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Thwarting Democracy, the Battle for Voting Rights
Oct19

Thwarting Democracy, the Battle for Voting Rights

Since the 2013 Supreme Court ruling on the Voting Rights Act, many states have pushed changes to voter laws that raise disturbing connections to the past. Before the anniversary of the Voting Rights Act on August 6th, we revisit the hard fought battles for voting rights and the implications of new laws. Featuring: Reverend Tyrone Edwards, civil rights historian in Plaquemines Parish Louisiana Tyrone Brooks, Georgia State Representative Clifford Kuhn, Professor of History at Georgia State University JT Johnson, civil rights organizer Allen Secher, rabbi Jerel James, Tamia Adkinson, docents at Civil Rights Museum of St. Augustine August Tinson, testified in U.S. vs Fox (1962) Gary May, professor of history at the University of Delaware and the author of Bending Towards Justice: The Voting Rights Act and the Transformation of American Democracy. Lead Producer: Laura Flynn Contributing Producers: Andrew Stelzer, Jasmin Lopez, Anna Simonton and Dina Weinstein Music: “Ain’t Scared of Your Jails,” sung at civil rights march in Washington, D.C. August 1963, “Spring, Summer, Fall, Winter…and Spring” by Newton Balloon, “vaya” by andrés elstein, “Equal Soul” by Trans Atlantic Rage / Balogh For More information: Bending Toward Justice: The Voting Rights Act and the Transformation of American Democracy By Gary May Civil Rights Library of St. Augustine Civil Rights Museum of St. Augustine The Formula Behind the Voting Rights Act New York Times Southern Poverty Law Center Department of Justice NY Times: Tracking changes of voting law changes ProPublica Civil Rights timeline ACLU Voting Rights Act timeline Movement Music Freedom Songs: Selma, Alabama Lyrics of the Freedom Songs Articles, reports, etc. Court Decisions on Voting Rules Sow Confusion in state Races New York Times Issues Related to State Voter Identification Laws U.S. Government Accountability Office United States v. Fox, 211 F. Supp. 25 (E.D. La. 1962) District Court, E.D. Louisiana FBI Re-Examines 1946 Lynching Case Remembering A Civil Rights Swim-In: It was A Milestone’ Lyndon B. Johnson speech Before Congress on Voting Rights (March 15,...

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Invisible Workers, Laboring in the Shadows
Aug31

Invisible Workers, Laboring in the Shadows

* This program won the award  for Explanatory Journalism in radio/audio from the Society of Professional Journalists, Norther California Chapter in Nov. 2016. Congrats to all !  Please add your congratulations here. Millions of people around the world work in jobs that aren’t formally recognized or afforded legal protections typical of wage earning jobs. They’re often not even thought of as legitimate work. On this edition of Making Contact, we’re going to meet people making work where there is no work for them. From recyclers, to border couriers, to waste pickers, we’re exploring the informal labor sector and what some are doing to gain greater recognition, protections, and rights. Featuring Landon Goodwin, recycler and pastor and also featured in documentary Dogtown Redemption Aicha al Azzouzi border courier Salma al Azzouzi, Aicha’s oldest daughter Charles Gachanga Gichonge, creator of the Mustard Seed Courtyard clean-up campaign Antony Makau, Dandora resident Richard Munene, Dandora restaurant owner Sally Roever, Urban Policy Director for Women in Informal Employment Globalizing and Organizing (WIEGO) Malati Gadgil, KKPKP Credits Host: Laura Flynn Contributing Producers: Thalia Beaty, Maggy Donaldson, and Beenish Ahmed Featured Music: Blue Dot Sessions: Lesser Gods of Metal, Tyrano Theme, and Pavement Hack, Tours: Enthusiast, Salomé Lego Playset: La Lutte, Comme Experience Intérieure, Janneh: Humajataritee Photo Credits: Thalia Beaty and Maggy Donaldson Show segments An Unusual but Legal Trade: the “Mule Women” of Morocco This slideshow requires JavaScript. We head to the Spanish enclave Ceuta bordering Morocco. The border is a gateway for a brisk trade. Moroccan markets sell goods imported from Spain at a discount for buyers. But that discount comes at a price — for the Moroccan women who bring those goods across the border…on their backs. Co-reported with Maggy Donaldson, Thalia Beaty brings us this story. From dump site to Mustard Seed Courtyards There’s a neighborhood in Nairobi, Kenya that doubles as the city’s main garbage dump. More than 900 tons of trash are piled into Dandora every day. It was declared full more than a decade ago, but the trucks kept coming — dropping everything from household scraps to medical waste. The waste has polluted the water, soil, and air according to the report, Trash and Tragedy by Concern Worldwide. And it has compromised the health of more than 200,000 people. Often the trucks also dump garbage into the surrounding courtyards of residents. While an estimated 10,000 people earn money by mining the trash for recyclables, even those who work at the dump don’t want to live in a dump. Reporter Beenish Ahmed has the story of a community-driven clean-up effort in Dandora. More information: Dogtown Redemption Concern Worldwide: Trash and Tragedy, the impact of garbage on human rights in Nairobi City Women in Informal Employment: Globalizing...

