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Dec12

Click http://ow.ly/NBBu3073Xuo OR return your envelope plz!

Making Contact staff and volunteers working hard on snail mail fundraising. #MakingContact6000 Thanks to listeners like you Making Contact has been able to produce 52weekly shows in 2016: That’s 1500 minutes of programming, broadcasting on 120+ radio stations around the world, working with 30 US & international freelance reporters during 21 years of community and public radio! In honor of our work, please make a generous donation today. Thank you for supporting independent media and stories that matter! 2016 has been a tumultuous year for all of us working for social justice. Making Contact has been in the trenches as we produced radio programs early and often on: Black Lives Matter, Environmental Justice, Women’s Health, Immigrant Rights, Prisoners and LGBT Liberation. Our contribution has been to tell critical stories and celebrate models of collective resistance and progressive movements. Your contribution is to help us get your voices heard in 2017. Please donate today without delay! “Discovering Making Contact has been like finding a shining gem floating in a sea of mediocrity. Your program is superior in many ways–you report in depth with strong journalistic integrity. I have enjoyed listening to dozens of your programs.” – Randy Rambo, Keaau, HI Everyday, your support makes testimonials like Randy’s possible. On #GivingTuesday, we launched our year-end campaign to raise $6,000 by December 31. Thanks to a generous listener supporters that day, we’re already a third of the way towards our goal! In order to get there though, we’ve got to keep the momentum going, and in order to stay on track, we need 100 donations of $10 or more today. We need your help to make that happen. Would you be willing to make a special year-end donation of $10, $25, $50, $100 or whatever you can afford, to help us meet our goal and bring listeners the voices that make progressive change? We simply can’t do it without you. Your support will make a real, lasting impact in telling community stories which is important now more than ever in this era of Trump. Please, click here to make your donation now.   Thank you for your continued support and friendship. With gratitude, Your Making Contact Team: Lisa Rudman, Sabine Blaizin, Anita Johnson, Marie Choi, Monica Lopez, RJ Lozada, Vera Tykulsker and freelance reporters. P.S.  Today, we launch our 2016 Year-End Campaign. Our goal is to raise $6,000. We can only do this with your help. Will you make a gift of $10, $25, $50, $100 or whatever you can afford to help us meet this goal? Click here to make your donation now! DONATE...

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After Disaster: Picking up the pieces in an age of climate change
May04

After Disaster: Picking up the pieces in an age of climate change

Among the effects of climate change are more extreme weather events, such as Typhoon Haiyan, Superstorm Sandy, and a severe drought stretching across much of the Western United States. On this edition of Making Contact we’ll take a deeper look at the social and psychological impacts of climate change, and the weight of inaction. Featuring: Niki Stanley and Derice Klass, Far Rockaway residents Zardos V. Abela, firefighter for the Bureau of Fire Protection in Tacloban, Philippines Abigail Gewirtz,  psychologist at the University of Minnesota Stephan Wasik, Valley Fire survivor Jeff Keenan, Valley Fire survivor Erica Petersen, Valley Fire survivor Manuel Orozco, Behavioral Health Fiscal Manager, Lake County Behavioral Health. Credits Host: Laura Flynn Contributing Producer: Aurora Almendral Thanks: Cloud Mountain Foundation and Park Foundation for support of this program More information Substance Abuse Mental Health Services Administration: Types of Disaster Psychologists for Social Responsibility: Climate change and mental health NJ Spotlight: More Than 25% of Sandy Victims Still Experience Mental-Health Aftereffects NJ Spotlight:  State Tries To Reach People With Post-Sandy Mental Health Issues NJ Spotlight: Sandy Survivors Still Bear Emotional Scars Of Their Ordeal NJ Spotlight: Rebuilding Lives: Helping Sandy Survivors Deal with Depression Monmouth University: NJ Survivor Panel: Survivor Mental...

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After Disaster: Picking up the pieces in an age of climate change
Feb17

After Disaster: Picking up the pieces in an age of climate change

Among the effects of climate change are more extreme weather events, such as Typhoon Haiyan, Superstorm Sandy, and a severe drought stretching across much of the Western United States. On this edition of Making Contact we’ll take a deeper look at the social and psychological impacts of climate change, and the weight of inaction. Featuring: Niki Stanley and Derice Klass, Far Rockaway residents Zardos V. Abela, firefighter for the Bureau of Fire Protection in Tacloban, Philippines Abigail Gewirtz,  psychologist at the University of Minnesota Stephan Wasik, Valley Fire survivor Jeff Keenan, Valley Fire survivor Erica Petersen, Valley Fire survivor Manuel Orozco, Behavioral Health Fiscal Manager, Lake County Behavioral Health. Credits Host: Laura Flyn Contributing Producer: Aurora Almendral Thanks: Cloud Mountain Foundation and Park Foundation for support of this program More information Substance Abuse Mental Health Services Administration: Types of Disaster Psychologists for Social Responsibility: Climate change and mental health NJ Spotlight: More Than 25% of Sandy Victims Still Experience Mental-Health Aftereffects NJ Spotlight:  State Tries To Reach People With Post-Sandy Mental Health Issues NJ Spotlight: Sandy Survivors Still Bear Emotional Scars Of Their Ordeal NJ Spotlight: Rebuilding Lives: Helping Sandy Survivors Deal with Depression Monmouth University: NJ Survivor Panel: Survivor Mental...

