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Long Distance Revolutionary
Feb22

Long Distance Revolutionary

Long Distance Revolutionary: A Journey with Mumia Abu-Jamal ⌠Documentary : 2Ol2⌡ Unlike any other film, book, or article produced about Mumia Abu-Jamal, “Mumia: Long Distance Revolutionary” focuses on his career as a prolific author and broadcaster from Pennsylvania’s Death Row. In fact, the film does not deal with Abu-Jamal’s case, but rather chronicles his life and work as a journalist and revolutionary – both prior and post incarceration. After Abu-Jamal is convicted for the murder of of Philadelphia patrolman Daniel Faulkner, the story then exposes Abu-Jamal’s battles with the American court system to continue his work from prison- a battle he continues to wage to this very day. The film was written, produced and directed by Stephen Vittoria. Featuring: Stephen Vittoria, Writer, Producer, and Director Mumia Abu-Jamal, is an activist, former Black Panther and radical journalist. Mumia has been imprisoned for 35 years. He spent the first 28.5 years of his imprisonment on Pennsylvania’s death row. In 2011, his death sentence was confirmed unconstitutional by the U.S. Supreme Court and he is now serving a sentence of “life in prison” without parole. He is charged with the 1981 murder, in Philadelphia, of police officer Daniel Faulkner. Credits: Host: Anita Johnson Producers: Anita Johnson, Marie Choi, Monica Lopez, R.J. Lozada Executive Director: Lisa Rudman Audience Engagement Director/Web Editor: Sabine Blaizin Development Associate: Vera Tykulsker More Information: From Mumia to Peltier Demand Treatment For Mumia Mumia The Movie Prison Radio The Feminist Wire Mumia Wins Federal Court Victory On Hep-C Treatment Live From Death Row We Want Freedom All Things Censored All Things Censored Vol. 1 The Classroom and the Cell Jailhouse Lawyers Lucasville Faith of Our Fathers Hardknock Radio Spoken...

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Building Resistance: Japanese Imprisonment and the Fight Against a Muslim Registry
Feb14

Building Resistance: Japanese Imprisonment and the Fight Against a Muslim Registry

This year is the 75th anniversary of we now call Japanese Internment.  And every year since 1942, Japanese Americans have tried to get the rest of us to remember what happened. To notice the scar that mass incarceration left, not just on the Japanese community, but on all of us. We found ourselves at  similar crossroads in 2001 when the Bush Administration used the chaos of 9/11 to push through drastic changes, including the creation of a Muslim registry called NSEERS, the National Security Entry Exit Registration System. But, people fought it. And won. Today, as President Trump moves  to ban Muslims from entering the U.S. and threatens to build another registry we are faced with similar choices.  So, what can we learn from our history?  And how do we fight back?  Photo Credit: Tomorrow, Inshallah Like this program? Please show us the love. Click here and support our non-profit journalism. Thanks! Featuring: Satsuki Ina, Documentarian Mutsu Homma, Roy Ebihara, George Murihiro, Matsuo Watanabe, Survivors Joseph Arsinoe, US Soldier War Relocation Authority Lara Kiswani, Executive Director of the Arab Resource and Organizing Center Anirvan Chatterjee, Alliance of South Asians Taking Action Liz Ouyang, Attorney Mohammad Sarfaraz Hussain; Anirvan Chatterjee, Alliance of South Asians Taking Action Jason Prado, Sophie Xie, DoBetter.Tech Credits: Host and Contributing Producer: Salima Hamirani Making Contact Producer for this episode: Marie Choi Producers: Anita Johnson, Marie Choi, Monica Lopez, R.J. Lozada Executive Director: Lisa Rudman Audience Engagement Director/Web Editor: Sabine Blaizin Development Associate: Vera Tykulsker Music: Linda Kako Caplan 2008 Anniversary Concert – Aoi umi SFPL Shoko Hikage Koto Studio – Ame Mizu Shizuku Pablo GBeats Star Wars Imperial March Rap Beat Just A Tune – Star Wars Istanbul Film Music Orchestra – Star Wars Duel of the Fates Rameses B – Star Wars More Information: Arab Resource and Organizing Center Alliance of South Asians Taking Action DoBetter.Tech Densho Archives FILM Whose Children Are These Suyama Project Gary Okihiro, “Japanese Resistance in America’s Concentration Camps, A Re-evaluation” CAIR Arab American Association of NY DRUM NYC Sikh Coalition New York Immigration Coalition Families for Freedom AALDEF Arab American Action Network MPower Change Asian Americans Advancing Justice National Network of Arab American Communities Never...

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Dr. Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor “From #BlackLivesMatter to Black Liberation”
Jan23

Dr. Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor “From #BlackLivesMatter to Black Liberation”

Is whitelash enough of an explainer for the rise of President Donald Trump? Is it rigorous enough to blame the people who didn’t show up to vote for our impending collective struggle under this administration? On this edition, we hear from Dr. Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor, assistant professor in the Department of African American Studies at Princeton University. Dr. Taylor most recently wrote, “From Black Lives Matter to Black Liberation.” We’ll be sharing a talk with Dr. Taylor’s insights on Black Liberation as framed through this most recent election.  Special thanks to KPFA for hosting and recording Dr. Taylor’s speech. Like this program? Please show us the love. Click here and support our non-profit journalism. Thanks! Featuring: Dr. Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor, author of “From #BlackLivesMatter to Black Liberation,” assistant professor of African American Studies at Princeton University Credits: Host: R.J. Lozada Producers: Anita Johnson, Marie Choi, Monica Lopez, R.J. Lozada, Andrew Stelzer Executive Director: Lisa Rudman Audience Engagement Director/Web Editor: Sabine Blaizin Development Associate: Vera Tykulsker More Information:  From #BlackLivesMatter to Black Liberation Keeanga–Yamahtta Taylor on Black Lives Matter and Black Liberation “Achieving Black Liberation: A Conversation With Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor”...

