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Listen to our extended interview with Stanley Nelson on “The Black Panthers: Vanguard of the Revolution”
Feb26

Listen to our extended interview with Stanley Nelson on “The Black Panthers: Vanguard of the Revolution”

Stanley Nelson’s “The Black Panthers: Vanguard of the Revolution” has sparked a renewed interest in the famed revolutionary organization. In November journalist Eric Arnold interviews Nelson for our show. Now listen to the full unedited...

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The Black Panthers: Vanguard of the Revolution
Feb24

The Black Panthers: Vanguard of the Revolution

2016 marks 50 years since the founding of the Black Panther Party-a group that’s took the world by the storm, but is still widely misunderstood.   There’s a new documentary film that’s trying to set the record straight. On this edition of Making Contact, journalist Eric Arnold talks with Stanley Nelson, director of The Black Panthers, Vanguard of the Revolution. Featuring: Stanley Nelson, Director of The Black Panthers: Vanguard of the Revolution Eric Arnold,...

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We Are the Bomb: Boots Riley and Dave Zirin Talk Activism and Politics
Feb10

We Are the Bomb: Boots Riley and Dave Zirin Talk Activism and Politics

Rapper and grassroots organizer Boots Riley’s recent book is titled “Tell Homeland Security: We Are the Bomb”. Riley appeared at Politics and Prose bookstore in Washington DC, where he was interviewed by author and Edge of Sports blogger Dave Zirin. Special thanks to Politics and Prose Bookstore & Coffeehouse Featuring: Boots Riley, “Tell Homeland Security: We Are the Bomb” author Dave Zirin, “Edge of Sports” blogger More information: Tell Homeland Security: We Are the Bomb by Boots Riley Politics and Prose Bookstore & Coffeehouse The Coup Boots Riley on Twitter Edge of Sports Dave Zirin on Twitter...

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A Dream Remembered?: Martin Luther King Jr and the Grassroots Civil Rights Movement
Jan13

A Dream Remembered?: Martin Luther King Jr and the Grassroots Civil Rights Movement

On the steps of the Lincoln Memorial on August 28th 1963, Martin Luther King Jr delivered one of the most famous speeches of all time. But it nearly didn’t happen. On this special edition of Making Contact for MLK Day, Gary Younge, author of “The Speech” talks about Martin Luther King Junior’s “Dream” and the story behind it.   Producer: George Lavender Special thanks to the New School for use of their recording. Featuring: Gary Younge, author of “The Speech: Martin Luther King Jr’s Dream and the Story Behind...

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The Black Panthers: Vanguard of the Revolution
Nov04

The Black Panthers: Vanguard of the Revolution

2016 marks 50 years since the founding of the Black Panther Party-a group that’s took the world by the storm, but is still widely misunderstood.   There’s a new documentary film that’s trying to set the record straight. On this edition of Making Contact, journalist Eric Arnold talks with Stanley Nelson, director of The Black Panthers, Vanguard of the Revolution. Featuring: Stanley Nelson, Director of Black Panthers: vanguard of the Revolution Eric Arnold,...

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#BlackLivesMatter: Alicia Garza on the Origins of a Movement
Sep15

#BlackLivesMatter: Alicia Garza on the Origins of a Movement

Black Lives Matter. This simple phrase has become the motto of a growing movement calling for true justice and equalty for black people. Alicia Garza, co-founder of Black Lives Matter, first typed out those three words back in 2013. In March of 2015, Alicia Garza visited the University of Southern Maine to tell the story of how Black Lives Matter came to be, and express her hopes for where it’s headed. We hear her speech. Featuring:    Alicia Garza, Black Lives Matter co-founder Cephus Johnson, uncle of Oscar Grant Grace Anderson, protestor Host: Andrew Stelzer Contributing Producers: E.B. Leonard Original Video: Provided by  Maine X Change.   More Information Black Lives Matter http://blacklivesmatter.tumblr.com/ Malcolm X Grassroots Movement National Domestic Workers Alliance Alicia Garza, co-founder of #BlackLivesMatter, speaks at the University of Southern Maine. March 27, 2015. PART 1 PART 2 A Herstory of the #BlackLivesMatter Movement by Alicia Garza Maine X Change Meet the Woman Behind #BlackLivesMatter—The Hashtag That Became a Civil Rights...