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Coffee: Trouble Brewing?
Aug24

Coffee: Trouble Brewing?

It’s the second most-traded commodity in the world after oil but how much do you think about your cup of coffee? From coffee farmers in Colombia to the trash produced by your single-cup coffee machine, Making Contact and Green Grid Radio team up to count the costs of your morning cup o’joe. Featuring: Jairo Martinez, Mariana Cruz, Suzana Angarita, coffee farmers Jeff Goldman, former executive director Fairtrade Resource Network Jeff Chean, Principal and Chief Coffee Guy Groundworks Roasters John Hazen, single-cup coffee machine owner Rebecca Jewell, recycling program manager for Davis Street Transfer Station Credits Hosts: George Lavender and Mallory Smith Contributing Producers: Laura Flynn, Jennifer Dunn, Mallory Smith Music: Pensacola Twilight: Lee Rosevere Cafetero: Christian Martinez Grand Caravan: Blue Dot Sessions Them Never Love No Bans: Hot Fire  La Boite A Sons – Contest Contributions: Various Artists Or listen to separate segments: From Bean To Cup Over 500,000 Colombian families depend on coffee farming to survive. But 5 decades of war between left-wing guerrillas and right-wing paramilitaries forced millions of Colombians to flee their land and abandon their crops. In recent years the violence has decreased and many farmers have returned to their land, but getting back to farming hasn’t been easy. Jennifer Dunn reports on how Colombia’s small-scale coffee farmers are struggling to protect their crops and their way of life. Fairtrade v Fairtrade Fairtrade is Fairtrade right? Wrong. As Mallory Smith of Green Grid Radio found out, in 2012 the Fairtrade movement suffered an ugly breakup that resulted in two different organizations, both claiming the Fairtrade label, but with different visions of what it stood for… Kill the K-Cup? Single-cup brewing is wildly popular- partly because it’s marketed as being so easy- you simply pop the pod in the machine and you have a cup of coffee. But it’s what happens to that little pod after you’re done making coffee that’s causing concern. Making Contact producer Laura Flynn decided to find out what happens next.. < p id=”E74″ class=”qowt-stl-BodyText”> More information: Green Grid Radio Fair trade lite: Fair Trade USA moves away from worker co-ops Hijacked Organic, Limited Local, Faulty Fair Trade Groundwork Coffee Roundup on the Fair Trade USA/FLO Split FWP’s Statement on Fair Trade USA s Resignation from Fairtrade International (FLO) A Schism Over Fair Trade A Brewing Problem Your Coffee Pods Dirty Secret How to Become a Citizen Eater: A Trip Behind the Labels of Your Ethical Cup of Coffee Kill the K-Cup...

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After Disaster: Picking up the pieces in an age of climate change
May04

After Disaster: Picking up the pieces in an age of climate change

Among the effects of climate change are more extreme weather events, such as Typhoon Haiyan, Superstorm Sandy, and a severe drought stretching across much of the Western United States. On this edition of Making Contact we’ll take a deeper look at the social and psychological impacts of climate change, and the weight of inaction. Featuring: Niki Stanley and Derice Klass, Far Rockaway residents Zardos V. Abela, firefighter for the Bureau of Fire Protection in Tacloban, Philippines Abigail Gewirtz,  psychologist at the University of Minnesota Stephan Wasik, Valley Fire survivor Jeff Keenan, Valley Fire survivor Erica Petersen, Valley Fire survivor Manuel Orozco, Behavioral Health Fiscal Manager, Lake County Behavioral Health. Credits Host: Laura Flynn Contributing Producer: Aurora Almendral Thanks: Cloud Mountain Foundation and Park Foundation for support of this program More information Substance Abuse Mental Health Services Administration: Types of Disaster Psychologists for Social Responsibility: Climate change and mental health NJ Spotlight: More Than 25% of Sandy Victims Still Experience Mental-Health Aftereffects NJ Spotlight:  State Tries To Reach People With Post-Sandy Mental Health Issues NJ Spotlight: Sandy Survivors Still Bear Emotional Scars Of Their Ordeal NJ Spotlight: Rebuilding Lives: Helping Sandy Survivors Deal with Depression Monmouth University: NJ Survivor Panel: Survivor Mental...