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Ivan Rodriguez is fighting the toxic effects of environmental racism in Southeast LA
Jun11

Ivan Rodriguez is fighting the toxic effects of environmental racism in Southeast LA

Southeast Los Angeles is my home, it is also one of the most heavily industrialized areas in Los Angeles, a community about six and a half miles southeast of Downtown Los Angeles.  My Making Contact story is about my experience of institutional environmental racism and the hidden effects it has on my community. The greatest challenge to the area is the large number of toxic polluters, superfund sites, brownfields and freeways. This so called “toxic hot spot” houses a wide range of polluting industries including chrome platers, hazardous waste treatment storage and disposal facilities, and other major toxic emitters. Major projects like the Vernon Power Plant, the proposed expansion of the Long Beach/Pasadena and the highly toxic lead battery smelter, Exide Technologies only add to the dangerous cocktail. Living so close to major polluters creates serious hazards and neighborhood residents have significantly higher rates of pollution related death and health problems including asthma, cancer and low birth rates. This is the reality that my family, some of my closet friends and my community face regularly, in addition to low wages and lack of healthcare and affordable housing. What happens in this heavily industrialized area effect the entire Los Angeles County. But not everyone has a clear understanding of these obstacles and when people are unaware of an issue it’s like it doesn’t exist. Environmental Racism can is a construct of the capitalist, white supremacist world we live in but it surfaces in ways that might not always be the easiest to see, including exclusion of minority groups from public and private boards, commissions, and regulatory bodies. The decisions made and laws passed without our consultation directly effect the people in my community physiologically, socially, economically and obviously environmentally. I believe that with the help of this fellowship I can draw more attention to my community’s fighting against toxic polluters, superfund sites, brownfields and freeways. I hope to learn journalism skills and create change in my community and for the people most...

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BP Five Years Later: Deepwater Horizon and the Cost of Oil

Five years after the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico, not everyone is “back to normal”. On this edition, we follow BP’s trail from the Bayous of Louisiana to the fine art galleries of London. Featuring: Antonia Juhasz, investigative Journalist Monique Verdin & Beau Verdin, Houma tribe members David Gauthe, community organizer Thomas DarDar, United Houma Nation Chief Mark Miller, Southern Utah University History professor Mel Evans, author of Artwash: Big Oil and the Arts  Host: Andrew Stelzer Contributing Producers: Anna Simonton SEGMENTS Houma Tribe Fights for their Existence 5 Years After BP Reporter Anna Simonton takes us down to Southern Louisiana, where the Houma people have been battling BP–and the entire oil industry–for decades, as they struggle to maintain their community’s very existence. Antonia Juhasz on BP and the Gulf, 5 years After Deepwater Horizon We speak with author, analyst, and oil industry expert Antonia Juhasz. She’s been following BP since even before the Deepwater Horizon spill, going back to her 2008 book, “The Tyranny of Oil: The World’s Most Powerful Industry and What We Must Do to Stop It.” Keeping Big Oil out of Big Art We go to BP’s corporate hometown, London England. For the past decade, going back even before the gulf coast spill, a coalition of artists has been subverting the oil giant’s efforts to greenwash its reputation through sponsorship of the art world, and specifically, the Tate, one of the most highly regarded art-institutions in the world. More information: Liberate Tate Artwash: Big Oil and the Arts by Mel Evans Oil and the Arts Antonia Juhasz United Houma Nation My Louisiana Love BP Global-Gulf of Mexico Restoration You & I Films 10 Reasons Why BP Got Off and Offshore Oil Drilling Just Got More Dangerous The politics of energy: Oil and gas The Great Invisible (movie trailer) Pretty Slick  (movie trailer) The Dilbit...

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Heat of the Moment: Sea Level Rise

Climate change is here affecting weather conditions and sea levels. In India it’s also having a more surprising influence on the country’s tigers. On this edition of Making Contact, reporter Daniel Grossman takes us to India in Heat of the Moment: Sea Level Rise. Heat of the Moment was originally produced for the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting and WBUR. Featuring: Pranabes Sanyal, former park director for the Sunderbans Tiger Reserve Amit Mallick, Sundarbans resident and man attacked by tiger Tushar Kanjilal, secretary of the Tagore Society for Rural Development Mohammed Sheikh Gafur, Sundarbans resident and tea shop owner Sugata Hazra, an oceanographer at Calcutta’s Jadavapur University Ainun Nishat representative to the International Union for Conservation of Nature Shafiqul Islam, director of a small college and founder of the Pani Committee Sheikh Nural Ala, chief engineer for this region of the Water Development Board Atiq Rahman, director of the Bangladesh Center for Advanced Studies Daniel Grossman, journalist. Credits: Host: Jasmin Lopez Producer: Daniel Grossman More Information Deep Water book video Fantastic Forests: The Balance Between Nature & People of Madagascar Antarctica Special Meltdown Inside Out Noah’s Raft: Saving Madagascar’s Wildlife Without the Ark, Radio Netherlands and Living on...

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