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The Far Right and Antifa
Dec12

The Far Right and Antifa

In this episode of Making Contact, we explore the past and present of the far right and anti-fascism. We begin with a story from Athens on the murder and investigation of Greek rapper, Pavlos Fyssas. In the second half of the show, historian and author of Antifa: The Anti-Fascist Handbook, Mark Bray, describes anti-fascist responses to Hitler and Mussolini in the 1920’s and 30’s. Image Credits: Photo by seven_resist on Flickr Image Caption: Pavlos Fyssas, antifascist Rapper and left activist was killed by fascists in Piräus – Athens. 19.09.2013. This photo shows the Red Stuff Antifa store mural in Berlin Kreuzberg. Pavlos was a Hip Hop Artist known as “Killah P”. Like this program? Please show us the love. Click here and support our non-profit journalism. Thanks! Featuring: Magda Fyssas, Mother of Slain Rapper Pavlos Fyssas Kostis Papaioannou, Coordinator of Golden Dawn Watch Meyas, Greek Rapper Mark Bray, Historian and Author of Antifa: The Anti-Fascist Handbook Credits: Host: Monica Lopez Producers: Anita Johnson, Marie Choi, Monica Lopez, R.J. Lozada, Andrew Stelzer Executive Director: Lisa Rudman Audience Engagement Director/Web Editor: Sabine Blaizin Development Associate: Vera Tykulsker Contributing Producers:  Alyssa Moxley, Niki Seth-Smith, Lisa Rudman Song Translation & Voice Over: Yiannis Baboulias Recordings of Golden Dawn Speeches: Stéphane Charpentier Songs: Siga Min Klapso, Lyrics: Killah P, Yannis Angelakas and Taxidiotes Music: Killah P, Yannis Angelakas and Taxidiotes; Zoria, Lyrics: Killah P, Music: Killah P Voice of Magda Fyssas: A translated reenactment of the radio interview of Magda Fyssas by Kostas Arvanitis on Radio 24|7, 88.6 FM, broadcast on June 28, 2017, presented by the Rosa Luxembourg Foundation. Translated by Diane Shugart, spoken by Sophie Williams and Ian Robertson, recorded at Radio 24|7, on September 15, 2017.  Music: Pavlos Fyssas “Steady Leave ID”, Lobo Loco  “West Coast”,  Ryan Little  “Houndstooth”, Gilman Mom  “In Passage”, Blue Dot Sessions More Information: Golden Dawn Watch The Murder of Pavlos Fyssas Killah P – Hliokapsimata [full album] Greek lawyer latest to be assaulted by far right – Al Jazeera, Patrick Strickland Mark Bray An Intimate History of Antifa A Dartmouth Antifa expert was disavowed by his college president for ‘supporting violent protest,’ angering many faculty Southern Poverty Law Center – Hate Map  ...

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Ghosts of the Korean War: Stop THAAD
Dec06

Ghosts of the Korean War: Stop THAAD

On this edition of Making Contact, Part 2 of our Korea series by producer Marie Choi, we head to Soseongri, a small village nestled in the mountains of Seongju County. There, grandmas and grandpas in their 70s, 80s, and 90s have gone from quietly farming to organizing daily protests and blockades to stop THAAD. THAAD is part of a missile defense system that gives the U.S. the ability to carry out a nuclear first strike. The region has historically been Korea’s conservative stronghold, but with the deployment of THAAD, people are re-evaluating the history they’ve been taught their entire lives. Special Thanks to Io Sunwoo, Juyeon Rhee, and Hella Organized Bay Area Koreans. Image Credit: Stop THAAD Alliance Like this program? Please show us the love. Click here and support our non-profit journalism. Thanks! Featuring: Grace Cho, Historian and Author of Haunting the Korean Diaspora: Shame, Secrecy, and the Forgotten War Shin Dong Ok, Head of Soseongri Elders Group Shi Uh Yeon, Gimcheon Resident Gimcheon Residents Soseongri Residents  Credits: Host: Marie Choi Producers: Anita Johnson, Marie Choi, Monica Lopez, R.J. Lozada Executive Director: Lisa Rudman Audience Engagement Director/Web Editor: Sabine Blaizin Development Associate: Vera Tykulsker   Voiceover for Shin Dong Ok: David Jang Jae Rhee Voiceovers for Sosongri Halmonis: Juyeon Rhee, J.T. Takagi Voiceover for Shi Uh Yeon: Juhyun Park Voiceover for Gimcheon Imo: Liz Suk Voiceover for Col. Turner Rogers: Claude Marks Archival Audio: U.S. National Archives, AP Archives, U.S. State Department, and U.S. Army Heritage and Education Center  Music: + Rain – Jio Im and Judy Jun 나그네설움 Instrumental 그래도 – 오재환 고향의 봄 / 도라지 – Judy Jun July – Jio Im 다신 돌아갈 수 없을까요- 이형주 More Information: ZoomIn Korea’s Stop THAAD Coverage Science at MIT: From Cold War to Climate Crisis Task Force to Stop THAAD in Korea MULTIMEDIA: Still Present Pasts Memory of Forgotten War BOOK: Haunting the Korean Diaspora: Shame, Secrecy, and the Forgotten War by Grace Cho...

