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New Rates! Call for Pitches July 2016

Do you have a story with perspectives on an ongoing local, national, or global issue? Do you have access to voices and perspectives that get lost in mainstream media landscape? Do they have ideas about how to cope, and how to change things? If so, consider pitching to Making Contact!  We’re looking for pitches from freelancers on several themes. NewsFlash #1 We’ve increased our freelance rates! See below. NewsFlash #2  With software from Hearken, our Ever Wonder? widgets ask listeners to suggest questions for reporters to ask. Come experiment with getting these crowd-questions. If your story would benefit from seeking audience input upstream, tell us about that. Seeking Pitches Immigration and Elections: We want your pitches! We’re looking for character-driven stories that focus on how immigrant communities engage in U.S. electoral politics. Here are some themes we’re interested in exploring: How are undocumented communities working around elections to mitigate the U.S. Supreme Court decision halting the expansion of DACA and DAPA? What factors contribute to disparities in electoral participation within different communities? How are immigrant communities addressing mis-information about how to vote, new voter ID laws, and other barriers to participating in elections? Are immigrant communities organizing to put politicians in office?  What are the opportunities and challenges? How are communities organizing outside of the electoral process to influence politics locally and/or nationally? How are groups working against Trump and Trumpism beyond the conventions? How is campaign financing influencing immigration rhetoric and policies? Got an idea, let us know!  Open to all and we are especially  looking for reporters who are themselves immigrants for our Immigrants and Elections miniseries. Guns: We’re looking for stories that bring new perspectives on guns, gun violence, mass shootings, and masculinity. These could be personal stories. They could also be more investigative or explanatory pieces. We’d also welcome other pitches related to guns, maybe a look at one of several states’ legislation to allow or ban concealed carry on college campuses. Occupy, 5 Year Anniversary: For this show, we’re looking for a story about a small town in the U.S. that responded to the call to Occupy a public space as part of Occupy Wall Street. We want to know why they decided to participate 5 years ago. What difference did it make? And what lessons did they carry into their organizing today? People in Prison and Sentencing: We’re looking for stories detailing the effects of the prison systems on children and families, delving into life after incarceration, and stories examining sentence reduction reforms at the state level. For instance in California, Prop 47 passed in Fall 2014. It reduces drug possession and five...

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Deadly Divide: Migrant Death on the Border

Congratulations to Jasmin, George, Bradnon, Mitra and team for this show’s Excellence in Journalism Award from Society of Professional Journalists NorCal,  for Feature Storytelling (radio/audio) 2015 !  Over 6,000 migrant deaths were recorded on the U.S. side of the border with Mexico between 1998 and 2013. The true number of deaths is likely higher, and thousands of families never hear from their loved ones again. This documentary travels to the desert ranch lands of Brooks County and the border town of Reynosa, Tamaulipas to introduce us to the human cost of “prevention through deterrence,” a border enforcement strategy introduced during the Clinton administration. Featuring: Lori Baker, Professor of Anthropology, Baylor University Eduardo Canales, Executive Director, South Texas Human rights Center Elias, Honduran migrant Producer: Jasmin Lopez Editor: George Lavender Sound Design: Mitra Kaboli Photos: Brandon Thibodeaux Poetry: MamaCoAtl Chantiko Music: Diana Gameros Voice over: Juaquin Neault Deadly Divide is a multimedia collaboration between Radio Producer Jasmin Lopez and Photographer Brandon Thibodeaux exploring the human cost of current a border enforcement strategies.                                                                  Click here to see the photos. More information: South Texas Human Rights Center Reuniting Families Project No More Deaths / No Mas Muertos Los Angeles del Desierto National Network for Immigrant and Refugee Rights Articles / Reports Searching for the Living, the Dead and the New Disappeared on the Migrant Trail in Texas Crossing the Line: Human Rights Abuses of Migrants in Short-Term Custody on the Arizona/Sonora Border A Culture of Cruelty: Abuse and Impunity in Short-Term US Border Patrol Custody Recommended Principles and Guidelines for Human Rights at International Borders Statement by NNIRR ED Catherine Tactaquin at UN Launch Event (Oct. 23, 2014) OHCHR Website section on human rights at international borders NNIRR’s International Migrant Rights and Global Justice website section...

