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COINTELPRO 101 (Part 1)
Jul27

COINTELPRO 101 (Part 1)

Over the next two weeks, we broadcast the documentary film “COINTELPRO 101,” about the secret FBI program which ran from 1956-1971, and disrupted many movements for self-determination by people of color in the U.S.. Today, we hear the first half of the film, produced by the Freedom Archives.

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#SayHerName: Black Love in Action
Jul06

#SayHerName: Black Love in Action

In cities across the country, black women – many of whom have been on the front lines of the Movement for Black Lives – are lifting up the names of their sisters killed by police. This March, Manolia Charlotin, a multimedia journalist with the The Media Consortium, and Cat Brooks, artist and organizer with Oakland’s Anti Police-Terror Project sat down at a community event in San Francisco to talk about Say Her Name and what it looks like to build a movement that centers black women. Jamison Robinson, Yuvette Henderson’s brother, talks about the difference it makes when a community comes together to demand justice after the police kill someone.  Featuring: Jamison Robinson, brother of Yuvette Henderson Manolia Charlotin, journalist with The Media Consortium Cat Brooks, artist and organizer with the Anti Police-Terror Project Credits Host: Marie Choi Music: “Railroad’s Whisky Co.” by Jahzzar, “Light, Livid” by Plurabelle, “We Comin’” by Reverend Sekou and the Holy Ghost, “Derailed” by Blue Dot Sessions, Nicolo Scolieri, music selector for the Yuvette Henderson story:  “Unknown Cocek Tune” by Choba, “Tikifite” by Noura Mint Seyma, “Improvisation” by Dave Nelson, “All Our Clocks are Dying” by Ergo Phizmiz Sound Engineers: NaRayan Khalsa, Alexandra Toledo, Clara Lindstrom and Britta Conroy-Randall from The California Institute for Integral Studies’ Public Programs Photo Credits: “Jamison and Yuvette at the BART Station, going to see Disney on Ice.” Photo provided by Jamison Robinson More information Say Her Name, African American Policy Forum Anti-Police Terror Project Black Lives Matter “Making Black Lives Matter” feature by Darwin Bond Graham for the East Bay...

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Mutual Support: We do it Together
Nov18

Mutual Support: We do it Together

We hear about systems of mutual support; where peers coping with similar struggles like HIV, mental health issues and surviving prison step into the roles typically filled by licensed specialists. Mutual support can be controversial, especially when it tries to replace professional help. But it can also be immensely rewarding for all parties involved, and can save a ton of money. This show features a special segment by Making Contact Storytelling Fellow Al Sasser. Find out more about the fellowship here. Featuring: Mamokoena Malaka , Malilamo Mafwa. Elizabeth Mabothile, expert patients Lillian Nalwoga, Constant Kasonga, doctors in Lesotho Cameron Clark, Ozell Johnson,  Darryl Ray Poole, fellow inmates at California State Prison at Solano Louis Wright, corrections officer Dr. Erica Fletcher, documentarian Credits Host: Andrew Stelzer Contributing Producer: Al Sasser Special Thanks: The Omnia foundation for partial funding of this program. Hindenburg-our software sponsor for the Community Storytelling Fellowship. And thanks to everyone  who supported our Community Storytelling Fellows Crowdfunding campaign. More information: All of Us or None Expert Patient Program Cutbacks threaten Lesotho’s HIV sufferers Expert patients in Lesotho change lives Erica Fletcher, PhD Icarus Project Asheville Radical Mental Health Collective Options Recovery Services Project Rebound Root and...

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Resurrected: Formerly Incarcerated Change-Makers
Nov11

Resurrected: Formerly Incarcerated Change-Makers

In order to reduce prison over-crowding the Justice Department is releasing about 6,000 non-violent inmates early. Darris Young is working to make sure upon release individuals can successfully transition after incarceration. On this edition of Making Contact we’ll meet more individuals like Darris who also went to prison, came out and dedicated their lives to making a positive difference. Featuring: Frankie V. Guzman, Attorney at the National Center for Youth Law Frederick Hutson, Founder/CEO Pigeonly Clemmie Greenlee, founder of the Nashville Peacemakers Darris Young, Local Organizer at the Ella Baker Center for Human Rights Credits Host: Laura Flynn Music by: Indian Wells: Alcantara, The Gateless Gate: Endless Grey, Steve Combs: Descent and March, Cousin Silas / Black Hill: Cousin Silas & Black Hill – Sand of the South More information National Center for Youth Law Ella Baker Center Nashville Peace and Justice Center...

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#BlackLivesMatter: Alicia Garza on the Origins of a Movement
Sep15

#BlackLivesMatter: Alicia Garza on the Origins of a Movement

Black Lives Matter. This simple phrase has become the motto of a growing movement calling for true justice and equalty for black people. Alicia Garza, co-founder of Black Lives Matter, first typed out those three words back in 2013. In March of 2015, Alicia Garza visited the University of Southern Maine to tell the story of how Black Lives Matter came to be, and express her hopes for where it’s headed. We hear her speech. Featuring:    Alicia Garza, Black Lives Matter co-founder Cephus Johnson, uncle of Oscar Grant Grace Anderson, protestor Host: Andrew Stelzer Contributing Producers: E.B. Leonard Original Video: Provided by  Maine X Change.   More Information Black Lives Matter http://blacklivesmatter.tumblr.com/ Malcolm X Grassroots Movement National Domestic Workers Alliance Alicia Garza, co-founder of #BlackLivesMatter, speaks at the University of Southern Maine. March 27, 2015. PART 1 PART 2 A Herstory of the #BlackLivesMatter Movement by Alicia Garza Maine X Change Meet the Woman Behind #BlackLivesMatter—The Hashtag That Became a Civil Rights...

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Getting Out: the journey out of prison

Nationally, American prisons release more than 650,000 people into society every year. That’s equivalent to the entire population of Memphis or Boston.  On this edition, producer Aaron Mendelson followed ex-prisoner Kevin Tindall on his journey out of prison. Special thanks to Claire Schoen and the University of California Berkeley, School of Journalism. Featuring:    Gordon Brown, ex-prisoner Monta Kevin Tindall, ex-prisoner Jerry Elster, ex-prisoner Tom Gorham, Program Director Options Recovery Services Barry Krisberg, Director of Research and Policy and Lecturer in Residence at Chief Justice Earl Warren Institute on Law and Social Policy, UC Berkeley Debra Mendoza, former parole officer, consultant More information San Quentin State Prison Pathways To Resilience Impact Hub Oakland How is Life Outside After Being in Prison for Over 20 Years? After prison building a new life means more than just doing...

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