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Documenting FREDY : Eight Years After the Shooting in Montreal
Jul13

Documenting FREDY : Eight Years After the Shooting in Montreal

Fredy Villanueva was playing dice in a park in Montreal North when police officers arrived. In less than a minute, the 18-year-old was fatally shot by police. Eight years later, what happened in those sixty seconds remains unclear. The documentary play Fredy tries to untangle what happened before and after the shooting, as it asks questions about racial profiling, systemic discrimination, and the promise of art for social change. Featuring: Annabel Soutar, Artistic Director, Porte Parole Ricardo Lamour, actor, musician community activist Parker Mah, multimedia artist, community activist Florence Blain, audience member Actors voices: Solo Fugère – Will Prosper, Dany Villanueva, Ricardo Lamour, Iannicko N’Doua – Jeffrey Sagor-Météllus, Alain Arsenault, Alice Pascual – Anonymous police officer, Martha Villaneuva, Joanie Poirier – Stéphanie Pilotte, Lilian Villaneuva’s interpretor, Etienne Thibeault – Jean-Loup Lapointe Credits: Host: Jasmin Lopez Contributing Producer: Elvira Truglia Music: Emrical, Jahzzar, Alexander...

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Waiting for Home: The Refugee and Immigrant Experience
May25

Waiting for Home: The Refugee and Immigrant Experience

The root causes of migration vary widely. Some people migrate and return to their homes depending on the season. While others migrate and never return. Often, people are forced to leave or flee their homes indefinitely because of poverty, extreme environmental events, armed conflict, social strife, political turmoil, and economic hardships. On this edition of Making Contact, we hear stories from Central American migrants that take on oppressive debts or face challenges in schools in the U.S. We also hear from Cuban migrants stuck in limbo on the route to the U.S. The work in Guatemala was made possible by a grant from the Fund for Investigative Journalism. Credits Host: Jasmin Lopez Contributors: Luis Gallo, Zoe Sullivan, Eilis O’Neill Music: Ketsa, Blue Dot Sessions...

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Abortion Access and Eroded Rights
May11

Abortion Access and Eroded Rights

In 1973 the Supreme Court case Roe v. Wade established the legal right to abortion in the United States. Since then, state legislative and executive bodies have battled to restrict access to abortions. Federal law banned the use of federal funds for most abortions in 1977, and public funding for abortion remains a contested issue. One recent study in Texas found that more than 200,000 women performed abortions on themselves because they weren’t able to find clinical services. From restrictive laws to a lack of information to violent attacks, the blocking of abortion access is eroding the reproductive rights of women. On this edition, we hear from women at the New Orleans Abortion Fund and Ibis Reproductive Health, as well as experiences from a doctor who provides abortions and a woman that sought abortion access in New Orleans, Louisiana. Featuring: Jessie Nieblas, New Orleans Abortion Fund Liza Fuentes, Ibis Reproductive Health Natalie, teacher in New Orleans Diary excerpt from Dr. Susan Wicklund, an abortion provider under attack, as performed for Making Contact by Words of Choice with Actor Claudia Scheider, Directed by Francesca Mantani Arkus, Created and Produced by Cindy Cooper    Credits Music: Ketsa, Will Bangs Special Thanks to The Mary Wohlford Foundation for partial funding of this program. More information http://neworleansabortionfund.org/home http://www.ibisreproductivehealth.org/ http://wordsofchoice.org/ The Toll of Violent Anti Abortion Speech ‘Roe’ Revisited: The Path From Texas to SCOTUS for HB 2 Up to 240,000 Women Have Tried to Give Themselves Abortions in Texas How Bobby Jindal Threw Reproductive Health Under the Bus for His Presidential Bid Construction of New Orleans Planned Parenthood Abortion Biz Continues Despite Protests #is100enough Photo  by Debra...

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Life, Breath, and Toxics: Lethal Negligence of Northeast and South L.A.
Mar16

Life, Breath, and Toxics: Lethal Negligence of Northeast and South L.A.