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Cracking the Codes: Dr. Shakti Butler on the System of Racial Inequity (Encore)

How do we talk about race and racism in this country?Not as deeply as we should, according to filmmaker and educator Dr. Shakti Butler. On this edition, we hear excerpts from Dr. Butler’s film “Cracking the Codes”, and speak with her about using the medium of film to start conversations around the thorny issues of racial inequity. Featuring: Dr. Shakti Butler, World Trust founder and Creative Director Humaira Jackson, Hugh Vasquez, Y. Jelal Huyler, Aeeshah B. Clottey, Ise Lyfe, Cracking the Codes interview subjects. Thank you to production intern Lisa Barfai and to World Trust Educational Services.   More information: World Trust Attitudinal Healing Connection Cultures Connecting The People’s Institute for Survival and Beyond Mixed Heritage Center Teaching Tolerance   Articles & Books White Privilege: Unpacking the Invisible Backpack Colorblind: The Rise of Post-Racial Politics and the Retreat From Racial Equity Angry Black Bitch Post Traumatic Slave Syndrome:America’s Legacy of Enduring Injury and Healing     Cracking the Codes Script Jen Chien: This week on Making Contact… Peggy Mcintosh: So these white women, breaking up over their first experience of hearing about racism. They are basket cases–partly because of their bad, bad education. JC: How do we talk about race and racism in this country? Not as deeply as we should, according to filmmaker and educator Dr. Shakti Butler… Shakti Butler: So we point to the people who are individuals who are people of color who have quote, end-quote, “made” it in this society and of course we have Barack Obama therefore everything is fine. But in fact, that’s not the case. JC: On this edition, we hear excerpts from Dr. Butler’s work, and ask, why she uses the medium of film to start conversations around the thorny issues of racial inequity. I’m Jen Chien, and this is “Making Contact”, a program connecting people, vital ideas, and important information. JC: Dr. Shakti Butler and her organization, World Trust, use documentary film, dialogue and education to address the deep complexities of race and racism. Her latest film, Cracking the Codes: The System of Racial Inequity, looks at the structural and institutional nature of racial injustice by using engaging personal stories, anecdotes, and insights from a variety of people. Let’s listen to a few clips from the film. Humaira Jackson: When I was really young probably up until the age of about eight or nine. The social network the relationships the family friends were all mostly people of South Asian-descent. I wasn’t so aware of myself as a racial being. And then something shifted and at that point I started rejecting my own culture, community. Quite, I think quite drastically. Although there were...

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Undocumented and Undaunted: DREAMer Artists Speak Out

The struggles of undocumented youth in the US often fly under the radar of the mainstream media. But with the tools of creative expression and the power of social media, a new generation of young immigrants is making sure their voices are heard. On this edition, young undocumented artists speak their truth, as the world listens.

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Harvest of Empire (Part 2)

Why are they here?. Many Latin Americans came to the US because dangerous or deadly conditions-which the American government helped create. In part 2 of “Harvest of Empire” a documentary film written and narrated by Democracy Now’s Juan Gonzalez, we trace the history of Nicaraguan and Salvadoran migration to the U.S.

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Cracking the Codes: Dr. Shakti Butler on the System of Racial Inequity

