Please support our programs

radio stories and voices to take action

Jeff Chang on Revolutions in Seeing and Being
Oct11

Jeff Chang on Revolutions in Seeing and Being

“From almost every kind of responsibility and tie from engagement and from faith. So the artist–our task is to move ourselves and the rest of us in the opposite direction. Toward more engagement, towards stronger ethics, toward a social that’s open and inclusive to all toward seeing each other in full, to challenge us to recognize the debts, and yes, the reparations that we owe to each other.” – Jeff Chang Jeff Chang offers ideas to reinforce the importance of art and artists in today’s sociopolitical climate. Chang presented a keynote address for the Art and Race conference, that took place at Oakland Impact Hub earlier this year. Special thanks to Ashara Ekundayo, Christina Orticke, and tech team Zochi and Shah. Like this program? Please show us the love. Click here and support our non-profit journalism. Thanks! TRANSCRIPT –see below Featuring: Jeff Chang, Historian, Author of We Gon’ Be Alright: Notes on Race and Resegregation, Who We Be: The Colorization of America, and other books. Credits: Host: R.J. Lozada Producers: Anita Johnson, Marie Choi, Monica Lopez, R.J. Lozada Executive Director: Lisa Rudman Audience Engagement Director/Web Editor: Sabine Blaizin Development Associate: Vera Tykulsker More Information: Art and Race Conference: A Convergence of Provocation, Strategy, and Beauty Umber Magazine Omi Gallery Oakland Impact Hub Jeff Chang TRANSCRIPT: NARR: I’m R.J. Lozada and this is Making Contact… J. CHANG: We believe in art because we believe in life in all its variations and all of its beauty. We’re here because we also believe that the ugliness, the violence of inhumanity can be transformed. We’re here today because we believe that art and culture change things, that cultural change might even precede, might even make political change To believe in the arts is sometimes… having a kind of a faith, not necessarily a religious faith but very near to it… right…? That sometimes things are just going to be alright. Can’t tell you why… right? Can’t tell you how–it’s going to be all right though ..right? And yet we also know that throughout history, arts and culture have led to revolutions. And so we talk about the ways in which the arts and culture brought about revolutions of seeing and being. We present historian, Jeff Chang and his keynote at the Art and Race Conference at Impact Hub in Oakland that took place earlier this summer… Chang talks about the importance, and value, of creating art that provokes viewers from stasis… …art that speaks to and responds to struggle… to encourage conversations and build empathy, and more importantly, drive communities into action…to create new realities that are inclusive, equitable, and just…. …and now, Jeff Chang....

Read More
Mrs. Hamer Echoes
Oct04

Mrs. Hamer Echoes

Civil rights leader Fannie Lou Hamer, spoke words that are all too relevant today. Mrs. Hamer would have turned 100 years old on October 6th 2017. Today on Making Contact, you’ll hear archival recordings, and excerpts from a powerful new film featuring Fannie Lou Hamer’s contemporaries– themselves now elders. You’ll hear about the context of her life, and the lives of other sharecroppers in Mississippi from a seldom heard film produced for the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee or SNCC. Special thanks for music to our listener, Lisa E. Williams, for lending us her tune “Julia”.  TRANSCRIPT available below –thanks to volunteers! Like this program? Please show us the love. Click here and support our non-profit journalism. Thanks! Featuring: Amzie Moore, SNCC, The Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee Dorie Ladner and Heather Booth, Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee Reverend Leslie McLemore, Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party Sharecroppers Fannie Lou Hamer Credits: Host: Anita Johnson Editing Assistant: Emily Harris Producers: Anita Johnson, Marie Choi, Monica Lopez, R.J. Lozada Executive Director: Lisa Rudman Audience Engagement Director/Web Editor: Sabine Blaizin Development Associate: Vera Tykulsker   Robin Hamilton’s This Little Light of Mine: the Legacy of Fannie Lou Hamer, soon-to-be released film Paul Richards at Estuary Press and the film Dream Deferred and produced by his late father Harvey Richards Claude Marks and Freedom Archives Colin Edwards and his widow Mary Edwards Shawn Dellis at Pacifica Archives Keith McMillan at Jackson State University, Fannie Lou Hamer Institute at COFO Dr. Guha Shankar at the Library of Congress Folklife Center, discussion with Robin Hamilton about her new film Dr. Sade Turnipseed and her Cotton Pickers of America Monument and Interpretive Center Music: Original Music  – Lisa E. Williams Music from Robin Hamilton’s film –  Mathew Prins, Josh Kramer, Fred Capo, Cinquequarti, ArtTune Tech, Pond 5 Music Fannie Lou Hamer – Sweet Honey in the Rock Prelude 1  – Chris Zabriskie Caravan – Blue Dot Session Ergo Phizmiz Cory Gray More Information: Fannie Lou Hamer and see all the sources above TRANSCRIPT Collage of bites with simple ambient music under. I think a man should be impeached when they are not really dealing with the people My soul is tired white folks, of what you have done to us If this society of yours is a Great Society, God knows I would hate to live in a bad one.” applause… We are SICK and TIRED OF BEING SICK AND TIRED. And we are tired of people saying that we’re satisfied because we are everything but satisfied.   I’ve heard lots about “with the people for the people by the people but it’s by a Handful with a handful For an Handful! A House divided cannot stand, a nation divided cannot...