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Not Throw Away Women: Black and Indigenous Women Disrupt Violence
Sep09

Not Throw Away Women: Black and Indigenous Women Disrupt Violence

On this week’s show we’re exploring how some women have been dehumanized to the point of indifference. We’ll learn how one community is undoing the silence around the violence women of color face. We’ll also hear about how serial killers were able to hunt down mostly Black women for three decades in South Los Angeles. Then we’ll take you to the Yucatan where pregnant indigenous women struggle under a health care system failing to provide proper medical care. Featuring: Rochelle Robinson, Making Contact Fellow Kimberly Smith, community member attending Her Resilience mural project Gabrielle Rae Travis,  Her Resilience Community Outreach Coordinator Margaret Prescod founder of Black Coalition Fighting Back Serial Murders and host of KPFK’s Sojourner Truth Mirna Aracely Tuz Acosta, Safe Maternity for the Indigenous Population in East Yucatan Neyi Amparo Cime Arceo, resident of Xanlah. Thanks to the Mary Wohlford Foundation for funding towards this program. Host: Laura Flynn and Jasmin Lopez Contributing Producers: Rochelle Robinson and Karen Stefan Tenorio Featured music: Blue Dot Sessions, Farsical Slow Driver, Inside the Origami Violin, Tanguedo Trans Alp, Gnossienne N1, Gnossienne N3 Black Ant, Fater Lee Broke For Free, Night Owl Phour Trakk, Long Transfer Kai Engel, Written in Ink More information: Her Resilience Kimberly Robertson’s obituary Black Coalition Fighting Back Serial Murders Sojourner Truth Radio HBO Tales of the Grim Sleeper LA Weekly, Grim Sleeper Returns: He’s Murdering Angelenos, As Cops Hunt His DNA The Grim Sleeper timeline Nick Broomfield Sociedad Mexicana Pro Derechos de la Mujer, A.C. Accountability in Maternal and Reproductive Health: Experiences from Civil Society from India, Mexico, and Nigeria Femicide in Mexico: Mapping of Silence Archival Footage: AP, New Sketches of California Serial Killer, December 18, 2009 ABC News, Grim Sleepers Mysterious Photos Normalizing Violence Puts Black Women’s Lives at Risk Making Contact’s fellow Rochelle Robinson brings us this story exploring how violence against women, especially women of color, is so pervasive that we’re numbed into thinking it’s nothing less than normal. While the homicide rate for Black women has decreased over the years nationwide, in 2010, the rate was twice as high for Black women than all female victims combined.  In this story the first voice you’ll hear is Kimberly Smith, and then Rochelle Robinson as they talk about their own brushes with death. How Serial Killers Stalked Black Women in South Los Angeles In the 1980s in South Los Angeles more than a dozen black women were murdered. Many of these women’s bodies were found in parks, alleyways, and dumpsters.It’s believed somewhere between 3 and 5 different serial killers were targeting the South LA community in the 80s and 90s. One suspect, Lonnie Franklin, Jr.,...

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Changing Communities, Imminent Threats: Katrina’s Legacy