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I Am Not Your Negro
Nov08

I Am Not Your Negro

Master filmmaker Raoul Peck envisions the book James Baldwin never finished, Remember This House. The result is a radical, up-to-the-minute examination of race in America, using Baldwin’s original words and flood of rich archival material. I Am Not Your Negro is a journey into black history that connects the past of the Civil Rights movement to the present of #BlackLivesMatter. It is a film that questions black representation in Hollywood and beyond. And, ultimately, by confronting the deeper connections between the lives and assassination of Medgar Evers, Malcolm X and Martin Luther King Jr., Baldwin and Peck have produced a work that challenges the very definition of what America stands for. Special thanks to Master filmmaker Raoul Peck, Magnolia Pictures, and Amazon Studios. Like this program? Please show us the love. Click here and support our non-profit journalism. Thanks! Featuring: Film Participants include: James Baldwin, Harry Belafonte, Dick Cavett, Marlon Brando, Robert F. Kennedy, Martin Luther King Jr. Medgar Evers, Malcolm X and many more Credits: Host: Anita Johnson Producers: Anita Johnson, Marie Choi, Monica Lopez, R.J. Lozada, Andrew Stelzer Executive Director: Lisa Rudman Audience Engagement Director/Web Editor: Sabine Blaizin Development Associate: Vera Tykulsker More Information: I Am Not Your Negro Magnolia Pictures Amazon Studios I Am Not Your Negro Youtube James Baldwin: The Last Interview: and other Conversations (The Last Interview Series) Interview with James Baldwin on Sexuality – Richard...

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Jeff Chang on Revolutions in Seeing and Being
Oct11

Jeff Chang on Revolutions in Seeing and Being

“From almost every kind of responsibility and tie from engagement and from faith. So the artist–our task is to move ourselves and the rest of us in the opposite direction. Toward more engagement, towards stronger ethics, toward a social that’s open and inclusive to all toward seeing each other in full, to challenge us to recognize the debts, and yes, the reparations that we owe to each other.” – Jeff Chang Jeff Chang offers ideas to reinforce the importance of art and artists in today’s sociopolitical climate. Chang presented a keynote address for the Art and Race conference, that took place at Oakland Impact Hub earlier this year. Special thanks to Ashara Ekundayo, Christina Orticke, and tech team Zochi and Shah. Like this program? Please show us the love. Click here and support our non-profit journalism. Thanks! TRANSCRIPT –see below Featuring: Jeff Chang, Historian, Author of We Gon’ Be Alright: Notes on Race and Resegregation, Who We Be: The Colorization of America, and other books. Credits: Host: R.J. Lozada Producers: Anita Johnson, Marie Choi, Monica Lopez, R.J. Lozada Executive Director: Lisa Rudman Audience Engagement Director/Web Editor: Sabine Blaizin Development Associate: Vera Tykulsker More Information: Art and Race Conference: A Convergence of Provocation, Strategy, and Beauty Umber Magazine Omi Gallery Oakland Impact Hub Jeff Chang TRANSCRIPT: NARR: I’m R.J. Lozada and this is Making Contact… J. CHANG: We believe in art because we believe in life in all its variations and all of its beauty. We’re here because we also believe that the ugliness, the violence of inhumanity can be transformed. We’re here today because we believe that art and culture change things, that cultural change might even precede, might even make political change To believe in the arts is sometimes… having a kind of a faith, not necessarily a religious faith but very near to it… right…? That sometimes things are just going to be alright. Can’t tell you why… right? Can’t tell you how–it’s going to be all right though ..right? And yet we also know that throughout history, arts and culture have led to revolutions. And so we talk about the ways in which the arts and culture brought about revolutions of seeing and being. We present historian, Jeff Chang and his keynote at the Art and Race Conference at Impact Hub in Oakland that took place earlier this summer… Chang talks about the importance, and value, of creating art that provokes viewers from stasis… …art that speaks to and responds to struggle… to encourage conversations and build empathy, and more importantly, drive communities into action…to create new realities that are inclusive, equitable, and just…. …and now, Jeff Chang....