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Misrepresented: Interrupting Muslim & Arab Stereotypes
Apr27

Misrepresented: Interrupting Muslim & Arab Stereotypes

Hollywood has had a long history of whitewashing and stereotyping different groups –from brownface to blackface and yellowface. For Arabs and Muslims, persistent clichés throughout Hollywood’s history range from desert scenes with camels and palm trees, and characters cast as barbaric villains, belly dancers, or terrorists among others. On this edition of Making Contact we’ll meet people confronting racist depictions of Muslims and Arabs in pop culture and politics; and two young women evaluating societal expectations placed on them. Featuring: Diana Kalaji, student at University of San Francisco Moustafa Bayoumi, author of “This Muslim American Life, Dispatches from the War on Terror.” Credits Host: Laura Flynn Contributing Producer: Diana Kalaji Associate Producer: Marie Choi Photo Credit: “Community March Against Islamophobia December 13, 2015”, Misha Voloaca Music Credit: BOPD, aint no thing, Vir Noctruna, Stop + Go More information: Moustafa Bayoumi: “This Muslim American Life, Dispatches from the War on...

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From Dreamers in Arizona to Muslims in Michigan: Immigrant Communities Upholding Democracy
Apr20

From Dreamers in Arizona to Muslims in Michigan: Immigrant Communities Upholding Democracy

  This edition of Making Contact is Part I of our special series examining how immigrants are responding and participating in elections and politics today. From Dreamers in Arizona to Muslims in Michigan, we’ll meet immigrant communities upholding democracy. We’ll also have a conversation with the Brennan Center for Justice President and author of the Fight to Vote, Michael Waldman about how immigrants throughout history have expanded the right to vote. Featuring Elizabeth Perez, “Ellie” council assistant to the Office of Vice Mayor and councilwoman Kate Gallego Kate Gallego, City of Phoenix Vice Mayor Anthony Valdovinos, founder of La Machine Viridiana Hernández, founding member of Team Awesome Dr. Muzammil Ahmed, member of Community of Western Suburbs Mosque Saber Ahmed, member of Community of Western Suburbs Mosque Dr. Syed Taj, former Canton, Michigan City Council member Michael Waldman, Brennan Center for Justice President and author of the “Fight to Vote.” Credits Host: Laura Flynn Associate Producer: Marie Choi Contributing Producers: Valeria Fernández and Renee Gross Project Coordinator: Manolia Charlotin Photo Credits: Valeria Fernández and Renee Gross Music Credit: Ketsa, What tomorrow brings, Arbee, ambidextre, Ketsa, Where the river run Special thanks: Beacon journalism crowdfunding platform and all the individuals who contributed to our campaign for our Immigrants and Elections miniseries. Thanks also to the Berwick-Degel Family foundation. More information Making Contact: Immigration and Election Series La Machine Team Awesome, Arizona The Young Turks: Islamaphobic Ads Against Michigan Candidate Syed Taj The Brennan Center for Justice: Voting Rights & Elections 2016 The Nation: Ari Berman, elections coverage Segments Vote-less, not voiceless: Dreamers reshape Arizona politics Civil disobedience helped Dreamers inject new blood into the immigration reform movement in the U.S. It resulted in the creation of DACA or deferred action in 2012. It grants undocumented immigrants who entered the country before their 16th birthday protection from deportation and the ability to receive a work-permit. This election cycle Dreamers are working for presidential candidates and in one city, Dreamers are pushing the envelop again, but from outside the spotlight. From civil disobedience to civic accountability, youth that can’t vote are making the voice of the Latino community heard in local politics and at the ballot box. Valeria Fernández has the story in Phoenix, Arizona. A Michigan Mosque, mobilizing civic engagement Religion can play a big role in politics. Many religious intuitions work to mobilize their members to vote. Politicians, like Ted Cruz, have used churches as places to announce their campaigns. But for a while, members of the Muslim Community of Western Suburbs in Canton, Michigan were unsure about what role their mosque should play in politics. Now that’s changing. As anti-Muslim rhetoric has increased, members of the mosque...

