Please support our programs

radio stories and voices to take action

Immigrants & Elections Pt. 2: Barriers to the Ballot
Oct26

Immigrants & Elections Pt. 2: Barriers to the Ballot

Photo of Florita & Joseph Campbell at the Halo Halo Restaurant in Phoenix, AZ by contributing producer Valeria Fernández In the US, the right to vote is one of the country’s most cherished and hard-fought rights. But it doesn’t mean that everyone has equal access to the polls. In 2013 the Supreme Court struck down a key civil rights provision of the Voting Rights Act. This November will be the first presidential election in 50 years where voters will not have the full protection of the original law. In this second installment of Making Contact’s Immigrants and Elections series, we explore some of the barriers immigrants and other historically disenfranchised voters face in gaining access to the polls. Listen to our other episodes in our Immigrants and Elections series here. * Reporter Valeria Fernandez’s story was made possible with support from Making Contact and New America Media’s fellowship on voting rights. Part 2 Features: Nse Ufot, Executive Director of New Georgia Project Maria Rodriguez, Executive Director of Florida Immigrant Coalition Marco Ponce, active supporter of Proposition N Sandra Lee Fewer, San Francisco Unified School District Commissioner Matt Haney, President of the Board of Education of San Francisco Eric Mar, San Francisco County Supervisor Araceli Becerra, recently naturalized US citizen Leonardo Aromin, founder of the Filipino American Journal Samantha Pstross, Executive Director of Arizona Advocacy Network Vic Reid, civic engagement manager for Asian Pacific Community in Action.Host: Credits Host this week: Monica Lopez Contributing Producers: Valeria Fernández and Paulina Velasco Special thanks: Oyez Project for providing free online access to US Supreme Court audio recordings, Lyndon B. Johnson Presidential Library for access to their archives, and The Media Consortium for audio from their states’ briefing with Audio Recordist, Carson Riedel, The People’s Channel. Image Credits: “Florita & Joseph Campbell at the Halo Halo Restaurant in Phoenix, AZ” – Valeria Fernandez Music Credits: “Lifetrap”, Year of Glad; “Dents de fer”, FLIST!; “Motion”, Noah; “Surreal”, Ouri; “Future Life”, Ketsa YOUR SUPPORT MADE A DIFFERENCE:  Special thanks to all the individuals who contributed to our Beacon Crowdfunding campaign for our Immigrants and Elections miniseries. Thanks also to the Berwick-Degel Family foundation. More information The Oyez Project A Closer Look at Voter ID laws Across the US Jurisdictions Previously Covered by Section 5 The New Georgia Project Florida Immigrant Coalition Lyndon B. Johnson Presidential Library Feet in 2 Worlds As Trump Conjures the Voter Fraud Boogeyman, Voter Suppression is the Real Issue Asian American Voters Not Being Engaged in Ca.’s Ballot Initiative...

Read More
Retaining Rondon: Creole Food in a Changing World
Sep28

Retaining Rondon: Creole Food in a Changing World

In a world that increasingly seems to strive for uniformity, afro-descendant Creole people on the eastern coast of Nicaragua seek to hold on to their unique culture through their food. Incoming palm plantations are fragmenting traditional Creole farmland and making it difficult for local coconut oil businesses. Overfishing and pesticides from the palm fields are reducing stocks of fish in the lagoons, making it more difficult to access traditional protein sources. In the towns and cities along the coast, an influx of foreign products is setting a new standard for how you should look, talk and eat. Rondon is one of the most celebrated traditional Creole dishes. Similar to a curry, it has a base of coconut milk in which you cook cassava, dasheen, breadfruit, baby corn and fried fish with fresh herbs and spices. It’s a dish with strong connections to Africa. For a people descended from freed blacks, escaped slaves and indigenous Americans, holding on to Rondon is holding on to heritage. Featuring:  Miss Connie Tinoko, Kenneth Fox, Edward Fox, John Watson, Miss Gay Sterling and her family Credits: Host: Marie Choi Contributing Producer: Maria Doerr Organizations and Support: Bluefields Sound System, Mikel Britton, Stanford Storytelling Project, Jake Warga, Claire Schoen, Bruce Braden Photo Credits: Maria Doerr Music Credit: Take Dis Five, Run-Down Orchestra Bluefield Sound System 2009, Zion-O, Run-Down Orchestra, Bluefield Sound System 2009, Reggae-instrumental 04, redmp3.cc (CC music), Reggae-instrumental 15, redmp3.cc (CC...

