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Women Rising 30: International Slavery and Human Trafficking
Mar09

Women Rising 30: International Slavery and Human Trafficking

Women Rising Radio #30 profiles women fighting slavery, trafficking and forced labor globally. Featuring: Ima Matul, with CAST LA, was trafficked to Los Angeles, was rescued by the Coalition Against Slavery and Trafficking in Los Angeles, and now heads CAST’s leadership program. Joanna Ewart-James is the executive director of WALK FREE, an online and on-the-ground network battling trafficking, forced labor, and servitude worldwide. WALK FREE is based in London. Elena Uraleva is an independent human rights monitor in her home country of Uzbekistan.  She works with WALK FREE to document forced labor and human rights abuses there. Supriya Awasthi works on children’s rights and on freeing bonded slaves in India.  She is a staff member of FREE THE SLAVES. Credits Producer: Lynn Feinerman Host: Sandina Robbins Audio Engineer: Vanessa Lowe Additional Audio: Monica Lopez, Stephanie Welch Other Staff: Meerim Ilyas, Urgent Action Fund for Women, Umida Niyazova,  Journalist, Russia More information: The Universal Declaration of Human Rights | United Nations Global Report on Trafficking in Persons Forced labour, human trafficking and...

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China’s Reproductive Regime: Mei Fong & Barbara Demick on China’s one child policy
Mar02

China’s Reproductive Regime: Mei Fong & Barbara Demick on China’s one child policy

January 2016 marked the end of China’s one child policy—a regime of family planning policies and enforcement that scarred generations of parents and children. On this edition of Making Contact, China correspondent Gady Epstein speaks with Mei Fong, author of One Child:The Story of China’s Most Radical Experiment, and Barbara Demick, journalist and former Beijing bureau chief for the Los Angeles Times. Featuring: Mei Fong, author of One Child:The Story of China’s Most Radical Experiment Barbara Demick, , journalist and former Beijing bureau chief for the Los Angeles Times Gady Epstein, China correspondent for The Economist. Credits Host: Monica Lopez Producers: Laura Flynn, Monica Lopez, Andrew Stelzer, Jasmin Lopez Original Content Producers: New America NYC and ChinaFile Special Thanks: Mary Wohlford Foundation for funding our Reproductive Justice beat More information New America NYC Mei Fong, author and...

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Failing Our Youth: An Inadequate Foster Care System
Feb03

Failing Our Youth: An Inadequate Foster Care System

This show takes a look at issues within the foster care system in the U.S. from the high rate of teen pregnancy to the alarming use of psychiatric medications in California’s foster care system. Featuring: Nicole Rocke, former foster youth Kyle Lafferty, the National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy Linda Bryant, Clinical Professor at New York University’s School of Social Work Benita Miller, Deputy Commissioner of Family Permanency Services at the Administration of Children’s Services Lorraine Jacobs, caseworker Yolanda Vasquez, former foster youth Adriane Fugh-Berman, Pharmacology Professor at Georgetown University’s Medical Center Bill Grimm, Attorney at National Center for Youth Law Susan Bullard David Arrendondo, Child psychiatrist Dr. Edmund Levin, at the Lincoln Child Center Nancy Forster, Therapist at the Lincoln Child Center April Rene Sanders, former foster youth and recipient of AB12 Kyle Sporleader, Statewide Legislative Coordinator for California Youth Connection (CYC) Credits: Host: Jasmin Lopez Contributing Producer: Leticia Miranda, Bay Area News Group Special thanks to the Bay Area News Group. Music: Quiet Orchestra, My Friend Jahzzar, Siesta Jahzzar, The Flowers Are Still Standing Poor Alexei, The Long Goodbye Cory Gray, Build a View Show Segments Teen Pregnancy and Foster Care Foster girls are 2.5 times more likely to become pregnant by the time they’re 19 than their peers outside of foster care. Some researchers estimate that about half the girls in foster care become pregnant in their teens. At the same time, foster care systems across the country do not have the proper resources and support systems for young women in care to learn about reproductive health and then birth and raise children. This is a story about Nicole Rocke who became pregnant at 16 in her first year living in a Brooklyn foster home. From Foster Care to College Typically turning 18 has also meant aging out of the system. So no more reimbursements to subsidize care. Studies show foster youth lacking financial support face higher rates of homelessness and incarceration; and fewer finish high school or go to college. To help ease the transition into adulthood, in 2008 the federal government allowed states to claim reimbursements for the cost of foster care to the age of 21. California’s version helped one young woman gain control of her life. Making Contact’s Laura Flynn has the story More Information Drugging Our Kids – Full documentary: http://webspecial.mercurynews.com/druggedkids/ California Youth Connection Chapin Hill at the University of Chicago: Midwest Evaluation of the Adult Functioning of Former Foster Youth Chapin Hill at the University of Chicago: Findings from the California Youth Transitions to Adulthood Study (CalYOUTH) National Conference of State Legislatures: Extending Foster Care Beyond 18 California Fostering Connections to Success: Resource page...

