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Long Distance Revolutionary
Feb22

Long Distance Revolutionary

Long Distance Revolutionary: A Journey with Mumia Abu-Jamal ⌠Documentary : 2Ol2⌡ Unlike any other film, book, or article produced about Mumia Abu-Jamal, “Mumia: Long Distance Revolutionary” focuses on his career as a prolific author and broadcaster from Pennsylvania’s Death Row. In fact, the film does not deal with Abu-Jamal’s case, but rather chronicles his life and work as a journalist and revolutionary – both prior and post incarceration. After Abu-Jamal is convicted for the murder of of Philadelphia patrolman Daniel Faulkner, the story then exposes Abu-Jamal’s battles with the American court system to continue his work from prison- a battle he continues to wage to this very day. The film was written, produced and directed by Stephen Vittoria. Featuring: Stephen Vittoria, Writer, Editor, Producer, and Director Katyana Farzanrad, Producer Noelle Hanrahan, Producer Mumia Abu-Jamal, is an activist, former Black Panther and radical journalist. Mumia has been imprisoned for 35 years. He spent the first 28.5 years of his imprisonment on Pennsylvania’s death row. In 2011, his death sentence was confirmed unconstitutional by the U.S. Supreme Court and he is now serving a sentence of “life in prison” without parole. He is charged with the 1981 murder, in Philadelphia, of police officer Daniel Faulkner. Credits: Host: Anita Johnson Producers: Anita Johnson, Marie Choi, Monica Lopez, R.J. Lozada Executive Director: Lisa Rudman Audience Engagement Director/Web Editor: Sabine Blaizin Development Associate: Vera Tykulsker More Information: From Mumia to Peltier Demand Treatment For Mumia Mumia The Movie Prison Radio The Feminist Wire Mumia Wins Federal Court Victory On Hep-C Treatment Live From Death Row We Want Freedom All Things Censored All Things Censored Vol. 1 The Classroom and the Cell Jailhouse Lawyers Lucasville Faith of Our Fathers Hardknock Radio Spoken...

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Mirrors of Privilege
Jan10

Mirrors of Privilege

Mirrors of Privilege is a remarkable and engaging  film that explores stories from white men and women about their journeys in overcoming issues of unconscious bias and entitlement. From Shakti Butler, director of “Cracking the Codes: The System of Inequity” and “The Way Home: Women Talk About Race in America,” “Mirrors of Privilege” is a must-see for all people who are interested in justice, spiritual growth and community making. This film advances the argument that with transformative learning, a dialogue for learning, changing, healing, and undoing race-based oppression can begin. It features the experiences and stories of White women and men who are social justice advocates. They have worked to gain insight into what it means, as White people, to challenge notions of race, racism, culture and White identity development in the United States. Their shared reflections speak to the denial, defensiveness, guilt, fear and shame often related to these issues and show how these responses can be replaced with solid commitments towards racial justice. Like this program? Please show us the love. Click here and support our non-profit journalism. Thanks! Featuring: Dr. Shakti Butler Rick Butler John Scott Shirley Gutierrez Peter Shwartz Stefan Dasho World Trust Credits: Host: Anita Johnson Producers: Anita Johnson, Marie Choi, Monica Lopez, R.J. Lozada Executive Director: Lisa Rudman Audience Engagement Director/Web Editor: Sabine Blaizin Development Associate: Vera Tykulsker More Information: Mirrors of Priviledge World Trust Attitudinal Healing Connection Cultures Connecting The People’s Institute for Survival and Beyond Teaching Tolerance White Privilege: Unpacking the Invisible Backpack Colorblind: The Rise of Post-Racial Politics and the Retreat From Racial Equity Angry Black Bitch Post Traumatic Slave Syndrome:America’s Legacy of Enduring Injury and Healing...

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A New Way of Life and the New Underground Railroad

After serving time, finding food, a job and a place to live with a criminal record can become an almost impossible task. On this edition, Women building their own support network after being released from prison. We’ll hear “A New Way of Life and the New Underground Railroad” a documentary by Chris Moore-Backman.

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COINTELPRO 101 (Part 2)
Aug03

COINTELPRO 101 (Part 2)

This week, we broadcast the second half of the documentary film “COINTELPRO 101,” about the secret FBI program which ran from 1956-1971, and disrupted many movements for self-determination by people of color in the U.S.. Today, we hear the second half of the film, produced by the Freedom Archives.

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COINTELPRO 101 (Part 1)
Jul27

COINTELPRO 101 (Part 1)

Over the next two weeks, we broadcast the documentary film “COINTELPRO 101,” about the secret FBI program which ran from 1956-1971, and disrupted many movements for self-determination by people of color in the U.S.. Today, we hear the first half of the film, produced by the Freedom Archives.