Read More
15 Years After 9/11, Still Searching for Monsters to Destroy
Sep07

15 Years After 9/11, Still Searching for Monsters to Destroy

September 11, 2001 ushered in an era marked by the unending War on Terror, dragnet government surveillance programs, and escalating attacks on people perceived to be Muslim. Just last month, Khalid Jabara, a 37-year old Lebanese American man was shot and killed on his front porch in Tulsa Oklahoma by a neighbor who had harassed his family for years, calling them ‘dirty Arabs’ and ‘Mooslems’. This is just one of the many reported attacks on people perceived as Muslims in the United States.  Last year, there were 174 incidents of anti-Muslim violence, and that’s only if you count the attacks that made headlines. This backlash is just tip of the iceberg.  Below the surface is a growing Islamophobia with deep roots in history and empire.  Where does the idea of the ‘Muslim enemy’ come from?  And how has it evolved into what we see today? Fifteen years after 9/11, Deepa Kumar, author of Islamophobia and the Politics of Empire, takes us back nearly 15 centuries to find out. Featuring:  Robynn Takayama, radio producer Nihal Mehta, founding member Ahimsa Tour Annie Koh, Asian Pacific Islander Coalition Against War Chris Durazo, Co-Founder of Nosei Network Maneesh Kenia, former KUSF DJ and member of the Dhamaal Collective Yuri Kochiyama Deepa Kumar, Professor of Media Studies and Middle Eastern Studies at Rutgers University, author of Islamophobia and Politics of Empire Credits   Host: Marie Choi Producers: Marie Choi, Monica Lopez, R.J. Lozada  “5-Song EP” Producer: Robynn Takayama, “Constructing the Muslim Enemy From the Crusades to 9/11” Recordist: Jeff Zavala with ZGraphix Productions Music: Night Owl by Broke for Free, Summer Spliffs by Broke for Free, A Tale of Two Cars by Cory Gray, Badlands by Cory Gray, First Holes by Cory Gray, String Anticipation by Cory Gray, Bed by Jahzzar, Interlude – In Anxious Shadows by Kai Engel, Under Suspicion by Lee Rosevere, Homage by Paniks, Subdivision of the Masses by Philipp Weigl Photo Credit: Ridwan Adhami via www.ridzdesign.com   For More Information: Deepa Kumar, Constructing the Muslim Enemy from the Crusades to 9/11 Deepa Kumar, The Roots of Islamophobia, Jacobin Magazine BRIDGE Initiative, When Islamophobia Turns Violent: The 2016 U.S. Presidential Elections BRIDGE Initiative, Tracking Islamophobia Islamophobia and the Politics of Empire...

Read More
#SayHerName: Black Love in Action
Jul06

#SayHerName: Black Love in Action

In cities across the country, black women – many of whom have been on the front lines of the Movement for Black Lives – are lifting up the names of their sisters killed by police. This March, Manolia Charlotin, a multimedia journalist with the The Media Consortium, and Cat Brooks, artist and organizer with Oakland’s Anti Police-Terror Project sat down at a community event in San Francisco to talk about Say Her Name and what it looks like to build a movement that centers black women. Jamison Robinson, Yuvette Henderson’s brother, talks about the difference it makes when a community comes together to demand justice after the police kill someone.  Featuring: Jamison Robinson, brother of Yuvette Henderson Manolia Charlotin, journalist with The Media Consortium Cat Brooks, artist and organizer with the Anti Police-Terror Project Credits Host: Marie Choi Music: “Railroad’s Whisky Co.” by Jahzzar, “Light, Livid” by Plurabelle, “We Comin’” by Reverend Sekou and the Holy Ghost, “Derailed” by Blue Dot Sessions, Nicolo Scolieri, music selector for the Yuvette Henderson story:  “Unknown Cocek Tune” by Choba, “Tikifite” by Noura Mint Seyma, “Improvisation” by Dave Nelson, “All Our Clocks are Dying” by Ergo Phizmiz Sound Engineers: NaRayan Khalsa, Alexandra Toledo, Clara Lindstrom and Britta Conroy-Randall from The California Institute for Integral Studies’ Public Programs Photo Credits: “Jamison and Yuvette at the BART Station, going to see Disney on Ice.” Photo provided by Jamison Robinson More information Say Her Name, African American Policy Forum Anti-Police Terror Project Black Lives Matter “Making Black Lives Matter” feature by Darwin Bond Graham for the East Bay...

Read More
The Nakba, the Naksa, and the Future of Palestine
Jun01

The Nakba, the Naksa, and the Future of Palestine

In 1948, Zionist militias expelled over 700,000 Palestinians from their villages and towns.  The event, and the ongoing destruction and occupation of Palestine are referred to as the Nakba – the catastrophe.  How did the events of 1948 shape Palestine and its diaspora?   And generations later, how are Palestinians fighting to return home? On this edition of Making Contact we reflect on the Nakba, the Naksa, and the future of Palestine. Featuring:  Rami Almeghari, FSRN reporter Ghazi Misleh, author of I Am from There and I Have Memories Rabab Abdulhadi, Professor of Ethnic Studies and Senior Scholar of the Arab and Muslim Ethnicities and Diasporas Initiative at San Francisco State University Dina from Rammun Mohannad from Ramle Remi Kanazi, poet and author of Before the Next Bomb Drops. Credits Host: Marie Choi Producers: Marie Choi, Monica Lopez, Jasmin Lopez, R.J. Lozada Freelance reporter in Gaza: Rami Almeghari (originally produced for FSRN) Music: HOPE SPOKEN/BROKEN, Shajar Al-Ben instrumental without mix, Qnoun instrumental with out mix, Freedom instrumental without mix Photo:  “Oakland Palestine Solidarity Mural,” Art Forces, Estria Foundation, NorCal Friends of Sabeel, Artists: VYAL and Emory Douglas,Photo by Hilary Hacker Click here to learn more Rami Almeghari, Free Speech Radio News, “Profile: Refugee documents razed village’s history through memory of its displaced” Nakba Survivor, testimonials Remi Kanazi, poet and author of Before the Next Bomb Drops Oakland Palestine Solidarity Mural, Art Forces, Estria Foundation, NorCal Friends of Sabeel Institute for Middle East Understanding, “Nakba Museum Exhibit Opens in...

Read More