered department—a grassroots action network inciting creativity and social imagination to shape a culture of empathy, equity, and belonging. The USDAC is also a member of the New Economy Coalition. Like this program? Please show us the love. Click here and support our non-profit journalism. Thanks! Featuring: Michelle ‘Mush’ Lee Hadeel Ramadan Guillermo Gomez Peña Cam Awkard Tassiana Willis Chinaka Hodge Young, Gifted & Black Credits: Host: R.J. Lozada Producers: Anita Johnson, Marie Choi, Monica Lopez, R.J. Lozada Executive Director: Lisa Rudman Audience Engagement Director/Web Editor: Sabine Blaizin Development Associate: Vera Tykulsker Music: Show opener: ‘Prose,’ by Glass Boy Show credits: ‘Blaster 47’ by Glass Boy More Information: Yerba Buena Center for the Arts U.S. Department of Arts and Culture The 2017 Poetic Address to the Nation #PSOTU2017 Climbing PoeTree – We Survived Art is Our Weapon: A Conversation With Climbing Poetree Climbing Poetree: Intrinsic The Power of Poetry...

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Jeff Chang on Revolutions in Seeing and Being
Oct11

Jeff Chang on Revolutions in Seeing and Being

“From almost every kind of responsibility and tie from engagement and from faith. So the artist–our task is to move ourselves and the rest of us in the opposite direction. Toward more engagement, towards stronger ethics, toward a social that’s open and inclusive to all toward seeing each other in full, to challenge us to recognize the debts, and yes, the reparations that we owe to each other.” – Jeff Chang Jeff Chang offers ideas to reinforce the importance of art and artists in today’s sociopolitical climate. Chang presented a keynote address for the Art and Race conference, that took place at Oakland Impact Hub earlier this year. Special thanks to Ashara Ekundayo, Christina Orticke, and tech team Zochi and Shah. Like this program? Please show us the love. Click here and support our non-profit journalism. Thanks! TRANSCRIPT –see below Featuring: Jeff Chang, Historian, Author of We Gon’ Be Alright: Notes on Race and Resegregation, Who We Be: The Colorization of America, and other books. Credits: Host: R.J. Lozada Producers: Anita Johnson, Marie Choi, Monica Lopez, R.J. Lozada Executive Director: Lisa Rudman Audience Engagement Director/Web Editor: Sabine Blaizin Development Associate: Vera Tykulsker More Information: Art and Race Conference: A Convergence of Provocation, Strategy, and Beauty Umber Magazine Omi Gallery Oakland Impact Hub Jeff Chang TRANSCRIPT: NARR: I’m R.J. Lozada and this is Making Contact… J. CHANG: We believe in art because we believe in life in all its variations and all of its beauty. We’re here because we also believe that the ugliness, the violence of inhumanity can be transformed. We’re here today because we believe that art and culture change things, that cultural change might even precede, might even make political change To believe in the arts is sometimes… having a kind of a faith, not necessarily a religious faith but very near to it… right…? That sometimes things are just going to be alright. Can’t tell you why… right? Can’t tell you how–it’s going to be all right though ..right? And yet we also know that throughout history, arts and culture have led to revolutions. And so we talk about the ways in which the arts and culture brought about revolutions of seeing and being. We present historian, Jeff Chang and his keynote at the Art and Race Conference at Impact Hub in Oakland that took place earlier this summer… Chang talks about the importance, and value, of creating art that provokes viewers from stasis… …art that speaks to and responds to struggle… to encourage conversations and build empathy, and more importantly, drive communities into action…to create new realities that are inclusive, equitable, and just…. …and now, Jeff Chang....

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The Poetic Address to the Nation
May02

The Poetic Address to the Nation

The Poetic Address to the Nation was an event that brought together poets to speak out and against the current administration. The event featured poets Cam Awkward, Guillermo Gomez Peña, Michelle ‘Mush’ Lee, Chinaka Hodge, and many others to share pieces from immigration, to trans violence, to activism. Making Contact is broadcasting an abridged version of the event produced by the Yerba Buena Center for the Arts and the U.S. Department of Arts and Culture. The 2017 Poetic Address to the Nation was organized by Yerba Buena Center for the Arts, in partnership with U.S. Department of Art and Culture. The USDAC is not a government agency–it’s people-powered department—a grassroots action network inciting creativity and social imagination to shape a culture of empathy, equity, and belonging. The USDAC is also a member of the New Economy Coalition. Like this program? Please show us the love. Click here and support our non-profit journalism. Thanks! Featuring: Michelle ‘Mush’ Lee Hadeel Ramadan Guillermo Gomez Peña Cam Awkard Tassiana Willis Chinaka Hodge Young, Gifted & Black Credits: Host: R.J. Lozada Producers: Anita Johnson, Marie Choi, Monica Lopez, R.J. Lozada, Andrew Stelzer Executive Director: Lisa Rudman Audience Engagement Director/Web Editor: Sabine Blaizin Development Associate: Vera Tykulsker Music: Show opener: ‘Prose,’ by Glass Boy Show credits: ‘Blaster 47’ by Glass Boy More Information: Yerba Buena Center for the Arts U.S. Department of Arts and Culture The 2017 Poetic Address to the Nation #PSOTU2017 Climbing PoeTree – We Survived Art is Our Weapon: A Conversation With Climbing Poetree Climbing Poetree: Intrinsic The Power of Poetry...

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