From Norco, Louisiana to Flint, Michigan to Los Angeles, California – environmental racism is real. On this edition of Making Contact, we look at polluting industries in Northeast and South L.A. We begin with a story by Making Contact’s Community Storytelling Fellow Ivan Rodriguez, followed by an interview with journalist Aura Bogado and Los Angeles County Supervisor Hilda Solis. Featuring Ivan Maceda Rodriguez, Making Contact Community Storytelling Fellow Aura Bogado, Journalist, Grist Hilda Solis, Los Angeles County Supervisor Credits Host: Jasmin Lopez Contributing Producer: Ivan Maceda Rodriguez Producer and Fellow’s Co-producer George Lavender Music: Blue Dot Sessions More information: Exide cleanup: Toxic lead removal could be California’s biggest yet The sad, sickening truth about South L.A.’s oil wells Money doesn’t matter: White people breathe cleaner air   This show features a segment from our Community Storytelling Fellowship. Thank You to our generous sponsors   And all of our individual...

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Abortion Access Under Attack
Jan20

Abortion Access Under Attack

Special edition of Making Contact with guest Host, Rose Aguilar discussing reproductive health and abortion rights 43 years after Roe v. Wade. Featuring: Corrine Rivera-Fowler, deputy director of COLOR, the Colorado Organization for Latina Opportunity and Reproductive Rights Carol Joffe, professor at the Bixby Center for Global Reproductive Health at the University of California, San Francisco and author of “Dispatches from the Abortion Wars: The Cost of Fanaticism to Doctors, Patients, and the Rest of Us.” Credits Host: Rose Aguilar Producers: Laura Flynn and Jasmin Lopez Contributing Producer: Lisa Rudman Song: Alcantara by Indian Wells Photo: CC / by Steve Rhodes “Clinic defense of Planned Parenthood in San Francisco” More information COLOR (Colorado Organization for Latina Opportunity and Reproductive Rights) UCSF, Bixby Center “Dispatches from the Abortion Wars: The Cost of Fanaticism to Doctors, Patients, and the Rest of Us” RH Reality Check: Anti-Choice Legislation Mills Descend on Colorado, Report Finds...

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Looking Back Moving Forward: 2015 Year in Review
Dec23

Looking Back Moving Forward: 2015 Year in Review

From the Fight for 15 campaign to the Syrian refugee crisis, the past year was full of news headlines that were tough to keep up with. Making Contact is committed to in-depth critical analysis that goes beyond the breaking news. On this edition of Making Contact we take a look at shows we produced in 2015, and we ll find out what’s happened since. Featuring: Alicia Garza, Black Lives Matter co-founder Cat Brooks, Anti Police Terror Project Antonia Juhasz, Investigative Journalist Thomas DarDar, United Houma Nation Chief Mark Miller, Southern Utah University History professor Sylvia Rivera, Remembering Stonewall oral history project Michael Schirker, Remembering Stonewall oral history project Aesha Rasheed, Southerners on New Ground. Credits Host: Jasmin Lopez Music: Ketsa, Ryan...

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Abortion Access and Eroded Rights
Dec09

Abortion Access and Eroded Rights

In 1973 the Supreme Court case Roe v. Wade established the legal right to abortion in the United States. Since then, state legislative and executive bodies have battled to restrict access to abortions. Federal law banned the use of federal funds for most abortions in 1977, and public funding for abortion remains a contested issue. One recent study in Texas found that more than 200,000 women performed abortions on themselves because they weren’t able to find clinical services. From restrictive laws to a lack of information to violent attacks, the blocking of abortion access is eroding the reproductive rights of women. On this edition, we hear from women at the New Orleans Abortion Fund and Ibis Reproductive Health, as well as experiences from a doctor who provides abortions and a woman that sought abortion access in New Orleans, Louisiana. Featuring: Jessie Nieblas, New Orleans Abortion Fund Liza Fuentes, Ibis Reproductive Health Natalie, teacher in New Orleans Diary excerpt from Dr. Susan Wicklund, an abortion provider under attack, as performed for Making Contact by Words of Choice with Actor Claudia Scheider, Directed by Francesca Mantani Arkus, Created and Produced by Cindy Cooper    Credits Music: Ketsa, Will Bangs Special Thanks to The Mary Wohlford Foundation for partial funding of this program. More information http://neworleansabortionfund.org/home http://www.ibisreproductivehealth.org/ http://wordsofchoice.org/ The Toll of Violent Anti Abortion Speech ‘Roe’ Revisited: The Path From Texas to SCOTUS for HB 2 Up to 240,000 Women Have Tried to Give Themselves Abortions in Texas How Bobby Jindal Threw Reproductive Health Under the Bus for His Presidential Bid Construction of New Orleans Planned Parenthood Abortion Biz Continues Despite Protests #is100enough Photo  by Debra...