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Caring Relationships: Negotiating Meaning and Maintaining Dignity
Apr13

Caring Relationships: Negotiating Meaning and Maintaining Dignity

The vast majority of care recipients are exclusively receiving unpaid care from a family member, friend, or neighbor. The rest receive a combination of family care and paid assistance, or exclusively paid formal care. Whether you’re a paid home care provider, or rely on personal assistance to meet your daily needs, or a family member caring for a loved one, the nature of the working relationship depends on mutual respect and dignity. On this edition of Making Contact, which features a segment by our Community Storytelling Fellow Alice Wong, we’ll explore the dynamic and complex relationship of care receiving and giving. (Alice’s story transcript below) Featuring: Camille Christian, home care provider and SEIU member Brenda Jackson, home care provider and SEIU member Patty Berne, co-founder and director, Sins Invalid Jessica Lehman, executive director, San Francisco Senior and Disability Action Kenzi Robi, president, San Francisco IHSS (In Home Supportive Services) Public Authority Governing Body Rachel Stewart, queer disabled woman passionate about disability and employment issues Alana Theriault, disability benefits counselor in Berkeley, California Ingrid Tischer, director of development, Disability Rights Education & Defense Fund (DREDF) Alta Mae Stevens, in-home caregiver Credits Host: Laura Flynn Contributing Producers: Alice Wong and Stephanie Guyer-Stevens Photo Credits: Alice Wong, Stephanie Guyer-Stevens Music Credit: Dexter Britain: The Time To Run (Finale), Gillicuddy: Adventure, Darling, Steve Combs: March, Jason Shaw: Running Waters, Jared C. Balogh: BRICK BY BRICK DAY BY DAY, Jared C. Balogh: INCREMENTS TOWARDS SERENITY, Nheap: Crossings, Cherly KaCherly: The Hungry Garden, Trio Metrik: Vogelperspektive, Kevin MacLeod: Faster Does It Segments excerpted from full show above Choreography of Care Making Contact’s Community Storytelling Fellow, Alice Wong asks, how do people with disabilities who rely on personal assistance negotiate their relationships with the people that assist them? And how does that inform their sense of independence or interdependence with others? In this next story from the San Francisco Bay Area of California, Wong searches for answers. (see Alice’s story transcript below) A Lifetime of Caregiving: Mom and Uncle Harold Most often family members are the ones that step up and provide care when a parent or loved one needs it. According to the Family Caregiver Alliance, 78 percent of care beneficiaries receive assistance from a family member, friend, or neighbor. Alta Mae Stevens is 87 years old. From the moment she married she’s been caring for one person or another. Her daughter Stephanie Guyer-Stevens talks to her about what a lifetime of caregiving has meant to her. Resources: UCSF: UCSF Study Projects Need for 2.5M More Long-Term Care Workers by 2030 SEIU: Longterm Care Workers Disability Rights Education & Defense Fund Disability Visibility Project Hand in Hand: The Domestic Employers Network National Disability Leadership Alliance Senior and...

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After Disaster: Picking up the pieces in an age of climate change
Feb17

After Disaster: Picking up the pieces in an age of climate change

Among the effects of climate change are more extreme weather events, such as Typhoon Haiyan, Superstorm Sandy, and a severe drought stretching across much of the Western United States. On this edition of Making Contact we’ll take a deeper look at the social and psychological impacts of climate change, and the weight of inaction. Featuring: Niki Stanley and Derice Klass, Far Rockaway residents Zardos V. Abela, firefighter for the Bureau of Fire Protection in Tacloban, Philippines Abigail Gewirtz,  psychologist at the University of Minnesota Stephan Wasik, Valley Fire survivor Jeff Keenan, Valley Fire survivor Erica Petersen, Valley Fire survivor Manuel Orozco, Behavioral Health Fiscal Manager, Lake County Behavioral Health. Credits Host: Laura Flyn Contributing Producer: Aurora Almendral Thanks: Cloud Mountain Foundation and Park Foundation for support of this program More information Substance Abuse Mental Health Services Administration: Types of Disaster Psychologists for Social Responsibility: Climate change and mental health NJ Spotlight: More Than 25% of Sandy Victims Still Experience Mental-Health Aftereffects NJ Spotlight:  State Tries To Reach People With Post-Sandy Mental Health Issues NJ Spotlight: Sandy Survivors Still Bear Emotional Scars Of Their Ordeal NJ Spotlight: Rebuilding Lives: Helping Sandy Survivors Deal with Depression Monmouth University: NJ Survivor Panel: Survivor Mental...