Read More
The Ghosts of the Gwangju Uprising
Sep13

The Ghosts of the Gwangju Uprising

  On May 18, 1980, the people of Gwangju, South Korea came together for reunification and an end to an era of martial law imposed by U.S.-backed military dictators. Over the course of ten days, they staged mass protests, battled riot police and soldiers, and were met with brutal repression. Together, they successfully drove the military out Gwangju and governed the city together. Their actions changed the course of Korean history. On Part 1 of this episode of Making Contact, we hear from survivors of the Gwangju Uprising about how they took on the tasks of history and the lessons they carry. Special thanks to Jung Dong Suk of Gwangju SPARK, Io Sunwoo, Esther Kang, and Hella Organized Bay Area Koreans. Image Credit: Hong Sung-Dam Like this program? Please show us the love. Click here and support our non-profit journalism. Thanks! Featuring: Lee Yoon Jung, President of the May Women’s Association Ahn Sung Rye, Nurse Supervisor at Gwangju Gidok Hospital during the Gwangju Uprising Credits: Host: Marie Choi Producers: Anita Johnson, Marie Choi, Monica Lopez, R.J. Lozada Executive Director: Lisa Rudman Audience Engagement Director/Web Editor: Sabine Blaizin Development Associate: Vera Tykulsker Archival Tape: U.S. Department of Defense Combat Bulletin 101, United Newsreels Japan Surrenders U.S. Soldiers Voiceovers: R.J. Lozada, Josh Klinkenberger and Tavis Kelley Yoon Jung Lee Voiceover: Deann Borshay Liem Ahn Sung Rye Voiceover: Miriam Ching Louie Music: +rain – Jio Im 우리의 소원은 통일 (Our Wish is Reunification) for Piano based on B.W. Ahn – Young Jo Lee What Were We Holding Onto – Jio Im March of the Beloved for News Tapa – Yojo and Ruben July – Jio Im 1983 Song for News Tapa – Sulpa More Information: HOBAK Gwangju Diary: Beyond Death, Beyond the Darkness of Age by Lee Jae Eui  March of The Beloved, Zoom In Korea May 18 Gwangju Peoples Uprising, Korean Resource Center of Los Angeles  A Taxi Driver  Stirrings of Resistance The Legacy of the Gwangju Uprising May 18 Memorial Foundation ...

Read More
The Struggle Inside: The Murder of George Jackson
Aug09

The Struggle Inside: The Murder of George Jackson

On this edition of Making Contact we present, The Struggle Inside: The Murder of George Jackson, a program about the modern anti-prison movement. This year marks the 38th anniversary of Black August, first originated in the California prisons to honor fallen Freedom Fighters, George and Jonathan Jackson, Khatari Gaulden, James McClain, and William Christmas. Jonathan Jackson was gunned down outside the Marin County courthouse on August 7, 1970 as he attempted to take hostages in a plan to negotiate the release of his brother, George. This action liberated three imprisoned Black Liberation Fighters: James McClain, William Christmas and Ruchell Magee. Ruchell Magee still imprisoned, and is the sole survivor of the Marin County Rebellion. Special thanks to Omnia Foundation for supporting Making Contact’s prison issues work and to the Freedom Archives for producing and allowing us to share The Struggle Inside: The Murder of George Jackson. Like this program? Please show us the love. Click here and support our non-profit journalism. Thanks! Featuring: Angela Davis, UC Santa Cruz professor, who supported George & Jonathan Jackson David Hilliard, former Black Panther Party leader Ruchell Magee, prison activist and leader, still in prison for his political activities Georgia Jackson, mother of George and Jonathan Jackson Harry Belafonte, performer and human rights activist James Baldwin, outspoken writer and social activist George and Jonathan Jackson, activist David Johnson, Hugo Pinell, Luis Talamantez and Sundiata Tate, all charged with the San Quentin rebellion following the murder of George Jackson Narrated by Jonathan Jackson, Jr. Credits: Host: Anita Johnson and Jonathan Jackson, Jr. Producers: Anita Johnson, Marie Choi, Monica Lopez, R.J. Lozada Executive Director: Lisa Rudman Audience Engagement Director/Web Editor: Sabine Blaizin Development Associate: Vera Tykulsker More Information: Freedom Archives The Struggle Inside – George Jackson US Prison Culture Soledad Brother: The Prison Letters of George Jackson Blood in My Eye, by George...