How do we talk about race and racism in this country? Not as deeply as we should, according to filmmaker and educator Dr. Shakti Butler. On this edition, we hear excerpts from Dr. Butler’s film “Cracking the Codes”, and speak with her about using the medium of film to start conversations around the thorny issues of racial inequity. Featuring: Dr. Shakti Butler, World Trust founder and Creative Director; Humaira Jackson, Hugh Vasquez, Y. Jelal Huyler, Aeeshah B. Clottey, Ise Lyfe, Cracking the Codes interview subject. Thank you to production intern Lisa Barfai and to “”World Trust Educational Services.” See Script Below. More information: World Trust Attitudinal Healing Connection Cultures Connecting The People’s Institute for Survival and Beyond Mixed Heritage Center Teaching Tolerance Articles & Books White Privilege: Unpacking the Invisible Backpack Colorblind: The Rise of Post-Racial Politics and the Retreat From Racial Equity Angry Black Bitch Post Traumatic Slave Syndrome:America’s Legacy of Enduring Injury and Healing http://www.youtube.com/user/WorldTrustTV?feature=watch   Cracking the Codes Script   Jen Chien: This week on Making Contact… Peggy Mcintosh: So these white women, breaking up over their first experience of hearing about racism. They are basket cases–partly because of their bad, bad education. JC: How do we talk about race and racism in this country? Not as deeply as we should, according to filmmaker and educator Dr. Shakti Butler… Shakti Butler: So we point to the people who are individuals who are people of color who have quote, end-quote, “made” it in this society and of course we have Barack Obama therefore everything is fine. But in fact, that’s not the case. JC: On this edition, we hear excerpts from Dr. Butler’s work, and ask, why she uses the medium of film to start conversations around the thorny issues of racial inequity. I’m Jen Chien, and this is “Making Contact”, a program connecting people, vital ideas, and important information. JC: Dr. Shakti Butler and her organization, World Trust, use documentary film, dialogue and education to address the deep complexities of race and racism. Her latest film, Cracking the Codes: The System of Racial Inequity, looks at the structural and institutional nature of racial injustice by using engaging personal stories, anecdotes, and insights from a variety of people. Let’s listen to a few clips from the film. Humaira Jackson: When I was really young probably up until the age of about eight or nine. The social network the relationships the family friends were all mostly people of South Asian-descent. I wasn’t so aware of myself as a racial being. And then something shifted and at that point I started rejecting my own culture, community. Quite, I think quite drastically....

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Manufacturing Terror: The Media’s Anti-Arab and Anti-Muslim Problem

After the Boston Marathon bombing, journalists scrambled to identify those responsible for the attack, and their motive. Rolling news and online message boards were filled with speculation, many pointing the finger at Muslims and Arabs. Does the media reinforce anti-Arab and anti-Muslim stereotypes? Featuring: Adel Iskandar, media and communications scholar; Mike German, ACLU Washington Legislative Office senior policy council; Maytha Alhassen, University of Southern California Provost Ph.D. Fellow in American Studies and Ethnicity; Ahmed Shihab-Eldin, HuffPost Live co-founding member Special thanks to The Media Democracy Fund and The Media Consortium for funding our travel to the National Conference on Media Reform More information Full panel: Manufacturing Terror: The Media’s Anti-Arab and Anti-Muslim Problem Social media’s rush to judgement Decoding the Invisible Whiteness In Boston Bombing Coverage The Tangled Meanings—and Misuses—of ‘Radicalization’ Obama’s rush to judgment: Was the Boston bombing really a “terrorist” act? Jon Stewart mocks CNN’s new ‘responsible’ reporting on Boston bombing Film review: “Planet of the Arabs” and “Arabs A...

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Undocumented and Undaunted: DREAMer Artists Speak Out

The struggles of undocumented youth in the US often fly under the radar of the mainstream media. But with the tools of creative expression and the power of social media, a new generation of young immigrants is making sure their voices are heard. On this edition, young undocumented artists speak their truth, as the world listens.

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Beats, Rhymes and Laughs: Culture As a Tool for Racial Justice

Artists and creative people have always used culture as a tool for social change. On this edition, excerpts from a panel on racial justice, culture and politics featuring some of today’s most insightful and outspoken artists.

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The Penalty is Exile: How Immigration and Criminalization Collide

Under President Obama more than 1 million people have been deported from the United States. Immigration officials claim that many of those being deported are criminals. On this edition, producer Cory Fischer-Hoffman investigates the connection between immigration and the criminal justice system and the impact this burgeoning relationship is having on immigrants.

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