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Failing Our Youth: An Inadequate Foster Care System
Feb03

Failing Our Youth: An Inadequate Foster Care System

This show takes a look at issues within the foster care system in the U.S. from the high rate of teen pregnancy to the alarming use of psychiatric medications in California’s foster care system. Featuring: Nicole Rocke, former foster youth Kyle Lafferty, the National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy Linda Bryant, Clinical Professor at New York University’s School of Social Work Benita Miller, Deputy Commissioner of Family Permanency Services at the Administration of Children’s Services Lorraine Jacobs, caseworker Yolanda Vasquez, former foster youth Adriane Fugh-Berman, Pharmacology Professor at Georgetown University’s Medical Center Bill Grimm, Attorney at National Center for Youth Law Susan Bullard David Arrendondo, Child psychiatrist Dr. Edmund Levin, at the Lincoln Child Center Nancy Forster, Therapist at the Lincoln Child Center April Rene Sanders, former foster youth and recipient of AB12 Kyle Sporleader, Statewide Legislative Coordinator for California Youth Connection (CYC) Credits: Host: Jasmin Lopez Contributing Producer: Leticia Miranda, Bay Area News Group Special thanks to the Bay Area News Group. Music: Quiet Orchestra, My Friend Jahzzar, Siesta Jahzzar, The Flowers Are Still Standing Poor Alexei, The Long Goodbye Cory Gray, Build a View Show Segments Teen Pregnancy and Foster Care Foster girls are 2.5 times more likely to become pregnant by the time they’re 19 than their peers outside of foster care. Some researchers estimate that about half the girls in foster care become pregnant in their teens. At the same time, foster care systems across the country do not have the proper resources and support systems for young women in care to learn about reproductive health and then birth and raise children. This is a story about Nicole Rocke who became pregnant at 16 in her first year living in a Brooklyn foster home. From Foster Care to College Typically turning 18 has also meant aging out of the system. So no more reimbursements to subsidize care. Studies show foster youth lacking financial support face higher rates of homelessness and incarceration; and fewer finish high school or go to college. To help ease the transition into adulthood, in 2008 the federal government allowed states to claim reimbursements for the cost of foster care to the age of 21. California’s version helped one young woman gain control of her life. Making Contact’s Laura Flynn has the story More Information Drugging Our Kids – Full documentary: http://webspecial.mercurynews.com/druggedkids/ California Youth Connection Chapin Hill at the University of Chicago: Midwest Evaluation of the Adult Functioning of Former Foster Youth Chapin Hill at the University of Chicago: Findings from the California Youth Transitions to Adulthood Study (CalYOUTH) National Conference of State Legislatures: Extending Foster Care Beyond 18 California Fostering Connections to Success: Resource page...

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Call for Pitches: Immigration and Elections
Jan27

Call for Pitches: Immigration and Elections

We want your pitches! Making Contact is assembling a team of freelance journalists to  examine how immigrants in the U.S. participate in politics and are responding to the 2016 elections. Two freelancers have already joined the project. Their work will specifically examine issues Latino/a communities are confronting in the upcoming elections. We’re looking for character-driven stories that focus on how other immigrant communities engage in U.S. politics. Here are some themes we’re interested in exploring:   What interest is there in running for elected office in the U.S. and what are the barriers? What impact will new voter ID laws have on voter turnout? What factors contribute to disparities in electoral participation within different communities? What other ways are communities organizing to influence politics locally and/or nationally?   How is campaign financing influencing immigration rhetoric and policies?   Got an idea, let us know! Specifications Making Contact is an award-winning, 29-minute weekly magazine/documentary-style public affairs program heard on 120 radio stations in the USA, Canada, South Africa, and Australia.   Amplifying voices and perspectives rarely heard in mainstream media, Making Contact focuses on the human realities of politics and the connections between local and global events, emphasizing positive and creative ways to solve problems. We’re interested in pitches for sound-rich segments of about 7 minutes.  For these special segments by reporters who have a history of covering immigrant communities, we will pay $700. As with any pitches you send us, please check out our show and read our guidelines before you pitch. http://www.radioproject.org/production/submission-guidelines/ Consider the following. Does the story: Link grassroots issues and human realities to national or international trends? Give listeners a historical, political, or social context of major national and international events? Shed light on social and economic inequities? Explore any alternatives or solutions? Send pitches to pitches@radioproject.org. Please be detailed but succinct, and include a description of your idea, narrative/story arc, interview subjects, scenes, and sounds/ambi. If you’re pitching to us for the first time, please include a brief bio and relevant audio clips. We look forward to hearing from you! Laura Flynn and Jasmín López Making Contact Producers...

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