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Abortion Access Under Attack
Jan20

Abortion Access Under Attack

Special edition of Making Contact with guest Host, Rose Aguilar discussing reproductive health and abortion rights 43 years after Roe v. Wade. Featuring: Corrine Rivera-Fowler, deputy director of COLOR, the Colorado Organization for Latina Opportunity and Reproductive Rights Carol Joffe, professor at the Bixby Center for Global Reproductive Health at the University of California, San Francisco and author of “Dispatches from the Abortion Wars: The Cost of Fanaticism to Doctors, Patients, and the Rest of Us.” Credits Host: Rose Aguilar Producers: Laura Flynn and Jasmin Lopez Contributing Producer: Lisa Rudman Song: Alcantara by Indian Wells Photo: CC / by Steve Rhodes “Clinic defense of Planned Parenthood in San Francisco” More information COLOR (Colorado Organization for Latina Opportunity and Reproductive Rights) UCSF, Bixby Center “Dispatches from the Abortion Wars: The Cost of Fanaticism to Doctors, Patients, and the Rest of Us” RH Reality Check: Anti-Choice Legislation Mills Descend on Colorado, Report Finds...

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Abortion Access and Eroded Rights
Dec09

Abortion Access and Eroded Rights

In 1973 the Supreme Court case Roe v. Wade established the legal right to abortion in the United States. Since then, state legislative and executive bodies have battled to restrict access to abortions. Federal law banned the use of federal funds for most abortions in 1977, and public funding for abortion remains a contested issue. One recent study in Texas found that more than 200,000 women performed abortions on themselves because they weren’t able to find clinical services. From restrictive laws to a lack of information to violent attacks, the blocking of abortion access is eroding the reproductive rights of women. On this edition, we hear from women at the New Orleans Abortion Fund and Ibis Reproductive Health, as well as experiences from a doctor who provides abortions and a woman that sought abortion access in New Orleans, Louisiana. Featuring: Jessie Nieblas, New Orleans Abortion Fund Liza Fuentes, Ibis Reproductive Health Natalie, teacher in New Orleans Diary excerpt from Dr. Susan Wicklund, an abortion provider under attack, as performed for Making Contact by Words of Choice with Actor Claudia Scheider, Directed by Francesca Mantani Arkus, Created and Produced by Cindy Cooper    Credits Music: Ketsa, Will Bangs Special Thanks to The Mary Wohlford Foundation for partial funding of this program. More information http://neworleansabortionfund.org/home http://www.ibisreproductivehealth.org/ http://wordsofchoice.org/ The Toll of Violent Anti Abortion Speech ‘Roe’ Revisited: The Path From Texas to SCOTUS for HB 2 Up to 240,000 Women Have Tried to Give Themselves Abortions in Texas How Bobby Jindal Threw Reproductive Health Under the Bus for His Presidential Bid Construction of New Orleans Planned Parenthood Abortion Biz Continues Despite Protests #is100enough Photo  by Debra...

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Invisible Workers, Laboring in the Shadows
Oct21

Invisible Workers, Laboring in the Shadows

Millions of people around the world work in jobs that aren’t formally recognized or afforded legal protections typical of wage earning jobs. They’re often not even thought of as legitimate work. On this edition of Making Contact, we’re going to meet people making work where there is no work for them. From recyclers, to border couriers, to waste pickers, we’re exploring the informal labor sector and what some are doing to gain greater recognition, protections, and rights. Featuring Landon Goodwin, recycler and pastor and also featured in documentary Dogtown Redemption Aicha al Azzouzi border courier Salma al Azzouzi, Aicha’s oldest daughter Charles Gachanga Gichonge, creator of the Mustard Seed Courtyard clean-up campaign Antony Makau, Dandora resident Richard Munene, Dandora restaurant owner Sally Roever, Urban Policy Director for Women in Informal Employment Globalizing and Organizing (WIEGO) Malati Gadgil, KKPKP Credits Host: Laura Flynn Contributing Producers: Thalia Beaty, Maggy Donaldson, and Beenish Ahmed Featured Music: Blue Dot Sessions: Lesser Gods of Metal, Tyrano Theme, and Pavement Hack, Tours: Enthusiast, Salomé Lego Playset: La Lutte, Comme Experience Intérieure, Janneh: Humajataritee Photo Credits: Thalia Beaty and Maggy Donaldson Show segments An Unusual but Legal Trade: the “Mule Women” of Morocco This slideshow requires JavaScript. We head to the Spanish enclave Ceuta bordering Morocco. The border is a gateway for a brisk trade. Moroccan markets sell goods imported from Spain at a discount for buyers. But that discount comes at a price — for the Moroccan women who bring those goods across the border…on their backs. Co-reported with Maggy Donaldson, Thalia Beaty brings us this story. From dump site to Mustard Seed Courtyards There’s a neighborhood in Nairobi, Kenya that doubles as the city’s main garbage dump. More than 900 tons of trash are piled into Dandora every day. It was declared full more than a decade ago, but the trucks kept coming — dropping everything from household scraps to medical waste. The waste has polluted the water, soil, and air according to the report, Trash and Tragedy by Concern Worldwide. And it has compromised the health of more than 200,000 people. Often the trucks also dump garbage into the surrounding courtyards of residents. While an estimated 10,000 people earn money by mining the trash for recyclables, even those who work at the dump don’t want to live in a dump. Reporter Beenish Ahmed has the story of a community-driven clean-up effort in Dandora. More information: Dogtown Redemption Concern Worldwide: Trash and Tragedy, the impact of garbage on human rights in Nairobi City Women in Informal Employment: Globalizing and Organizing SWaCH (Solid Waste Collection and Handling or, officially, the SWaCH Seva Sahakari Sanstha Maryadit,...

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