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Fallen Heroes of 2016
Dec26

Fallen Heroes of 2016

Thousands of local social justice organizers passed away this year. People doing crucial work in their communities, whose deaths didn’t make the headlines.  On this edition of Making Contact, we’ll hear about some of the fallen heroes of 2016. Like this program? Please show us. Click here and support our non-profit journalism. Thanks! Can you recognize the title & Fallen Artist of each song in this show?  We’ll list their names and songs in our newsletter.  Don’t miss the answers in January — Sign Up Here. Featuring: Joani Blank, Founder of Good Vibrations Carol Queen, Sexologist Darren Seals, Ferguson Activist Ebony Williams, Chosen Diamonds Mentor Berta Caceres, Co-Founder of the Council of Popular & Indigenous Organizations of Honduras (COPINH) Silvio Carillo, Journalist and Nephew of Berta Caceres Cedric Robinson, UC Santa Barbara Professor and Author of Black Marxism: The Making of the Black Radical Tradition Robin Kelley, UCLA Black Studies and History Professor Tom Rainey-Smith, Amnesty International Korea Coordinator, speaking about Baek Nam-gi activist farmer in South Korea Luis de la Garza, Member of La Colectiva Horacio N. Roque Ramirez, Queer Latin@ Oral Historian and with a postsctript, Ben Bagdikian, Washington Post Editor who helped publish The Pentagon Papers and was dean of the Graduate School of Journalism at the University of California, Berkeley from ’85-’88. He was perhaps best known as the author of “The Media Monopoly” (1983), which warned that freedom of expression and independent journalism were threatened by the consolidation of news and entertainment outlets in a shrinking circle of corporate owners. Credits: Host: Andrew Stelzer Producers: Anita Johnson, Marie Choi, Monica Lopez, R.J. Lozada, Andrew Stelzer Executive Director: Lisa Rudman Audience Engagement Director/Web Editor: Sabine Blaizin Development Associate: Vera Tykulsker   More Information: Council of Popular & Indigenous Organizations of Honduras Cedric J. Robinson: the Making of a Black Radical Intellectual Horacio N. Roque Ramírez: Presente! Robin D. G. Kelley Joani Blank Good Vibrations Carol Queen Justice for Berta Silvio Carrillo The Malleable Memory of Darren Seals Who killed Ferguson activist Darren Seals? Who Killed Darren Seals and Why Farmer Baek Nam-gi Dies in South Korea After South Korean farmer’s death, family continues fight for justice Berta Cáceres, Honduran human rights and environment activist, murdered Black Marxism: The Making of the Black Radical Tradition In Memoriam: Horacio N. Roque Ramirez Radical Thought: Cedric J. Robinson Korean farmer Baek Nam Gi-Korean critically injured by police water cannons How Muhammad Ali influenced the Civil Rights Movement The Media Monopoly 6th Edition by Ben H. Bagdikian Goldman Prize Recipient Berta Cáceres...

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The Electoral College’s Dirty History
Nov16

The Electoral College’s Dirty History

  Given the Trump Election and the difference between popular votes and Electoral votes, we explore the Electoral College. Who are the electors, anyway? And will the United States ever join the rest of the world, and adopt a popular vote for president? Yale University Law & Political Science Professor Akhil Reed Amar says the Electoral College discourages voting, lessens the power of the states, and could work to the disadvantage of either major political party. On this edition of Making Contact, Akhil Reed Amar speaks with Angela McKenzie of Initiative Radio about how the US constitution can be changed to create a more fair and just society.  ** SEE BONUS ARTICLE BELOW Like this program? Please show us the love. Click here and support our non-profit journalism. Thanks! Featuring: Akhil Reed Amar, Yale University Sterling Law and Political Science Professor Angela McKenzie, Initiative Radio Host Credits: Guest Producer:  Angela McKenzie, Initiative Radio MC Producer: Andrew Stelzer Remixers: Nicolo Scolieri and Monica Lopez Producers: Anita Johnson, Marie Choi, Monica Lopez, R.J. Lozada Executive Director: Lisa Rudman Web Editor: Kwan Booth, Sabine Blaizin The Troubling Reason the Electoral College Exists  by Akhil Reed Amar @Time.com The Founding Fathers had something particular in mind when they set up the U.S. presidential election system: slavery As Americans await the quadrennial running of the presidential obstacle course now known as the Electoral College, it’s worth remembering why we have this odd political contraption in the first place. After all, state governors in all 50 states are elected by popular vote; why not do the same for the governor of all states, a.k.a. the president? The quirks of the Electoral College system were exposed this week when Donald Trump secured the presidency with an Electoral College majority, even as Hillary Clinton took a narrow lead in the popular vote. Some claim that the founding fathers chose the Electoral College over direct election in order to balance the interests of high-population and low-population states. But the deepest political divisions in America have always run not between big and small states, but between the north and the south, and between the coasts and the interior. One Founding-era argument for the Electoral College stemmed from the fact that ordinary Americans across a vast continent would lack sufficient information to choose directly and intelligently among leading presidential candidates. This objection rang true in the 1780s, when life was far more local. But the early emergence of national presidential parties rendered the objection obsolete by linking presidential candidates to slates of local candidates and national platforms, which explained to voters who stood for what. Although the Philadelphia framers did not anticipate the rise of...