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A Dream Remembered?: Martin Luther King Jr and the Grassroots Civil Rights Movement
Jan17

A Dream Remembered?: Martin Luther King Jr and the Grassroots Civil Rights Movement

On the steps of the Lincoln Memorial on August 28th 1963, Martin Luther King Jr. delivered one of the most famous speeches of all time. But it nearly didn’t happen. On this special edition of Making Contact for MLK Day, Gary Younge, author of “The Speech” talks about Martin Luther King Jr.’s Dream and the story behind it. Special thanks to The New School for the recording. Featuring: Gary Younge, author of “The Speech: Martin Luther King Jr.’s Dream and the Story Behind It” Credits: Host: George Lavender Producers: Anita Johnson, Marie Choi, Monica Lopez, R.J. Lozada Executive Director: Lisa Rudman Audience Engagement Director/Web Editor: Sabine Blaizin Development Associate: Vera Tykulsker More Information: Gary Younge The New...

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Mirrors of Privilege
Jan10

Mirrors of Privilege

Mirrors of Privilege is a remarkable and engaging  film that explores stories from white men and women about their journeys in overcoming issues of unconscious bias and entitlement. From Shakti Butler, director of “Cracking the Codes: The System of Inequity” and “The Way Home: Women Talk About Race in America,” “Mirrors of Privilege” is a must-see for all people who are interested in justice, spiritual growth and community making. This film advances the argument that with transformative learning, a dialogue for learning, changing, healing, and undoing race-based oppression can begin. It features the experiences and stories of White women and men who are social justice advocates. They have worked to gain insight into what it means, as White people, to challenge notions of race, racism, culture and White identity development in the United States. Their shared reflections speak to the denial, defensiveness, guilt, fear and shame often related to these issues and show how these responses can be replaced with solid commitments towards racial justice. Like this program? Please show us the love. Click here and support our non-profit journalism. Thanks! Featuring: Dr. Shakti Butler Rick Butler John Scott Shirley Gutierrez Peter Shwartz Stefan Dasho World Trust Credits: Host: Anita Johnson Producers: Anita Johnson, Marie Choi, Monica Lopez, R.J. Lozada Executive Director: Lisa Rudman Audience Engagement Director/Web Editor: Sabine Blaizin Development Associate: Vera Tykulsker More Information: Mirrors of Priviledge World Trust Attitudinal Healing Connection Cultures Connecting The People’s Institute for Survival and Beyond Teaching Tolerance White Privilege: Unpacking the Invisible Backpack Colorblind: The Rise of Post-Racial Politics and the Retreat From Racial Equity Angry Black Bitch Post Traumatic Slave Syndrome:America’s Legacy of Enduring Injury and Healing...

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Fallen Heroes of 2016
Dec26

Fallen Heroes of 2016

Thousands of local social justice organizers passed away this year. People doing crucial work in their communities, whose deaths didn’t make the headlines.  On this edition of Making Contact, we’ll hear about some of the fallen heroes of 2016. Like this program? Please show us. Click here and support our non-profit journalism. Thanks! Can you recognize the title & Fallen Artist of each song in this show?  We’ll list their names and songs in our newsletter.  Don’t miss the answers in January — Sign Up Here. Featuring: Joani Blank, Founder of Good Vibrations Carol Queen, Sexologist Darren Seals, Ferguson Activist Ebony Williams, Chosen Diamonds Mentor Berta Caceres, Co-Founder of the Council of Popular & Indigenous Organizations of Honduras (COPINH) Silvio Carillo, Journalist and Nephew of Berta Caceres Cedric Robinson, UC Santa Barbara Professor and Author of Black Marxism: The Making of the Black Radical Tradition Robin Kelley, UCLA Black Studies and History Professor Tom Rainey-Smith, Amnesty International Korea Coordinator, speaking about Baek Nam-gi activist farmer in South Korea Luis de la Garza, Member of La Colectiva Horacio N. Roque Ramirez, Queer Latin@ Oral Historian and with a postsctript, Ben Bagdikian, Washington Post Editor who helped publish The Pentagon Papers and was dean of the Graduate School of Journalism at the University of California, Berkeley from ’85-’88. He was perhaps best known as the author of “The Media Monopoly” (1983), which warned that freedom of expression and independent journalism were threatened by the consolidation of news and entertainment outlets in a shrinking circle of corporate owners. Credits: Host: Andrew Stelzer Producers: Anita Johnson, Marie Choi, Monica Lopez, R.J. Lozada, Andrew Stelzer Executive Director: Lisa Rudman Audience Engagement Director/Web Editor: Sabine Blaizin Development Associate: Vera Tykulsker   More Information: Council of Popular & Indigenous Organizations of Honduras Cedric J. Robinson: the Making of a Black Radical Intellectual Horacio N. Roque Ramírez: Presente! Robin D. G. Kelley Joani Blank Good Vibrations Carol Queen Justice for Berta Silvio Carrillo The Malleable Memory of Darren Seals Who killed Ferguson activist Darren Seals? Who Killed Darren Seals and Why Farmer Baek Nam-gi Dies in South Korea After South Korean farmer’s death, family continues fight for justice Berta Cáceres, Honduran human rights and environment activist, murdered Black Marxism: The Making of the Black Radical Tradition In Memoriam: Horacio N. Roque Ramirez Radical Thought: Cedric J. Robinson Korean farmer Baek Nam Gi-Korean critically injured by police water cannons How Muhammad Ali influenced the Civil Rights Movement The Media Monopoly 6th Edition by Ben H. Bagdikian Goldman Prize Recipient Berta Cáceres...

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