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Ruben Salazar: Man in the Middle
Sep23

Ruben Salazar: Man in the Middle

A radio adaptation of the documentary Ruben Salazar: Man in the Middle. This documentary examines the life and mysterious death of pioneering Mexican-American journalist Ruben Salazar. At the heart of the story is his transformation from a mainstream, establishment Los Angeles Times reporter to a supporter and primary chronicler of the radical Chicano movement of the late 1960s until he was killed by a law enforcement officer in 1970. Featuring material from recently released files, the program removes Salazar from the glare of myth and martyrdom and offers a clear-eyed look at the man. Featuring: Ruben Salazar, journalist Stephanie Salazar Cook, Ruben Salazar’s daughter Ernesto Vigil, Chicano activist Phil Montez, Ruben Salazar’s friend Danny Villanueva, former president and general manager of KMEX Bill Drummond, former LA Times reporter Bob Navarro, Earl Shorris, Steve Weingarten, Guillermo Restrepo, journalists Bill Thomas, former LA Times editor Julie Ruhlin, LA County Attorney Boris Yaro, former LA Times photographer Raul Ruiz, former editor and photographer at La Raza Newspaper Tom Wilson, former LA County Sheriff’s Deputy Jimmy Flores, witness. Credits Producer: Jasmin Lopez Featured music: Chicano Batman: Live on WFMU with Gaylord Fields: Jan 11, 2015 Special thanks: Phillip Rodriguez, City Projects, and PBS. More information: Full documentary: http://video.pbs.org/video/2365231799/ More: http://www.pbs.org/program/ruben-salazar-man-middle/ City Projects: http://www.cityprojects.net/ Ruben Salazar Project:...

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Not Throw Away Women: Black and Indigenous Women Disrupt Violence
Sep09

Not Throw Away Women: Black and Indigenous Women Disrupt Violence

On this week’s show we’re exploring how some women have been dehumanized to the point of indifference. We’ll learn how one community is undoing the silence around the violence women of color face. We’ll also hear about how serial killers were able to hunt down mostly Black women for three decades in South Los Angeles. Then we’ll take you to the Yucatan where pregnant indigenous women struggle under a health care system failing to provide proper medical care. Featuring: Rochelle Robinson, Making Contact Fellow Kimberly Smith, community member attending Her Resilience mural project Gabrielle Rae Travis,  Her Resilience Community Outreach Coordinator Margaret Prescod founder of Black Coalition Fighting Back Serial Murders and host of KPFK’s Sojourner Truth Mirna Aracely Tuz Acosta, Safe Maternity for the Indigenous Population in East Yucatan Neyi Amparo Cime Arceo, resident of Xanlah. Thanks to the Mary Wohlford Foundation for funding towards this program. Host: Laura Flynn and Jasmin Lopez Contributing Producers: Rochelle Robinson and Karen Stefan Tenorio Featured music: Blue Dot Sessions, Farsical Slow Driver, Inside the Origami Violin, Tanguedo Trans Alp, Gnossienne N1, Gnossienne N3 Black Ant, Fater Lee Broke For Free, Night Owl Phour Trakk, Long Transfer Kai Engel, Written in Ink More information: Her Resilience Kimberly Robertson’s obituary Black Coalition Fighting Back Serial Murders Sojourner Truth Radio HBO Tales of the Grim Sleeper LA Weekly, Grim Sleeper Returns: He’s Murdering Angelenos, As Cops Hunt His DNA The Grim Sleeper timeline Nick Broomfield Sociedad Mexicana Pro Derechos de la Mujer, A.C. Accountability in Maternal and Reproductive Health: Experiences from Civil Society from India, Mexico, and Nigeria Femicide in Mexico: Mapping of Silence Archival Footage: AP, New Sketches of California Serial Killer, December 18, 2009 ABC News, Grim Sleepers Mysterious Photos Normalizing Violence Puts Black Women’s Lives at Risk Making Contact’s fellow Rochelle Robinson brings us this story exploring how violence against women, especially women of color, is so pervasive that we’re numbed into thinking it’s nothing less than normal. While the homicide rate for Black women has decreased over the years nationwide, in 2010, the rate was twice as high for Black women than all female victims combined.  In this story the first voice you’ll hear is Kimberly Smith, and then Rochelle Robinson as they talk about their own brushes with death. How Serial Killers Stalked Black Women in South Los Angeles In the 1980s in South Los Angeles more than a dozen black women were murdered. Many of these women’s bodies were found in parks, alleyways, and dumpsters.It’s believed somewhere between 3 and 5 different serial killers were targeting the South LA community in the 80s and 90s. One suspect, Lonnie Franklin, Jr.,...