Read More
The Draft, Duty, and Dissent: G.I. Resistance to War
Jun27

The Draft, Duty, and Dissent: G.I. Resistance to War

 It was the 1960s ” and throughout the United States, opposition to the War in Vietnam was growing. The Draft forced young men to make a choice about their own participation in the war. And many chose to resist.  Over the course of the war, 2.6 million went to fight in Vietnam. More than 15 million were exempt or disqualified from military service. And over 200,000 officially defied the draft. Today, the US military is made up of those who enlist. What does it take “in the absence of an official draft” to build resistance to war and empire among the very people charged with fighting for it? Special thanks to the Traprock Center for Peace and Justice, Camilo Mejia, and Beth Sanders for allowing us to share it. The speeches were originally recorded and produced by Carly Forbes for Migrant Matters, a Rabble.ca podcast. Like this program? Please show us the love. Click here and support our non-profit journalism. Thanks! Featuring: Draft Resisters: Bruce Cutler, Bruce Dancis, Joseph Gerson, Larry Gossett, Pete Knutson, Mike Rotkin, Phil Stahlman, and Sam Yamashita Camilo Mejia, former Staff Sergeant, Iraq Veterans Against The War *For full access to the film visit The Draft Project. Credits: Host: Marie Choi The Draft and The Vietnam Generation Producer, Video Editor, Director: Beth Sanders Camilo Mejia Speech Recordist and Video Editor: Charles Jenks Producers: Anita Johnson, Marie Choi, Monica Lopez, R.J. Lozada, Andrew Stelzer Executive Director: Lisa Rudman Audience Engagement Director/Web Editor: Sabine Blaizin Development Associate: Vera Tykulsker More Information: The Draft and the Vietnam Generation Iraq Veterans Against the War IVAW Winter Soldier Testimonies on Racism and Dehumanization of the Enemy Camilo Mejia on GI Resistance to the War in Iraq Courage To Resist...

Read More
Dr. Ibram X. Kendi – Stamped from the Beginning: The Definitive History of Racist Ideas in America
Jun21

Dr. Ibram X. Kendi – Stamped from the Beginning: The Definitive History of Racist Ideas in America

Some Americans cling desperately to the myth that we are living in a post-racial society, that the election of the first Black president spelled the doom of racism. In fact, racist thought is alive and well in America – more sophisticated and more insidious than ever. And as award-winning historian Ibram X. Kendi argues in Stamped from the Beginning, if we have any hope of grappling with this stark reality, we must first understand how racist ideas were developed, disseminated, and enshrined in American society. In this deeply researched and fast-moving narrative, Kendi chronicles the entire story of anti-Black racist ideas and their staggering power over the course of American history. Stamped from the Beginning uses the life stories of five major American intellectuals to offer a window into the contentious debates between assimilationists and segregationists and between racists and antiracists. From Puritan minister Cotton Mather to Thomas Jefferson, from fiery abolitionist William Lloyd Garrison to brilliant scholar W.E.B. Du Bois to legendary anti-prison activist Angela Davis, Kendi shows how and why some of our leading proslavery and pro-civil rights thinkers have challenged or helped cement racist ideas in America. Special Thanks to KPFA for use of the audio. Like this program? Please show us the love. Click here and support our non-profit journalism. Thanks! Featuring: Dr. Ibram X. Kendi, Professor of History and International Relations, and the Founding Director of the Anti-Racist Research and Policy Center at American University Credits: Host: Anita Johnson Producers: Anita Johnson, Marie Choi, Monica Lopez, R.J. Lozada, Andrew Stelzer Executive Director: Lisa Rudman Audience Engagement Director/Web Editor: Sabine Blaizin Development Associate: Vera Tykulsker Music: Show opener: Quiet Orchestra – My Friend Show close: Blue Dot Sessions – Grand Caravan More Information: Dr. Ibram Stamped From The Beginning Book...

Read More