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Conscience and Dissent: Values in Media
Mar29

Conscience and Dissent: Values in Media

  Independent journalism offers incisive analysis and perspectives typically passed over by the corporate-owned media. The phrase “Speaking truth to power” is a central tenet to independent journalism and community produced media. A network of those media outlets gathered at The Media Consortium conference in Washington DC to discuss the role independent media plays in today’s contentious media landscape. Special thanks to the panelists, The Media Consortium, Jo Ellen Kaiser, Manolia Charlotin, and Paul Stewart. Like this program? Please show us the love. Click here and support our non-profit journalism. Thanks! Featuring: Ricardo Sandoval Palos, Managing Editor of 100 Reporters Dr. Amara Enyia, 2016-2018 Global Leadership Fellow with the Global Strategists Association Joseph Torres, Senior External Affairs Director for Free Press Michelle Garcia, Journalist other panelists at this session, not appearing in this radio edition included Sarah van Gelder, co-founder and editor at large of YES!, Katrina vanden Heuvel, Editor and Publisher of The Nation, and Maya Schenwar,Truthout‘s editor-in-chief Credits: Host: R.J. Lozada Producers: Anita Johnson, Marie Choi, Monica Lopez, R.J. Lozada, Andrew Stelzer Executive Director: Lisa Rudman Audience Engagement Director/Web Editor: Sabine Blaizin Development Associate: Vera Tykulsker Music: Ketsa, “Roll On” John Luc Hefferman, “Triumph” More Information: The Media Consortium Journalism That Matters TMC Conference 2017 Plenary 100 Reporters The Media Consortium Conference 2017  ...

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Diversifying Radio with Disabled Voices
Apr04

Diversifying Radio with Disabled Voices

  Radio can be a familiar friend, source of knowledge, a marker of time and place. But as a cultural institution, what constitutes a “good voice” in radio reflects and transmits cultural norms and structures. When I started my Community Storytelling Radio Fellowship at Making Contact, I prepared by reading articles from Transom and AIR media about interviewing, storytelling, and production. I felt more intimidated as I read about advice on ‘how to do radio,’ especially since some parts were very physical (e.g., holding a microphone close to a person for a significant length of time). I wondered, “Where do disabled people like me fit in the radio community? Why don’t articles about diversity in radio ever mention people with disabilities?” Al Letson’s 2015 Transom manifesto explores the the default straight white male voice. It resonated with me immediately and I’d also add that the “default human being” on radio is able-bodied as well. Good Voices/Bad Voices By centering the default “good voice” of radio as one that is able-bodied, one that is pleasant, clear, articulate and devoid of any markers of disability, you erase disabled people, rendering them the Other (or in fancy terms the subaltern). Media and cultural studies scholar Dr. Bill Kirkpatrick wrote about the problematic nature of the invisibility of disabled voices and bodies in radio in a 2013 book chapter, “Voices Made for Print: Crip Voices”: … there is no shortage of self-evident reasons why non-disabled voices thoroughly dominate radio, not least of which is the commercial imperative: broadcasters want listeners to stay tuned, therefore they find speakers and speaking styles that audiences are willing to listen to, with voices that listeners can easily understand and find pleasing to the ear. While undoubtedly sensible as a matter of capitalist logic, however, we need to question the aesthetic reasoning at the root of this supposedly listener-centered approach to speaker selection as well as the idea that “pleasing to the ear” is somehow a sufficient explanation for the absence of disabled voices on the radio. We cannot begin to expand the range of permitted voices on radio without simultaneously undermining the ideologies of ability and disability that disqualify those voices in the first place. In the broader discussion of diversity in media, I see parts of myself included as a disabled woman of color. But more often than not disability is not included because many do not regard it as a culture. For radio, this is total bullshit. If you think about it, disabled voices are the missing instruments in this symphony that is public media. Letson stated in his Transom manifesto: Stories are told that...

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