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#BlackLivesMatter: Alicia Garza on the Origins of a Movement
Sep15

#BlackLivesMatter: Alicia Garza on the Origins of a Movement

Black Lives Matter. This simple phrase has become the motto of a growing movement calling for true justice and equalty for black people. Alicia Garza, co-founder of Black Lives Matter, first typed out those three words back in 2013. In March of 2015, Alicia Garza visited the University of Southern Maine to tell the story of how Black Lives Matter came to be, and express her hopes for where it’s headed. We hear her speech. Featuring:    Alicia Garza, Black Lives Matter co-founder Cephus Johnson, uncle of Oscar Grant Grace Anderson, protestor Host: Andrew Stelzer Contributing Producers: E.B. Leonard Original Video: Provided by  Maine X Change.   More Information Black Lives Matter http://blacklivesmatter.tumblr.com/ Malcolm X Grassroots Movement National Domestic Workers Alliance Alicia Garza, co-founder of #BlackLivesMatter, speaks at the University of Southern Maine. March 27, 2015. PART 1 PART 2 A Herstory of the #BlackLivesMatter Movement by Alicia Garza Maine X Change Meet the Woman Behind #BlackLivesMatter—The Hashtag That Became a Civil Rights...

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Our Bodies, Our Stories: Reproductive Health Behind Bars

Pregnant women in America’s prisons are being shackled to their beds; others are being sterilized. Correctional institutions claim the policies are for safety’s sake, but thousands of incarcerated people are fighting for control of their own reproductive health.

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Cracking the Codes: Dr. Shakti Butler on the System of Racial Inequity (Encore)

How do we talk about race and racism in this country?Not as deeply as we should, according to filmmaker and educator Dr. Shakti Butler. On this edition, we hear excerpts from Dr. Butler’s film “Cracking the Codes”, and speak with her about using the medium of film to start conversations around the thorny issues of racial inequity. Featuring: Dr. Shakti Butler, World Trust founder and Creative Director Humaira Jackson, Hugh Vasquez, Y. Jelal Huyler, Aeeshah B. Clottey, Ise Lyfe, Cracking the Codes interview subjects. Thank you to production intern Lisa Barfai and to World Trust Educational Services.   More information: World Trust Attitudinal Healing Connection Cultures Connecting The People’s Institute for Survival and Beyond Mixed Heritage Center Teaching Tolerance   Articles & Books White Privilege: Unpacking the Invisible Backpack Colorblind: The Rise of Post-Racial Politics and the Retreat From Racial Equity Angry Black Bitch Post Traumatic Slave Syndrome:America’s Legacy of Enduring Injury and Healing     Cracking the Codes Script Jen Chien: This week on Making Contact… Peggy Mcintosh: So these white women, breaking up over their first experience of hearing about racism. They are basket cases–partly because of their bad, bad education. JC: How do we talk about race and racism in this country? Not as deeply as we should, according to filmmaker and educator Dr. Shakti Butler… Shakti Butler: So we point to the people who are individuals who are people of color who have quote, end-quote, “made” it in this society and of course we have Barack Obama therefore everything is fine. But in fact, that’s not the case. JC: On this edition, we hear excerpts from Dr. Butler’s work, and ask, why she uses the medium of film to start conversations around the thorny issues of racial inequity. I’m Jen Chien, and this is “Making Contact”, a program connecting people, vital ideas, and important information. JC: Dr. Shakti Butler and her organization, World Trust, use documentary film, dialogue and education to address the deep complexities of race and racism. Her latest film, Cracking the Codes: The System of Racial Inequity, looks at the structural and institutional nature of racial injustice by using engaging personal stories, anecdotes, and insights from a variety of people. Let’s listen to a few clips from the film. Humaira Jackson: When I was really young probably up until the age of about eight or nine. The social network the relationships the family friends were all mostly people of South Asian-descent. I wasn’t so aware of myself as a racial being. And then something shifted and at that point I started rejecting my own culture, community. Quite, I think quite drastically. Although there were...

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Greatest hits: Partners in the Struggle-allies in political movements

What does it mean to be an ally in a political movement? From white Americans in the civil rights era, to Israelis in Palestine, to Latino-Americans working with the undocumented…a roundtable discussion on the do’s and don’ts of how to be an effective ally.

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Hawaii: A Voice For Sovereignty

Some call it “Paradise”, but Hawaii isn’t just a tourist getaway. Look beyond the resorts, and you’ll find a history of opposition to US occupation. From sacred sites, to indigenous language, Hawaiians are fighting hard to protect their traditions, and their future. On this edition we hear excerpts from the 2012 film by Catherine Bauknight “Hawaii: A Voice for Sovereignty,” which explores the history of Hawaii – from the beginning of the US occupation up to statehood and the present day.

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