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Changing Communities, Imminent Threats: Katrina’s Legacy

On August 29, 2005 Hurricane Katrina ripped through the Southern Gulf Coast. Drawn by reconstruction work, the number of Latino immigrants has nearly doubled. Reconstruction after Hurricane Katrina drew thousands of people from India, Brazil, Mexico, Honduras, and other Latin American countries.  Workers were charged with pulling dead bodies from abandoned homes and rebuilding New Orleans. But the influx of migrant workers also increased immigration crackdowns. Making Contact’s Jasmin Lopez follows Jose Monterubio, a reconstruction worker. He tells us about his detention and how he stands for immigrant rights with the support of Congress of Day Laborers. Next, Jose Torres Tama recites Corporate Coyotes Smuggle Immigrant Workers, a poem from his book Immigrant Dreams, Alien Nightmares. Ten years later after hurricane Katrina, it’s estimated there are nearly 100,000 fewer African Americans living in the city of New Orleans.  Andrew Stelzer visits the Lower 9th Ward Living Museum, to learn how some are trying to preserve the lessons and legacies of the past. And we talk to a resident of one of the ultramodern homes built by Brad Pitt’s Make it Right project. As a new lower 9th ward emerges, what will it look like and who will be included in the remake? Featuring: Luis Medina, immigrant reconstruction worker Jose Monterrubio, immigrant reconstruction worker Jose Torres-Tama, artist Robert Green, Lower 9th Ward resident Beck Cooper, Director of the Lower 9th Ward Living Museum New Orleans Reconstruction Workers Fight to Remain On August 29, 2005, Hurricane Katrina ripped through the Southern Gulf Coast. Katrina left a trail of devastation stretching for years to come. Ten years later, it’s estimated there are nearly 100,000 fewer African Americans living in the city of New Orleans. Drawn by reconstruction work, the number of Latino immigrants has nearly doubled. Reconstruction after Hurricane Katrina drew thousands of people from India, Brazil, Mexico, Honduras, and other Latin American countries. Workers were charged with pulling dead bodies from abandoned homes and rebuilding New Orleans. But the influx of migrant workers also increased immigration crackdowns.   The Lower 9th Ward Lives On 10 years ago, the Lower 9th Ward became infamous for being the most intensely flooded part of New Orleans. Its population is now a fraction of what it once was. The exodus not only decimated a community, but threatens to erase the history of this largely poor, African-American district which is rich with both community, and controversy. Authorities intentionally blew up the levees and flooded the lower 9th on purpose back in 1927—that left a scar of distrust of authorities that lasts to the present day. We visit the Lower 9th Ward Living Museum, to learn how some...

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