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Rosa Brooks on How Everything Became War and the Military Became Everything
Sep14

Rosa Brooks on How Everything Became War and the Military Became Everything

The US military didn’t shrink much under President Obama, and our perpetual state of war has barely waned since 9-11. Author Rosa Brooks says the consequences of this ‘new normal’ reach deep into our society; far beyond the body count of those killed overseas. On this edition, Rosa Brooks speaks about her new book, How Everything Became War and the Military Became Everything. Special thanks to Politics and Prose Bookstore in Washington DC Featuring Rosa Brooks, author of How Everything Became War and the Military Became Everything. Host: Andrew Stelzer More information Rosa Brooks Politics and Prose How Everything Became War and the Military Became Everything by Rosa Brooks Rosa Brooks speaking at Politics and Prose Military Spending in the United States Costs of War And The Record for Highest Constant $ Military Spending Since 1950 Goes To………The Peace Candidate, Barrack...

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Bipolarized: Rethinking Mental Illness
Jul20

Bipolarized: Rethinking Mental Illness

Ross McKenzie was diagnosed with bipolar disorder, but after 15 years on Lithium, he wasn’t getting any better. He decided to take matters into his own hands, get off the drug, and find out why so many people are being told they have mental illnesses. This week on Making Contact, we bring you an abridged version of the film Bipolarized; Rethinking Mental Illness, chronicling McKenzie’s journey. Featuring: Ross McKenzie, diagnosed with Bipolar disorder Ross McKenzie’s mother and sister Gwen Olsen, former pharmaceutical rep Laura Delano, psychiatry survivor Robert Whitaker, author of Anatomy of an Epidemic: Magic Bullets, Psychiatric Drugs, and the Astonishing Rise of Mental Illness in America Dr. Charles Whitfield, trauma recovery specialist Dr. Peter Levine, founder of Somatic Experiencing Credits Host: Andrew Stelzer Special thanks: Specialty Studios More information http://www.bipolarizedthemovie.com/ Gwen Olsen, the Rx Reformer Laura Delano Mad in America Anatomy of an Epidemic: Magic Bullets, Psychiatric Drugs, and the Astonishing Rise of Mental Illness in America American Psychiatric Association DSM-5 Dr. Charles Whitfield Peter Levine-Somatic...

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Jane Mayer on the Hidden Billionaires of the Radical Right
Jun22

Jane Mayer on the Hidden Billionaires of the Radical Right

Who is Charles Koch–really? Who are the members of “the Network”?—a semi-secret group assembled by the Koch brothers? How are the superrich’s priorities transforming American society? Journalist Jane Mayer spent several years searching for some of those answers, and her new book is titled Dark Money, the Hidden History of the Billionaires. Mayer is interviewed by Atlantic magazine editor-in-chief James Bennet.  Featuring: Jane Mayer, author of Dark Money, the Hidden History of the Billionaires James Bennet, Atlantic Magazine editor-in-chief Credits Host: Andrew Stelzer Special thanks: Politics and Prose Bookstore & Coffeehouse More information   Dark Money: The Hidden History of the Billionaires Behind the Rise of the Radical Right Jane Mayer on Dark Money Politics and Prose Bookstore & Coffeehouse How the Kochtopus Went After a Reporter Koch Industries Americans for...

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Unstoppable: The Fight for 15
Mar23

Unstoppable: The Fight for 15

In 2012, fast food workers in NYC kicked off a movement that has exceeded all expectations, and changed the conversation about the minimum wage. On this edition, low paid workers tell the story of the fight for 15, the exploding nationwide movement for fair wages. Featuring: Alvin Major, KFC employee and original NYC striker Richard Wilson, Walmart employee Bernardo Monteo, Chanda Roberts, Jayla Mosley; fast food workers Mary Kay Henry, SEIU President Ken Jacobs, chair of the UC Berkeley Center for Labor Research and Education Thomas Geoghegan, author of “Only One Thing Can Save Us: Why America Needs A New Kind of Labor Movement“ More information Fight for 15 Fast Food Forward Clocking In Only One Thing Can Save Us: Why America Needs A New Kind of Labor Movement“ by Thomas Geoghegan States Move to Roll Back City Minimum-Wage Raises Living Wage Mandate Preemption Act Summer For Respect on Soundcloud Voices of Walmart California’s $15 Minimum Wage Initiative Is Likely Headed to Voters Columbia University Interdisciplinary Center for Innovative Theory and Empirics (INCITE) 14 Cities States Approved 15 Minimum Wage in 2015 How New York’s “Fight for $15” Launched a National Movement  The Care Gap Income Inequality Is A Health Hazard Why Skills Are Not Enough to Land a Job Last word: the Faces of...

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