On August 29, 2005 Hurricane Katrina ripped through the Southern Gulf Coast. Drawn by reconstruction work, the number of Latino immigrants has nearly doubled. Reconstruction after Hurricane Katrina drew thousands of people from India, Brazil, Mexico, Honduras, and other Latin American countries.  Workers were charged with pulling dead bodies from abandoned homes and rebuilding New Orleans. But the influx of migrant workers also increased immigration crackdowns. Making Contact’s Jasmin Lopez follows Jose Monterubio, a reconstruction worker. He tells us about his detention and how he stands for immigrant rights with the support of Congress of Day Laborers. Next, Jose Torres Tama recites Corporate Coyotes Smuggle Immigrant Workers, a poem from his book Immigrant Dreams, Alien Nightmares. Ten years later after hurricane Katrina, it’s estimated there are nearly 100,000 fewer African Americans living in the city of New Orleans.  Andrew Stelzer visits the Lower 9th Ward Living Museum, to learn how some are trying to preserve the lessons and legacies of the past. And we talk to a resident of one of the ultramodern homes built by Brad Pitt’s Make it Right project. As a new lower 9th ward emerges, what will it look like and who will be included in the remake? Featuring: Luis Medina, immigrant reconstruction worker Jose Monterrubio, immigrant reconstruction worker Jose Torres-Tama, artist Robert Green, Lower 9th Ward resident Beck Cooper, Director of the Lower 9th Ward Living Museum New Orleans Reconstruction Workers Fight to Remain On August 29, 2005, Hurricane Katrina ripped through the Southern Gulf Coast. Katrina left a trail of devastation stretching for years to come. Ten years later, it’s estimated there are nearly 100,000 fewer African Americans living in the city of New Orleans. Drawn by reconstruction work, the number of Latino immigrants has nearly doubled. Reconstruction after Hurricane Katrina drew thousands of people from India, Brazil, Mexico, Honduras, and other Latin American countries. Workers were charged with pulling dead bodies from abandoned homes and rebuilding New Orleans. But the influx of migrant workers also increased immigration crackdowns.   The Lower 9th Ward Lives On 10 years ago, the Lower 9th Ward became infamous for being the most intensely flooded part of New Orleans. Its population is now a fraction of what it once was. The exodus not only decimated a community, but threatens to erase the history of this largely poor, African-American district which is rich with both community, and controversy. Authorities intentionally blew up the levees and flooded the lower 9th on purpose back in 1927—that left a scar of distrust of authorities that lasts to the present day. We visit the Lower 9th Ward Living Museum, to learn how some...

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Getting Out: the journey out of prison

Nationally, American prisons release more than 650,000 people into society every year. That’s equivalent to the entire population of Memphis or Boston.  On this edition, producer Aaron Mendelson followed ex-prisoner Kevin Tindall on his journey out of prison. Special thanks to Claire Schoen and the University of California Berkeley, School of Journalism. Featuring:    Gordon Brown, ex-prisoner Monta Kevin Tindall, ex-prisoner Jerry Elster, ex-prisoner Tom Gorham, Program Director Options Recovery Services Barry Krisberg, Director of Research and Policy and Lecturer in Residence at Chief Justice Earl Warren Institute on Law and Social Policy, UC Berkeley Debra Mendoza, former parole officer, consultant More information San Quentin State Prison Pathways To Resilience Impact Hub Oakland How is Life Outside After Being in Prison for Over 20 Years? After prison building a new life means more than just doing...

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Bodily Safety: Ta-Nehisi Coates on Police Shootings

When journalist Ta-Nehisi Coates set out to write about police killings he went to visit Mable Jones. Back in 2000, Jones son, a friend of Coates from their time at Howard University, was shot and killed by police in Virginia. He was twenty five years old. Written in the form of a letter to his own teenage son, Coates’ book “Between the World and Me” puts police shootings in a wider context. Ta-Nehisi Coates spoke as part of the Lannan Foundation’s Pursuit of Cultural Freedom Series. Featuring: Ta-Nehisi Coates, author, journalist, educator Credits Host: George Lavender Music: Hellenica- Night Creeper Lannan Foundation’s Pursuit of Cultural Freedom Series More information: Ta-Nehisi Coates Ta-Nehisi Coates on Twitter Cases Tied to Killing Of Jones Are Dropped; Officer Who Shot Student Initiated Probe Lannan Foundation: Ta-Nehisi Coates with Michele Norris Officer Liable in Student’s Killing The Counted Black Victim, Black Cop, Black...

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