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Mrs. Hamer Echoes
Oct04

Mrs. Hamer Echoes

Civil rights leader Fannie Lou Hamer, spoke words that are all too relevant today. Mrs. Hamer would have turned 100 years old on October 6th 2017. Today on Making Contact, you’ll hear archival recordings, and excerpts from a powerful new film featuring Fannie Lou Hamer’s contemporaries– themselves now elders. You’ll hear about the context of her life, and the lives of other sharecroppers in Mississippi from a seldom heard film produced for the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee or SNCC. Special thanks for music to our listener, Lisa E. Williams, for lending us her tune “Julia”.  TRANSCRIPT available below –thanks to volunteers! Like this program? Please show us the love. Click here and support our non-profit journalism. Thanks! Featuring: Amzie Moore, SNCC, The Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee Dorie Ladner and Heather Booth, Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee Reverend Leslie McLemore, Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party Sharecroppers Fannie Lou Hamer Credits: Host: Anita Johnson Editing Assistant: Emily Harris Producers: Anita Johnson, Marie Choi, Monica Lopez, R.J. Lozada Executive Director: Lisa Rudman Audience Engagement Director/Web Editor: Sabine Blaizin Development Associate: Vera Tykulsker   Robin Hamilton’s This Little Light of Mine: the Legacy of Fannie Lou Hamer, soon-to-be released film Paul Richards at Estuary Press and the film Dream Deferred and produced by his late father Harvey Richards Claude Marks and Freedom Archives Colin Edwards and his widow Mary Edwards Shawn Dellis at Pacifica Archives Keith McMillan at Jackson State University, Fannie Lou Hamer Institute at COFO Dr. Guha Shankar at the Library of Congress Folklife Center, discussion with Robin Hamilton about her new film Dr. Sade Turnipseed and her Cotton Pickers of America Monument and Interpretive Center Music: Original Music  – Lisa E. Williams Music from Robin Hamilton’s film –  Mathew Prins, Josh Kramer, Fred Capo, Cinquequarti, ArtTune Tech, Pond 5 Music Fannie Lou Hamer – Sweet Honey in the Rock Prelude 1  – Chris Zabriskie Caravan – Blue Dot Session Ergo Phizmiz Cory Gray More Information: Fannie Lou Hamer and see all the sources above TRANSCRIPT Collage of bites with simple ambient music under. I think a man should be impeached when they are not really dealing with the people My soul is tired white folks, of what you have done to us If this society of yours is a Great Society, God knows I would hate to live in a bad one.” applause… We are SICK and TIRED OF BEING SICK AND TIRED. And we are tired of people saying that we’re satisfied because we are everything but satisfied.   I’ve heard lots about “with the people for the people by the people but it’s by a Handful with a handful For an Handful! A House divided cannot stand, a nation divided cannot...

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Language Is Life, Land Is Sacred
Sep27

Language Is Life, Land Is Sacred

Making Contact’s Community Storytelling Fellow Vincent Medina is a Chochenyo Ohlone Native American who is a part of a young generation working to revitalize the Chochenyo language for future generations.  Making Contact’s Community Storytelling Fellow Isabella Zizi is a young native-american environmentalist shaped by the 2012 Chevron Refinery Explosion and by her indigenous women elders in the Refinery Corridor Healing Walks in the Bay Area of California. Like this program? Please show us the love. Click here and support our non-profit journalism. Thanks! TRANSCRIPT –see below Featuring: Vincent Medina, Chochenyo Ohlone, Language and Culture Activist, Making Contact Community Storytelling Fellow Gabriel Medina, Chochenyo Ohlone Dottie Galvan, Chochenyo Ohlone Elder Cathy G., Chochenyo Ohlone Elder Isabella Zizi, Making Contact Community Storytelling Fellow,  Idle No More SF Bay Organizer, Youth Director Earth Guardians Bay Area Alison Ehara Brown, Indigenous Women of the Americas Defending Mother Earth Treaty Signer, Idle No More SF Bay Founder Daniel Adel, California Student Sustainability Coalition Online Communications Coordinator Rich Lohman, Healing Walk Volunteer Patricia St. Onge, Idle No More SF Bay Nafsi Ya Jamii Donovin Keomanee, Healing Walk Monitor/Volunteer Credits: Host: R.J. Lozada Producers: Anita Johnson, Marie Choi, Monica Lopez, R.J. Lozada Executive Director: Lisa Rudman Audience Engagement Director/Web Editor: Sabine Blaizin Development Associate: Vera Tykulsker More Information: Refinery Corridor Healing Walks If we stopped emitting greenhouse gases right now, would we stop climate change? E.P.A. Moves to Rescind Contested Water Pollution Regulation Transcript generated from Pop Up Archive, an automated transcription service, and may contain typographical errors. [RJL] I’m RJ Lozada and this is making contact. [RJL] On today’s episode we bring you a special broadcast and present you two Making Contact storytelling fellows, Vincent Medina, and Isabelle Zizi. Both will bring you powerful experiences, speaking as part of a growing cohort of Native American activists and organizers in the bay area–they’re building upon the  traditions and the work of their elders, for themselves and for the next generations. The Ohlone are the first peoples of the Bay Area, covering areas from the coast line along San Francisco to as far inland as Salinas Valley. After near eradication, the Ohlone were all but completely eradicated and enveloped within the colonizers world — their languages and cultures criminalized and swallowed up. It would be several generations before the Ohlone would be able to regenerate, and reclaim fractions of land rightfully theirs. Making Contact Community Storytelling fellow, Vincent Medina is part of the current generation of Ohlone that are deeply invested in language and cultural revitalization. Whether paying homage at Coyote Hills Park in Fremont, or teaching Chochenyo language courses at Mission San Jose, Vincent finds firm footing in...

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